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It’s pretty common knowledge that implementing an effective social media strategy takes time. That makes tips on how to maximize your social media productivity, such as those shared by Todd Schnick, co-founder of #Innochat, on his strategy for allocating your time very valuable. Todd’s recommendation was to divide your social media participation time into thirds, with 1/3 of your time within each category:

  • Observing / listening in others’ social media outlets
  • Participating in others’ outlets through commenting, guest blogging, etc.
  • Creating content and being active within your own outlets

Ever since Todd shared that concept in early 2009, his social media productivity strategy has been front and center in my mind (and ensconced in my social media strategy presentations). The truth is I rarely come close to this balanced approach since creating Brainzooming content definitely represents the majority of my time.

One way of improving your time allocation though is by investing your effort in activities which contribute to more than one of these categories. The following list includes some of the multi-category approaches I have tried.

13 strategies to maximize your social media time efficiency

1. Use tweets with your original content as input to create a blog post. For example, this blog post on 5 personal strategies started as a series of individual tweets.

2. Comment on another blog and use the comment as the basis for an original post on your blog.

3. Do a post comprised of comments (or links) other people have shared on Twitter you’ve found valuable.

4. Incorporate Twitter-based responses you’ve received from others on your content / ideas / tweets into a blog post.

5. Write a post inviting guest posts for your blog, then tweet links to your invitation post to solicit guest bloggers.

6. When you come across someone interested in topics related to your blog, ask them to do a guest blog post (and refer them back to the post in #5).

7. If you write a guest post for another site, do a complementary post on your blog pointing your followers to it.

8. Participate in Twitter-based chats on topics of interest (#Ideachat – Monthly, 2nd Saturday at 9 am ET) and use your comments during the chat as the basis for a blog post.

9. Create your own Twitter chat linked to your blog topic to benefit your audience.

10. Use answers you’ve created for LinkedIn Q&A or other discussion groups as starters for blog posts.

11. Write a response article to a blog post you’ve come across via Twitter, RSS feeds, etc.

12. Use what people on Facebook, Twitter, or other networks are talking about as the inspiration for a post. Be sure to include links to the original conversation, including letting the people you’re referencing know about it so they can promote it within their networks.

13. Answers to reader questions can be reformatted into blog posts. This post was originally an email response to a reader’s question about how to strengthen his social media participation without taking too much time from necessary business development activities!

What are you doing to maximize your social media productivity? Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we’ve developed  integrated social media strategy for other brands and can do the same for yours.

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I’ve already been told The Brainzooming Group “World Headquarters” is going to have a document clean-up and organization day near the first of the year. It’s been a long-time coming, I know, but that doesn’t mean it’s going to be any less of a chore. I’ll admit to retaining a lot of project documentation materials.

Quite frankly, I successfully go back to and use previously developed models and outlines from previous projects quite a bit. Before leaving the corporate world, I was handed a quick-turnaround assignment to develop a strategic marketing communications plan for a very infrequent business event. Interestingly, we had done a strategic plan for a similar situation years before. I was able to retrieve both paper and electronic copies of the document, creating an updated strategic marketing communications plan in only a few hours.

Long story short, if you can retrieve a project document when you need it, the strategy of retaining your past project documentation pays off in enhanced efficiency.

But in thinking about the decision making process for which documents to throw away, maybe these strategic guidelines I’m creating for myself will be helpful to you if you struggle with the same situations.

Here’s my strategy for three types of project documentation I’m planning to jettison:

  • Old Reference Material – In fast-developing markets, a lot of reference material simply isn’t relevant anymore. With changing business dynamics, the usefulness of historical studies and reports is likely deteriorating at an accelerating rate. The trick is figuring out which reference materials are worthless and which can still be good future inputs.
  • Anything that Can Be Retrieved on the Internet – There’s no need to house a lot of secondary market research information that’s easily obtainable via the web. I’ll be clearing out historical project files and simply searching to find updated information if I need it in the future.
  • Forgotten Work – If you can’t remember the work, and it’s not part of a filing system, you aren’t going to be able to get to it when you need it! You might as well work from memory and take the extra time to address it with a fresh perspective when it counts.

Let me know if you have any other tips!

I’ll be printing this post out and keeping my document retention strategy close when combing through and making decisions about the many boxes of old project documentation files waiting for me!  – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Does your organization have a defined social media policy? The mechanics behind creating a social media policy are an area where The Brainzooming Group, in collaboration with Nate Riggs, President and Lead Strategist of Social Business Strategies, has developed strategic thinking exercises to identify key social media-related issues. These are essentially the do’s and don’ts to be considered in defining a social media policy.

We’re always refining our strategic thinking exercises to make them more situation than category-based. As a result, they’re moving toward the form of, “What should happen when something else happens?”

Based on our experiences, some of the situations your social media policy ought to consider include:

  • What should take place when a customer complains?
  • What do you want to happen when someone takes exception to your point of view?
  • What are the differences when one of your social media team members is using social media professionally vs. personally? What about when it’s an employee not on the social media team?
  • When is it okay to share and not share content about work that you do for customers?
  • Are there times when norms on social media transparency contrast with your organization’s culture?

That’s a sampling of the situations we’re addressing with clients to create social media guidelines.

For us, the watchword for developing a social media policy is simplicity. In that vein, I wrote a guest post for Nate Rigg’s blog on the world’s simplest social media policy. If you don’t have some type of social media guidelines in place right now, this will be a helpful starting point, especially related to social media content sharing.

What situations would you add to shape the most effective social media guidelines?Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we’ve developed  integrated social media strategy for other brands and can do the same for yours.


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Personal fulfillment doesn’t have to be complicated. Consider this simple 4-step strategy:

1. List all the things you really suck at doing.

2. Identify the 50% (at a minimum) of your “suck at it list” that you can choose to ignore without any real problems.

3. Find people (even if you have to hire them) to do the other 50% of the things on the you “suck at it list.”

4. Pour your energy into what you do exceptionally well.

The result?

Collect your happiness and peace of mind annuity for the rest of your life!

If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

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I love the inventiveness of mashups. I particularly love all the insight and inspiration behind someone seeing a connection between multiple creative pieces that everyone else has missed. Good friend and emerging PR mega-talent Becky Johns tweeted about this Christmas mashup of Roxanne (by the Police) and the shiny-nosed Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer whose growing YouTube views may make it go down in history.

In this case, “red” and its prominence in both songs was the point of departure for a cool yule video which incorporates the stop-animation Christmas TV classic portrayal of the Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer story.

I’ll admit the mashup’s start is a little slow for me (okay, something is simply off in this part), but once Roxanne kicks in, this Rudolph mashup really does make me shout with glee! Enjoy the video! Mike Brown

For a magical creativity boost this holiday season, download the free Brainzooming ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” as a gift for your creative perspective!

If you’d like to have magic happen with your business strategy, contact The Brainzooming Group. We love using our whole-Brainzooming strategy planning process to catalyze innovative success and help your organization win big!  Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can create strategic magic for you.

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Magic happens through:

  • Creativity

  • Misdirection

  • Showmanship

  • Engaging storytelling

  • Illusion

Magic also happens through:

  • Discipline

  • Planning

  • Rehearsal

  • Process

  • Repetition

Magic happens through exploring big ideas with a whole brain approach!

When you do that well, it’s magic!!!Mike Brown

Taking the NO Out of InNOvationFor a magical creativity boost this holiday season, download the free Brainzooming ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” as a gift for your creative perspective!

If you’d like to have magic happen with your business strategy, contact The Brainzooming Group. We love using our whole-Brainzooming strategy planning process to catalyze innovative success and help your organization win big!  Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can create strategic magic for you.

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