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I came up with this list a few years ago when some friends were searching for high school reunion ideas that would help pass the time.

high-school-reunion-drink

It’s reunion time again. Here’s the list of fun questions in text and image form. Try them out, and see who fits each category at your high school reunion!

High School Reunion Ideas – 18 Fun Questions to Ask

  1. Most unrealized intellectual potential?
  2. Who has most over achieved?
  3. Most changed physically—male?
  4. Most changed physically—female?
  5. Least changed?
  6. Person I would most like to change places with?
  7. Would have taken better care of him/herself if he/she had thought he/she would make it to this reunion?
  8. Great news! __________ showed up.
  9. Great news! __________ didn’t show up.
  10. Too bad. ________ didn’t show up.
  11. Highest (unwarranted) opinion of themselves?
  12. Most changed?
  13. And I would know you from?
  14. When did you get so big?
  15. Boy…I’m glad I’m not __________.
  16. Over/under—plastic surgeries? 2
  17. Most interesting conversation?
  18. Most thought provoking conversation?

High School Reunion Ideas – 18 Fun Questions to Ask (image)

fun-questions-high-school-r
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Want to hang out with some of the Brainzooming crew in San Francisco next week and learn all kinds of valuable information on content marketing, social media, marketing strategy, and branding?

Yes, it’s possible to do a deep dive into all those areas, plus network with other smart marketers from across industries, all in one location.

You’re invited to join us at the Social Media Strategies Summit and The Marketing Conference, taking place concurrently at The Marines’ Memorial Club & Hotel in San Francisco, September 27-29. Registrants for either conference can move back and forth between the two, targeting the workshops and presentations that will be most valuable to their business success.

Did I mention there’s a special conference discount registration for Brainzooming readers? Keep reading for the code!

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I’ll be doing workshops on content marketing and collaborative branding strategy. I’ll be co-presenting the content marketing workshop and a presentation on marrying data and creativity with Emma Alvarez Gibson.

Other presenters are from Charles Schwab, Gap, Intel, and Campbell Soup.

Want to learn more about the combined opportunity of two conferences in one?

Here is conference producer Breanna Jacobs sharing more on the presenters and benefits of having two conferences agendas to customize your experience.

Earlier I mentioned a special discount code for Brainzooming readers (I.e., you!). When you register for The Marketing Conference, use the code MKTG25 to score a 25% discount on your registration!

We’re looking forward to seeing all our Bay Area (and traveling) friends next week in San Francisco for this incredible marketing meet up! – Mike Brown

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Are you looking for new, more effective ways to engage your employees in shaping and successfully carrying out your brand strategy? You need to download this FREE Brainzooming eBook, published with the Global Strategic Management Institute. You’ll learn three effective strategies to engage employees as an internal brand team.

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As we mentioned, business people are expending considerable energy preparing for strategy planning meetings. That is evidenced by our web traffic as searches for effective strategic planning exercises and effective strategy meetings jump.

Invariably, executives are seeking information on strategic thinking exercises suited to making strategic planning participants more effective and successful.

Strategic Thinking Exercises – Some Work, Some Don’t

That is why whenever we’re working in the Brainzooming R&D lab on new strategic planning exercises for clients, I’m reminded of this video. It’s a Monty Python sketch called “World Forum.” In it, Eric Idle plays a talk/gameshow host quizzing the big players in communism and socialism.

Why, you may ask, does this video remind me of strategic planning exercises?

Because the Monty Python sketch demonstrates how asking questions that participants aren’t suited to answer tanks strategic planning meetings. That’s why this video was an early inspiration for the Brainzooming approach to strategic thinking exercises.

Think about how closely the sketch matches your strategic planning meeting experiences.

In the first round, the host asks experts in communism and socialism about trivia questions pertaining to English football. Despite how opinionated they are in their fields of expertise, they can’t contribute beyond what they know. In the second round, it’s only through dumb luck that one of them positively answers a question far afield from what you’d expect they know. Finally, in the third round, a few questions about their areas of expertise lead to beneficial answers. After the topic returns to English football, however, it’s back to silence.

That’s just like many strategy meetings. Employees that rarely deal with strategy formally are peppered with questions and exercises about corporate strategy and business analysis they are ill prepared to answer. As a result, participants are frustrated and feel as if they wasted their time.

Creative-Thinking-Questions

It doesn’t have to be like that, though.

If you’d like to learn more about a better way to collaborate on strategy, we have suggestions for you that will really work for your organization!

Call us at 816-509-5320 or email us at info@brainzooming.com, and let’s talk about what will work best for your team. –  Mike Brown

 

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If you’re facing a challenging organizational situation and are struggling to maintain forward progress because of it, The Brainzooming Group can provide a strategic sounding-board for you. We will apply our strategic thinking and implementation tools on a one-on-one basis to help you create greater organizational success. Contact us at info@brainzooming.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you figure out how to work around your organizational challenges.


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It is time for strategic planning across organizations. To make it a little easier to track down ideas for how you can approach developing strategy this year, here are nineteen Brainzooming articles filled with 113 techniques and ideas for improving your organization’s strategic planning process.

While we go even deeper than this since the Brainzooming blog’s inception, these articles are all from the past twenty-four months (at the time we published it).

If you are responsible for leading the strategic planning process at your organization, dive in and tweak your process to improve its efficiency and effectiveness.

113 Ideas for Strategic Planning Process Improvement

strategic-planning-process

12 Questions to Jump Start Your Strategic Planning Process

5 Ideas for Simplified Strategic Planning

5 Keys to Streamlining Strategic Planning

4 Ways to Make a Strategic Planning Process Productive

10 Signs of a Strategy Planning Meeting Nightmare

6 Guidelines for a Great Strategic Thinking Workshop

11 Boring Details for Making Strategy Planning Fun

6 Last Minute Ideas for Fun Strategic Thinking Exercises

2 Types of Strategic Thinking Structure, One Works

5 Warnings to Heed about Free Strategic Thinking Exercises

9 Strategic Thinking Questions to Start Strategic Conversations

1 SWOT Analysis Example from the Safe

2 Ways to Collect Strategic Information from Multiple Parties

6 Steps for Creating a Vision Statement

4 Ideas to Rework a Faulty Vision Statement

4 Steps to Plan for Unplanned Events

6 Ways to Organize Lists of Strategic Ideas

9 Strategic Thinking Questions – Helping Teams Execute Strategy

6 Ways to Make an Impact with this Year’s Strategic Plan

In addition, remember: The Brainzooming Group is here to assist you in applying these techniques and more to make developing strategy a productive and high-impact activity for your organization. Contact us, and let’s customize a strategy process specific to your organization. – Mike Brown

10 Keys to Developing Collaborative Strategy

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The Brainzooming mini-book, “Results – Creating Strategic Impact” highlights ten proven lessons leaders can use to develop collaborative strategy and results for next year. Download this free, action-focused mini-book today to increase your team’s focus with productive strategy questions you can use to actively engage stakeholders in strategy AND implementation success.

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At a recent keynote presentation, an attendee asked me who should facilitate strategic planning for your company – someone outside or inside the company?

As I told the audience, a big part of what we do is offer strategic planning facilitation and development for clients. Yet the Brainzooming methodology started when I was facilitating strategic planning INSIDE our corporation.

Since we’ve had success in facilitating strategic planning from both insider and outsider roles, my answer was, “It depends upon the person and the situation.”

10 Vital Characteristics for Someone to Facilitate Strategic Planning

strategic-planning-meeting

Relative to the personal side of strategic planning facilitation, here are ten characteristics to look for in the person facilitating group collaboration-oriented strategic planning for your organization:

  1. Strong listening skills – to entire interactions and to bits and pieces of interactions, to what is being said and what isn’t being said
  2. The ability to put pieces of ideas together to make them stronger
  3. They either don’t have a stake in the outcome or can put those interests aside
  4. Somebody that’s funny, glib, and quick on his or her feet
  5. They have at least a basic knowledge of the topic
  6. The person is smart and strategic
  7. They understand structures and relationships they can apply to even unfamiliar industry settings
  8. Willing to both serve and challenge participants
  9. Have a strong grounding in business, creative, innovation, and strategic principles
  10. Have adequate time to prepare to facilitate

As you can see, these personal characteristics for strong strategic planning facilitators work irrespective of whether someone is inside or outside the organization.

It is definitely viable that a facilitator from inside the company can lead strategic planning.

Want to have someone outside your company make your strategic planning work for you in a creative, mentally stimulating and result-oriented way? Then contact us at The Brainzooming Group and let’s get started working together! – Mike Brown

10 Keys to Involving Employees In Your Strategy

FREE Download: “Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact”

Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-Book

Leaders need high-impact ways to develop employees that can provide input into strategy that turns into results. This Brainzooming mini-book, “Results – Creating Strategic Impact” unveils ten proven lessons leaders can use to boost collaboration, meaningful strategic conversations, and results.

Download this free, action-focused mini-book to:

  • Learn smart ways to separate strategic opportunities from the daily noise of business
  • Increase focus for your team with productive strategy questions everyone can use
  • Actively engage stakeholders in strategy AND implementation success

Download Your FREE Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-book

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I’m scheduled for a background interview today on creating a thought leadership strategy. The interview is an outgrowth of an eBook on thought leadership. The eBook came from a workshop someone did at a conference I’ve spoken at many times. I suspect when someone asked a question at the workshop about who the audience considered as thought leaders, a long-time friend was audacious enough to suggest my name.

While I’m sure it was a completely sincere gesture, I think pursuing a thought leadership strategy isn’t something a brand or an individual should do.

You ARE NOT a Thought Leader

thought-leadership-strategy

My personal antipathy toward a thought leadership strategy stems from a situation during my corporate life. A peer was developing a “think piece” on the transportation industry and our company’s place in its future. When it finally reached our department, the cover email mentioned my co-worker had already shared the document with all the company’s thought leaders.

That struck a teammates (who is incredibly smart and savvy) and me as a telling statement about how far we were from being thought leaders. We took a vow to never pursue or try to claim thought leadership status from that day forward since the overwhelming evidence (at least in that email) was that we weren’t.

That incident and a strategic desire to live behind (and not in front of) the Brainzooming brand means we’ve not addressed pursuing a thought leadership strategy as a topic here – other than Woody Bendle’s hilarious and completely on-target perspective about “So You May Be a Thought Leader.” We have also never pitched a client on developing a thought leadership strategy or influencer marketing program.

Trying to craft a strategy around promoting your brand or yourself as a leader based on thinking certain things is a poor and mistakenly inward-focused strategy.

That’s why I tried to get out of the interview after seeing the questions and realizing all my answers would be negative. The interviewer persisted and suggested the article may be focused on providing a contrarian view of pursuing a thought leadership strategy.

What to Say about a Thought Leadership Strategy?

Trying to form positive recommendations about a thought leadership strategy that still recognize a brand’s intent to share its message, here are alternative strategies brands should  consider:

A Servant Leadership Strategy

Identify the incredible ways you can serve customers. Serve and benefit customers in ways no other brand has done, then write about the impact of putting customers first.

A Value Leadership Strategy

Provide more benefits to customers than you would ever be able to charge for on a routine basis. Push your brand to incredible leadership in delivering value. Then write about how a value advantage makes a huge difference for customers.

An Employee Leader Strategy

Pursue leadership through inviting your employees to participate in shaping your organization’s direction. Help employees develop as leaders. After that, write about the impact awaiting other organizations when they embrace broad employee involvement.

A Humility Leadership Strategy

Serve your community, individuals, the unfortunate, and underdogs in extraordinary ways. Create impact through helping others that can’t help themselves in tangible ways. But then DON’T write about those stories. Allow the people you’ve helped to decide whether and how THEY will communicate what you’ve done.

What to do?

Those are all ways we’ve tried to create stories that first and foremost benefit the audience, then incorporate positive brand messages.

Companies and individuals that try to lead in these areas are ones to emulate because they are DOING great things, not simply THINKING about things and trying to create a cult of thought leadership. – Mike Brown

10 Keys to Involving Employees In Your Strategy

FREE Download: “Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact”

Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-Book

Leaders need high-impact ways to develop employees that can provide input into strategy that turns into results. This Brainzooming mini-book, “Results – Creating Strategic Impact” unveils ten proven lessons leaders can use to boost collaboration, meaningful strategic conversations, and results.

Download this free, action-focused mini-book to:

  • Learn smart ways to separate strategic opportunities from the daily noise of business
  • Increase focus for your team with productive strategy questions everyone can use
  • Actively engage stakeholders in strategy AND implementation success

Download Your FREE Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-book

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A recent Brainzooming article on changing your personal backstory recommended ensuring how you think about, describe, and conduct yourself maximizes the positive sentiments you generate among others. One input to revise your personal backstory is to ask how others see you. This suggestions prompted a question on what you should ask others (and how you should ask them) to get the best input for reshaping your backstory.

Ask people in a format that allows them to respond anonymously. You want to increase the likelihood they are going to share unvarnished sentiments with you. The easiest way to accomplish that is likely through some type of online survey.

7 Questions to Ask Others about Your Personal Backstory

personal-backstory-erase

Here are specific questions based off of those we use when developing personality-based brands. The input you will receive can help you decide what to add to and erase from your personal backstory:

  1. In a few sentences, what are your perceptions of who I am?
  2. What are words you associate with me?
  3. What are negative things you associate with me?
  4. What are positive things you associate with me?
  5. If you were introducing me to someone else, what would you say to them?
  6. In what capacity do you know me – professional, personal, or both?
  7. What’s our level of contact – used to be greater than it is now, it’s greater now than it used to be, or it’s been fairly consistent over time?

It would be great to be a bit more specific on the last two questions. You don’t want to be so specific about relationship questions, however, that people feel as if their answers will tip off who they are.

Across even five to ten people you should have a richer set of input than if you tried to revise your personal backstory based on your own thinking. – Mike Brown

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