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Customer experience strategy and innovation expert Woody Bendle is getting all crazy innovative in today’s guest post as he shares how to push for extreme innovation when you need it. Take it away Woody!

 

Creative Thinking Exercise for Extreme Innovation by Woody Bendle

One of the most exciting things to me in the innovation process is generating an array of possible ideas for uniquely solving unmet or underserved consumer needs.

i3-generate-ideas

As you see in the i3 Continuous Innovation Process map above, generating ideas happens AFTER the consumer needs have been identified. The reason for this is two-fold:

  1. If you generate new product and/or service ideas before you fully understand all of your consumers’ needs, there is a high likelihood you will waste time, effort and money chasing a cool idea destined to fail.
  2. It is easier to come up with possible solutions to a problem once you actually know what the problem is!

Assume we’ve done our homework and have clearly identified and prioritized all our consumers’ needs based on the magnitude of the opportunity.  The next step in the Continuous Innovation Process is to come up with as many possible ideas or solutions (regardless of feasibility), that might create meaningful new value for our target consumers.

I like starting idea generation sessions with a set of exercises I’ve developed called “Going to Extremes.”  The objective is to break the ice quickly and get the craziest, coolest, far-reaching things you can come up with on the table to start. The more absurd, extreme or ridiculous the idea the better!

go-extremes-exercises

As you begin working with these tools, it is important to frame each exercise in the context of exploring possibilities for addressing only one or two unmet (or underserved) consumer needs.  Narrowing your focus actually works in your favor when you are Brainzooming!

It is important to emphasize you really want to try to come up with 100 (or more) ideas for each exercise.  All ideas are welcome – as long as they are crazy, cool, extreme, ridiculous or even absurd!

In my experience, the best and most innovative ideas tend to be closer to the 100th idea than the first, so keep generating as many ideas as you can.  And don’t judge them, because the next step of the i3 Continuous Innovation Process is where we weed out the ideas that don’t make economic sense.

The Value of Going for Extreme Innovation

After working with these creative thinking exercises for several years, I’ve found them effective for several reasons:

  1. They explicitly make it okay to say something a little (or a lot) crazy. Everyone has a little “crazy” in them, and they now have permission to let it out!  And, Column C reinforces that we’re looking for stuff that is really really crazy, cool and way out there! As a side note, how many times do you suppose Thomas Edison, Steve Jobs or the Wright brothers heard, “That’s crazy!” – only later to hear “This is awesome!” or “This is amazing!”
  2. Because you are going for quantity in addition to the extreme, participants tend not to overthink their ideas in search of that spectacular idea – they just let them rip!
  3. Thinking about the why and the what (column B) highlights functional and emotional benefits which often lead naturally to new, even better ideas for Column C. (Remember that breakthrough innovations tend to be much closer to the extremes than where we currently are. )
  4. Lastly, these exercises are a ton of fun!  Now, who doesn’t need more fun in their life?!

So here is a crazy idea; the next time you are planning an idea generation session, why don’t you give these Going to Extremes Exercises a shot?

And if you need a little added encouragement, let’s give a listen to what Seal has to say about getting a little Crazy.  Better yet!  Play this tune in the background during your next idea generation session! Woody Bendle

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

 

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John Q. Harrington is back today with a warning for digital marketers to not walk past the big idea in pursuit of big promises from applications devoid of creative thinking and big idea potential. Here’s Q!

Creative Thinking: What Digital Marketers Could Learn from the Wizard of Oz by @JohnQCreative

John-Q-HarringtonToday’s marketers have awoken and found themselves transplanted into a strange and marvelous world – a Digital Land of Oz.

Here the miraculous has become common and the common seems to have vanished.

Social media creates meaningful relationships with masses of individuals. Social analytics track the source of a trend or a problem to a single person. Big Data gives sales pitches to customers before they even realize they want something.

The wonders of the great and powerful Digital Oz keep growing and growing, but there is one voice of warning rising amid all the pyrotechnics:

“PAY NO ATTENTION TO THE MAN BEHIND THE CURTAIN!”

Contrary to what many of the Wizards of Digital Oz say, they are NOT all knowing and all powerful. Digital Oz clearly has created some marketing marvels, but there is one thing it cannot create – a big idea.  And big ideas seem to have all but disappeared behind the glare of the flash and dazzle of the latest digital marketing tools.

Yes, I said it.  Digital is a tool, NOT an idea.

Too many marketers are so enamored with the amazing feats of Digital they think the need for a big idea or a great position has been eliminated.  If anything, the need is greater than ever!

A decade ago, marketers only had a dozen or so arrows in their quiver. Newspapers, magazines, TV, radio, basic web sites, email, direct mail and a handful of other tactics were all they really had to work with then.  With digital, today there are well over a hundred marketing tool options and more coming online daily.

Each of these tools has a different set of strengths, weaknesses, and people guiding them.  Firing all these weapons and hoping for the best does get results.

But think how much more powerful they would be if they all had a common focus and big idea driving them!

A big idea or a great position is a virtual brain that can help guide ALL your marketing tools and multiply their effectiveness.

So please, do not become so seduced by the amazing tools of Digital Oz that you think they ARE the same thing as a big idea. Remember this?

“I’d unravel every riddle, for any individual
In trouble or in pain.
With the thoughts I’d be thinking,
I could be another Lincoln
If I only had a brain.” -  The Scarecrow

See, even the least intelligent resident of Oz knew he was nothing without a brain. – Q

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Customer experience strategy and innovation expert Woody Bendle is sharing his perspective on the links between corporate strategic planning and brand strategy today, including a great strategic brand planning tool to help identify branding opportunities and gaps your organization faces. Without delay, here’s Woody!

 

Brand Strategy – A Strategic Brand Planning Tool by Woody Bendle

Mike has published recent pieces on strategy and strategic planning that inspired me to reflect on the process and effectiveness of strategy, especially brand strategy. It fascinates me that strategy and strategic planning are often considered separate and different from brand strategy.  Since many executives don’t understand what a brand is, they don’t realize an organization’s brand should govern and be the basis for corporate strategy and planning.

Strategy and Brands

Strategy should effectively set an organization apart from competitors.  A good strategy (well executed) can make an entity appreciably unique and compellingly relevant to a meaningful proportion of consumers. This is precisely what a good brand does!  So why is brand strategy so often overlooked in corporate strategy or planning?

I believe there are three reasons:

  1. Lack of understanding
  2. Misperceptions – Corporate strategy and planning are considered to be for “left-brained numbers people’ and brand strategy (if an organization even does it) is for “right-brained marketing
  3. Complexity – Brands are complex, somewhat abstract, and don’t fit neatly into financial spreadsheets

While the concept of a brand can be difficult to get your head around, that complexity shouldn’t suggest branding be ignored. Let’s break down the concept to its component parts, tackling the basic definition first.

So what is a Brand?

Most of us can name dozens of brands, including our “favorite” brands.  We can describe brands and frequently make decisions because of them.  So, while brands play roles in our lives, defining a brand is where many get hung up.

Through studying how consumers and organizations develop, manage, think about and relate to brands, I’ve developed the following definition:

A Brand is something that provides and is both identity and meaning.  It is a continual interpretation that exists as a result of that which is conveyed by an entity through its communications, products and/or services, and that which is understood by those who interact with that entity’s communications, products and/or services.  

That seems pretty abstract and complex, I’ll admit.  Let’s simplify it to an organization’s brand being:

  • Who it is
  • What it stands for or represents
  • Why it exists
  • How it behaves, communicates, and/or operates
  • How it is, and how it wants to be seen and/or thought of

For those interacting with (i.e., purchasing, using, consuming) a brand, it is:

  • A commitment or promise by or from the brand itself
  • An aid for decision making
  • An intrinsic and extrinsic reflection of who they are
  • A statement about what they value and believe in
  • A tacit or explicit signal about how they see themselves and how they want to be seen by others

The next layer of complexity in branding is because brands are not completely within an organization’s control.  While companies or individuals create brands, they exist in a dynamic perceptual ecosystem, i.e. an intricate network of interactions between and among an array of constituents (as shown here).

Dyanmic-Brand-Ecosystem

Brands directly interact with and influence perceptions for a number of different constituents (the blue arrows).  These constituents influence and affect the brand through reciprocal relationships of varying strength.  Over time, the full power and impact of a brand results from a vast multitude of direct and indirect interactions within the ecosystem.

This creates two implications:

  1. Once a brand is launched, the originator no longer fully owns it.  It is shared by all who directly and / or indirectly interact with it.
  2. While the brand’s originator does not fully own the brand, it retains absolute responsibility today and in the future for how the brand is viewed.

So because brands are complex and are shaped by others outside your organization, managing it overall demands a well-articulated brand strategy!

A Strategic Brand Planning Tool

So with the definition addressed, let’s pull apart a brand and systematically examine all the different brand interactions.  This tool I developed helps me effectively do that:

Brand-Plng-Template

Step one is identifying the brand constituents populating the rows by answering:

  • Who are all the parties interacting with your brand?
  • Who has a say in your brand’s future?

After creating your own list of brand constituents systematically work through each column.

  • Column A – Think about how you would like each constituent group to describe your Brand.  What should your brand stand for with each of them?  How should it be known?  Note – this is an internal exercise since you have to answer and own how and what you want others to think about your brand.
  • Column B – How does each of these different groups actually think about, or describe your brand?  What are they saying about it to others?  Are you regarded positively by some and negatively by others? Surveys and social media listening are great sources for this.
  • Column C – This column pinpoints areas with differences between how you want your brand to be thought of and how it is currently regarded.  Some differences will be subtle and others could be rather large. Additionally, this column’s answer can be quantitative and/or qualitative.  
  • Column D – After identifying areas with meaningful perception differences, outline things your organization can or will do to close these perception or image gaps.

As you work through brand tool, some cells will be easier than others to complete. Only you can determine whether it is worth the effort to collect the information needed. After using this tool many times, I’m confident you will identify several things important to your brand’s future that warrant further discussion and attention.

Good (Company) to Great (Brand)

Body-TattooCompanies and organizations are a dime-a-dozen; many have very similar overarching goals and objectives.  If an organization has been around for any length of time, it is probably doing a number of things well.  But is it truly great?  Is it considered a Great Brand?

Great Brands are different; they are one-in-a-million!  Great Brands connect by providing a deeper sense of identity and meaning.  Great Brands wind up tattooed on peoples bodies (I’m betting the first brand that came to you right now was Harley Davidson)!

Great Brands don’t happen by accident! Great Brands are the result of great, well-executed brand strategies!

As you tune your strategic plans for next year, secure a seat at the strategic planning table for your brand management effort.  It just might earn your brand a prominent place on someone’s body! Woody Bendle

 

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John Q. Harrington shared a very popular first guest post recently on creative thinking and 9 Ways to Amplify Creativity. Q is back today with 7 reasons why he’s concerned the No Child Left Behind law is putting the US behind in the creative thinking and problem solving skills we need to compete. Here’s Q!

7 Reasons No Child Left Behind Is a Bigger Threat than a Government Shut Down by John Q. Harrington

John-Q-HarringtonThe biggest threat to the future of America is not global warming, not an errant meteor, not even the maddening Government Shut DownThe biggest treat to our country and our children’s future is the NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND law.

What, you say?  Hasn’t that been around forever?  And hasn’t it helped to improve test scores?

Yes, it seems like it’s been around forever and yes, it has helped to improve test scores.  But higher test scores are more about memorizing than learning.

7 Threats to Creative Thinking from No Child Left Behind

1. It destroys original thinking, our secret weapon.

The secret sauce for America’s success over the last few centuries has been our love of independent thinking.  We have an almost cultish reverence for those who thought differently and changed the world.  Edison, Ford, Bell, and Jobs are among our most famous, but millions of original thinkers help us to keep reinventing our world and staying relevant every single day.

2. It places a premium on standardized test scores.

Like so many things, No Child Left Behind started with the best of intentions: to elevate the learning of all children by assuring they receive the same standard high quality education.  Unfortunately, the only way to measure the result initiating a series of standardized tests for all students.  If you scored well on the test, you must be doing well.  If you scored poorly on the test, you must be falling behind.  Schools that scored well were rewarded.  Ones that did poorly were chastised and eventually shut down.  So, understandably, schools began to put major emphasis on getting their students to score well on the test.

3. Tests measure memorization skills, not learning.

The MOST important thing we can teach every child is how to think and problem solve.   Even though free form thought is a little messy and not totally predictable, it is what makes us great – or at least it used to make us great.  We need to teach children how to think so they can solve the problems no one knows the answers to yet.   Teaching them to only memorize teaches them to do what has always been done.  And in our world of exponential change, that is a recipe for disaster!!

4. The need for memorization is rapidly moving toward obsolescence.

Why is it critical for children to memorize historical facts and figures when the answers are readily available within seconds on the internet?  Isn’t it much more important to teach them WHY wars and events came to pass and make them think about HOW they might reach a better outcome when they’re older and in charge?

5. It’s the last straw for great teachers.

I’ve always been surrounded by great teachers. I’ve lived next to them, been friends with them, dated them.  Even married one and have a child who’s one of them.  But in all my years of being around great teachers, I’ve never seen them so frustrated and disheartened.  They’ve persevered through low pay, insufficient supplies, and decreased power in the classroom.  But No Child Left Behind hit great teachers like a Mike Tyson punch to the gut. Really great teachers hate teaching to achieve high test scores as much as students hate learning that way. Great teachers find highly imaginative ways to involve students in their subjects, climb inside it, and truly understand the subject, not just parrot back facts and figures about it.

6. It dumbs down how all teachers teach. 

As standardized test scores become the all-important factor in education, standardized ways of teaching are being shoved down educators’ throats. So not only have we knocked the original thinking out of our children, we’ve knocked it out of our teachers!   As a result the best teachers are leaving after a few years, retiring early, or changing careers in droves.  And that only accelerates the downward spiral created by No Child Left Behind.

7. It gives our kids knives, then sends them into a gunfight. 

Global competition is fierce and it’s only going to get more intense.  We’re turning our children into cannon fodder in this global battle if we send them into battle armed only with memorized facts and figures.

It isn’t cost prohibitive to fix NO Child Left Behind

Fixing No Child Left Behind can be done and done affordably.  A recent article in Wired Magazine showed how a small school in a Mexican border town slum totally turned things around by trying a completely different approach.  I’m not saying their approach is the best education option, but I am saying No Child Left Behind definitely is NOT. If a poor Mexican village can figure this out, surely we can do better, too.

The goal of No Child Left Behind was right, but the outcome is not.  So let’s cut our losses and move on to some new, more imaginative way of educating our next generation.

Who knows?  If we teach our children how to think better, maybe we won’t have to tolerate the insanity of another government shut down in the future. – Q

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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I’ve known John Q. Harrington (or Q as he’s known to everyone) for more years than either of us will admit to in public!

Q, a national and international award-winning Creative Director for 20+ years, and I first worked together when he was creative director for our advertising agency of record back in the early corporate days. It’s great to feature his first Brainzooming guest post today, with 9 tips to amplify creative thinking in any business:

Creative Thinking – 9 Tips to Amplify Creativity in Any Business by Q

John-Q-HarringtonThroughout my career, I’ve learned hundreds of tricks that help amplify the creativity of the people who report to me.  Here are my top 9 tips you can use to give a booster shot of creativity to any department in any company:

  1. Create an environment of praise instead of fear.  Nothing dries up creativity faster than rampant negativity and fear of making a mistake.
  2. Don’t give people a million rules, give them a few absolute ones then let them have free rein on everything else.
  3. Don’t take the credit, give the credit.
  4. Praise the behavior you want loudly and often.
  5. Be fair, but don’t tolerate non-performers.  Keeping around dead weight demoralizes the people who are trying really hard.
  6. Don’t compete with your underlings.  If you’re always trying to one up your staff, they will quit trying eventually.  If they don’t solve the problem exactly the way you would have, GREAT!!!
  7. Give people a clear, simple, lofty vision of where you want to go.  BE VERY CONSISTENT TO SUPPORT THAT VISION.
  8. Don’t worry so much about watching the clock on employees.  If they accomplish the goals you want, let them figure out creative ways and times to make it happen.
  9. Try to inject some aspect of fun into everything you do right down to the office space.  Just look at the offices, benefits and the results at Google.

Do all that and you’ll have the best and the brightest lining up to work on your team. – Q

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact TheBrainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

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Customer experience strategy and innovation expert Woody Bendle  got all ranted up by yesterday’s post. It highlighted the typically annoying customer experience strategy choices by car rental companies to try and aggressively upsell customers. Today, Woody offers his thoughts on what’s happening behind the scenes when brands go astray in such ways. Here’s Woody!

Customer Experience Strategy – The Universal Purpose of Business by Woody Bendle

Ranting-Woody-Bendle2Mike’s September 16, 2013 Brainzooming post on “Customer Experience Strategy – Annoying Car Rental Questions” really resonated with me.  Why?  Because stuff like that really drives me nuts!

Mike’s car rental experience in Cleveland provides such a clear (and unfortunately, not uncommon) example of a yet another company that has completely lost its way.  Companies like this have sold their soul to the almighty metric and profit gods and are needlessly tossing their valuable customers into the proverbial volcano!

OK, so maybe that was as little dramatic; but in my mind, there aren’t too many things much worse than a horrible customer experience!  When I hear about (or see for myself) experiences such as Mike’s, all I can do is shake my head and think, “Here’s yet another company that has lost sight of its true purpose.”

The Universal Purpose of Business

So here’s the deal, each and every one of us in business essentially has the same universal purpose:

To continuously pursue the creation of value (or utility) for our customers and/or consumers.

I know… this statement will likely get the “well duh!” award from many of you because it is sooooooo obvious.  But, if it is sooooooo obvious, why do sooooooo many companies seem to operate as if their mission is to do exactly the opposite?  Mind boggling isn’t it!  I know each one of you can name at least one company or organization that you feel is only in existence to drive you nuts.

Here’s another way to put this universal purpose of business in perspective.  Can you think of any legal business where this statement won’t work?  I can’t.

We could have all sorts of fun speculating and debating why or how organizations allow (or perhaps even incentivize) such horrible customer experiences; but more likely than not, the real reason will boil down to something along the lines of having a corporate culture that no longer truly lives and breathes the universal purpose of business.

Four Critical Customer Experience Strategy Questions for Customer Value-Driven Organizations

Look, let’s admit it – business is hard; and there is absolutely nothing in the universal purpose of business statement that makes it any easier.  And, if it were easy, you probably wouldn’t enjoy it as much!  But if you want to stay in, and profitably grow your business, do yourself a favor; step back every once in a while and take a good look at all of the different ways your customers interact with your organization and/or brand.  As you are doing this, ask yourself the following four questions:

  1. Is what I’m doing creating value for my customers?
  2. Is it really?
  3. What value am I actually creating?
  4. How might I create even more value for my customers?

The key when you are doing this is to answer these questions from your customers’ perspectives and not your own.  Better yet, find one of your better customers that you really trust, buy them a cup of coffee and let them answer these questions for you!  It might be the most rewarding cup of coffee you’ve had in a long time! Woody Bendle

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Customer experience and innovation expert Woody Bendle  is here on the Brainzooming blog to share a great approach for recycling the customer feedback program data that’s sitting in organizations with incredible innovation potential . . . for those who are savvy enough to take advantage of it. Here’s Woody!

Recycling Customer Feedback Program Data for Innovation by Woody Bendle

Recycling Customer Feedback DataDoes your organization have a Customer Experience Management (CEM) program?  Are you currently measuring and monitoring Customer Satisfaction (CSat)? Do you have a customer support center receiving and responding to customer feedback through phone calls, emails and letters?  Do you have a Facebook fan page where customer feedback comes via posts about themselves and your company?  Do you have customers talking about you on Twitter or on blogs?

If you said yes to any of these customer feedback scenarios, you’re probably already holding the keys to your company’s next innovation opportunity!

Intrigued?

Many of you have likely made substantial investments in obtaining, monitoring and leveraging customer feedback through CEM, CRM or CSat programs.  Each customer feedback program can create tremendous value for your organization by providing timely and actionable consumer insights related to your customers’ interactions with your associates and brand.

But what you might not realize is that this exact same customer feedback data can be leveraged for innovation.

Innovation is the process of creating new (and differentiated) customer value in the marketplace, which can create a sustainable competitive advantage.  This process has three phases (Identify, Innovate, and Implement) and each phase has three steps:

The most critical step in the innovation process is identifying unmet or under-served consumer needs.  Unfortunately however, this is where so many innovation efforts go awry – that is, right at the very beginning!  And let me tell you, when you screw up the beginning, it’s pretty much all down hill from there.

Do you realize that 80%+ of all new products launched each year fail?  This is beyond absurd; it is down right irresponsible and completely unnecessary!  The reason for this massive failure rate is because organizations either don’t understand the importance of addressing unmet consumer needs or they simply don’t care to take the time to identify their customers’ unmet or underserved needs.   And this where your existing CEM, CRM and C-Sat customer feedback program comes into play.

It’s all about customer needs!

Let’s face it – the only reason your customers interact with your organization is because you satisfy one or more of their needs in some capacity.  By interacting with you, your customers are able to get through their day a little better than if they hadn’t (or at least that’s how you ought to be thinking about it).  And, when they reach out to your organization (either directly through you customer support center or your CSat program), they’re likely doing so because you have either exceeded, or have fallen short of satisfying one or more of their needs.  And while nobody likes to hear about how they’ve frustrated or disappointed customers, it is precisely in those circumstances that you need to pay closer attention because:

  1. They wouldn’t be sharing their opinions with you if they didn’t have a need that they were hoping you could or would satisfy (or satisfy better)
  2. They wouldn’t bother telling you what they thought if it were easy to get that need satisfied elsewhere, and
  3. They wouldn’t waste their time taking a survey or sending you an email if they didn’t care about the relationship they have with your organization.

It’s for all of these reasons that you should view your customer feedback system and data as a valuable innovation asset!

So while many of you are sitting on this incredible innovation asset, I’m guessing few of you have spent much time thinking about how to mine it for product, service and/or process innovation opportunities.  The good news is that you already have a ton of hugely valuable customer feedback data; and getting this data in the first place is the hardest and most expensive part!  With just a little additional effort, and perhaps some additional technology, you will find you are much closer to your next innovation opportunity than you realize.

In order to begin recycling customer feedback program data for innovation opportunities, you’ll want to employ a process where you:

8 Telltale Customer Feedback Phrases Identifying Unmet Customer Needs

To help kick-start your efforts, here are eight telltale phrases you will commonly encounter when customers are telling you how your organization is not adequately meeting their needs:

  1. Why is it that…?
  2. This is ridiculous…
  3. I don’t understand why…
  4. You would think that…
  5. How come every time I…?
  6. How am I supposed to…?
  7. I wish that…
  8. It’d be nice if…

While this isn’t an exhaustive list of phrases you’ll encounter once you begin mining and recycling customer feedback data for innovation opportunities, I’m betting you’ll be surprised by how often you actually encounter each of these phrases once you start digging in!  And hopefully, I’ve encouraged you to begin digging!

So what are you waiting for?  Let’s get innovating! Woody Bendle

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

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