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Based on the title, you might have been expecting a list from The Art of War.

If so, that’s not where we’re headed today.

St-Johns-Church-Cleveland

With yesterday’s post about discovering strategic insights I use in the secular world while at church, I challenged myself to document and share what some of the other strategic insights from church were.

The list starts with yesterday’s strategic insight about “small, possible steps” and adds the first eleven others I jotted down from my hymnal notes and Bible classes of the last few years.

12 Strategic Insights from Thousands of Years Ago

In an age when it’s fashionable to rule out religion as just some outdated thinking (or imagination or fables) from long-dead people, I’d stand behind any of this wisdom as highly relevant to my workday, and likely that of any reader here, as well:

  1. Once you’ve figured out where you’re headed, take all the small, possible steps you can to get headed there as directly as you can.
  2. Anyone, even the most unlikely person, can be THE person to save the day (or the strategy, project, event, etc.).
  3. It doesn’t so much matter if you’re off track during the process as whether you are heading in the right direction and how you ultimately wind up at the end.
  4. People get multiple chances, even if they burn you on the second or third chance.
  5. You’ll have a lot more success if everything you do reinforces everything else you’re doing in a conscious, deliberate way.
  6. Sometimes you’ll have to walk away from your original audience when they’ve decided they just aren’t interested.
  7. Wisdom trumps just about everything.
  8. You’ll typically have an easier go of things if you can deliver what leadership is looking for first, even if you have bigger or different ideas in mind.
  9. People aren’t always going to be ready to follow right away so you have to get them ready to see why your direction is the best.
  10. Use history to your advantage.
  11. When personal inspiration is lacking, familiar structure can get you started while inspiration catches up.
  12. There is tremendous learning and change value in repeating and integrating messages at pre-planned times.

I’ll add to this list over time as I keep oncovering new strategic insights. – Mike Brown

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

 

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You have to be on the lookout always and everywhere for the wisdom and insights that can help in creating strategic impact.

I get a lot of insights from attending daily mass.

Even there, though, the insights can come through ways you would never expect.

Yesterday’s mass was celebrated by Fr. Mirco Sosio, AVI. He was filling in for our pastor, who has been filling in for the usual priest, who is visiting his family in the eastern US. Fr. Sosio is from Italy originally, and he is serving as a temporary associate pastor at our parish for a few months. This was the first time I’d seen him.

During his homily, Fr. Sosio talked about the parable of the mustard seed. He likened it to a sentiment that the Franciscans (the orders of priests following the model of St. Francis of Assisi) have of embracing “small, possible steps.”

Small, possible steps?

Small-Possible-Steps

The phrase “small, possible steps” struck me strongly, because it speaks to exactly how I view strategy and creating strategic impact: First figure out what you’re trying to accomplish, and then you’ll understand any incremental move that gets you going (and staying going) in the right direction.

I grew up in Hays, KS around Franciscan priests, including going to a high school they operated. Yet I’ve never had a phrase from my youth to explain my strategic perspective, or even a recognition that it might have been shaped by the Franciscans.

But there it was staring me in the face at mass yesterday.

While we’re all a tapestry of what we’ve learned, experienced, and imagined, it is remarkable how many business lessons I’d have otherwise credited to my secular business career surprisingly surface in church with no recognition on my part that might be where they originated.

So as this started, be sure to be on the lookout always and everywhere for the wisdom and insights to help you in creating a strategic impact because you never know where they will emerge. – Mike Brown

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Trying to be perfect has come up in several strategic thinking workshops and conversations recently.

I definitely understand trying to be perfect. Been there, done that, and still try to do it way too often. But I’m getting better, even if not perfect, at cutting myself a break and not wasting time and energy on all the strategic thinking that can go into trying to be perfect according to standards nobody else really cares about at all.

Do you struggle with trying to be perfect?

7 Ways to Chill Out and Move beyond Being Perfect

Here are seven strategic thinking reminders I keep telling myself to try to get over the call to needlessly being perfect:

  1. Recall all the times when things weren’t EXACTLY perfect yet EVERYTHING was still completely fine. That’s the first step in lowering your own expectations for perfection.
  2. Understand that in most business situations, meeting your commitment to get something done is more important than absolute perfection coupled with the imperfection of delay after delay while you work on perfect.
  3. Go ahead and pick SOMETHING to be perfect at, realizing it means other things WON’T BE perfect as a result.
  4. Remember how many times you knew there were problems with something and NO ONE else did.
  5. Realize that all the collateral damage from being perfect in one situation keeps you from pursuing all kinds of other opportunities.
  6. If you weren’t such a perfectionist, other people would be able to HELP YOU and relieve your stress. Get over it and give someone else a chance to do even better than you might.
  7. It’s okay to have do overs; just make it easy on yourself to start over if something goes wrong.

Horsehoe-Game

Strategic Thinking on Being Perfect

I’m sure this list isn’t perfect. It could be written better or maybe things are missing.

But I’m okay with that! – Mike Brown

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Creative Thinking in Summer

There are some real challenges in the summer that just aren’t that big of a deal in the winter. Still, I like summer so much more . . . It’s really hard for people to change, me included . . . I take on stuff I really shouldn’t because I know there will be learning involved, and it’s SOOOOOOO tough for me to turn down a juicy learning opportunity.

The Wall Street Journal ran a story recently about a research project conducted on 36 kids who had been DIVIDED into THREE groups. They’re granting ridiculous credibility to assuming twelve kids in a split group represent all kids . . . With some potential clients you just want to say, “Don’t pull on my ears. I know what I’m doing.” You don’t, though, because it’s rude and offensive. Which is why it fits in the first place.

Challenging Words

Sorry, but I gave up early today. I’ll do better tomorrow with my creative thinking . . . I spent two hours driving around to do shopping and errands the other day because Cyndi can’t. That’s where the missing Friday blogs posts have gone this summer . . . It’s not a healthy sign when you are boring yourself . . . Some things just aren’t meant to be . . . You try saying, “a people peculiarly his own,” fast a couple of times (Deut 7:6) . Heck, it’s a challenge to even say it slow . . . Yes, I understand you are avoiding me.

DietDPatUMKC

There’s enough to love about the QuikTrip convenience stores brand just in its crushed ice machine and 79 cent, 32 ounce drinks during the summer . . .No, don’t claim you’re getting the exercise you need through “resistance training.” Resistance training doesn’t simply involve you vehemently disagreeing, refusing to cooperate, and then not wanting to talk about it . . . This band of flies that act drunk have invaded our house. I think they want be part of our Framily plan.

Good Words

The most profound words ever written about the human condition? “I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate (Rom 7:15),” gets my vote  . . . The truest words ever written about what passes for a lot of business expertise these days? Teddy Roosevelt saying, “Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell ‘em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.” – Mike Brown

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Yesterday’s article talked about creating strategic impact through breaking a business and recreating it as something new and better. I’ve been reworking various Brainzooming strategic thinking questions to make them better suited for identifying and exploring concepts for breaking a business.

9 Strategic Thinking Questions for Breaking a Business

Here’s a working list of the first nine refashioned strategic thinking questions.

  1. How would an incredibly successful company with a very different business model rework our business into something new?
  2. How can we go shopping with our customers on a daily basis to gain breakthrough product ideas?
  3. What do we have to do to increase our number of employee-generated ideas by 100x?
  4. If we listed everything we think is essential to our business, what would be the first 50 percent of items we would cut from the list to remake our organization?
  5. If we cut the number of product/service options, variations, and alternatives we offer customers, what else would we do to improve the value we deliver to them?
  6. What has our industry known about and ignored for years that could deliver incredible value to customers that no one has every pursued?
  7. If our brand is trying to catch the #1 in our industry, what can we do completely differently instead of simply following the leader once again?
  8. How can we boost our speed, expertise, and strategic thinking by an order of magnitude to disrupt our industry?
  9. How could we turn the most complicated processes in our customer experience into one-step processes that are dramatically easier for clients?

The first couple of questions focus on generating many more insights; three through seven address strategic options; eight and nine push for creating strategic impact via increased speed and simplification.

Which of these strategic thinking questions would you tackle first?

I’m leaning toward 1, 4, 5, and 9 as our initial strategic thinking questions to think about breaking our business and turning it into something new.

Which questions get you thinking about breaking your business? – Mike Brown

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At a creating strategic impact workshop, one attendee talked about breaking the business he runs and putting it back together in a new, different, and improved way.

Shortly afterward, I was on a conference call with an entrepreneurial business owner who mentioned reserving one day weekly exclusively for working on his business since he expects to be his own best client.

These two statements, one about breaking the business and the other about taking the time to do it, have been top of mind for me ever since.

Breaking the Business

Road-Work-Ahead

As with a lot of entrepreneurial companies, I suspect, we don’t spend nearly enough time doing for The Brainzooming Group what we do for our clients, i.e., imagining the future in new and innovative ways and detailing what it will take to make it reality.

There never seems to be the extra time, the right composition of people, or the mental distance to lead ourselves through the strategic thinking exercises and explorations we routinely facilitate for clients.

The result is our business changes have been too incremental, and frequently, not at the best times. We have been successful on some very important measures, but have not taken the business as far as we would have hoped and expected. We are very good in some processes to grow and develop the business and woefully behind in others.  As I mentioned to Stephen Lahey recently, we’re overly deliberate on developing “how” we do things and way too random on “what we do” and “how we build the business. “

For example, new blog posts, strategic thinking workshops, and client strategic planning sessions always happen when they are supposed to happen. New downloads, email campaigns, and business initiatives to build The Brainzooming Group do not.

Creating Strategic Impact for Ourselves

While working on new strategic thinking exercises and questions for a blog the other night, the idea struck me: Why don’t we try to break The Brainzooming Group into something new and improved, and write about that instead?

I haven’t completely decided that’s the next best thing to do, but it certainly feels as if it is. It simply seems like it’s time to impose the same discipline on ourselves that we bring to our clients to help them in creating strategic impact.

But since this blog is for all of you, I have to ask, is that firsthand story of breaking the business something you’d want to read about here?

Let me know what you think. – Mike Brown

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your brand’s innovation strategy and implementation success.

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Between working with smart consultants at A.T. Kearney and spending time at the Arizona State University Center for Services Leadership on multiple occasions, I became immersed in the concept of “high performing customers.”

As shared in a previous post, I obviously had some notion of making others “high performing” early in life. These later influences, however, provided a way to envision and define the concept more formally. You can think about creating high performing customers as anticipating what people taking part in a process might need to learn, know, or do, as well as how they need to adapt and behave so the process owner can deliver the greatest value.

Think about the vocabulary and process Starbucks uses to keeps its lines moving as smoothly as possible; that’s what we’re talking about with this concept.

7 Questions for Creating High Performing Customers

High performing customers have been at the forefront of my thinking while developing a new stream of Creating Strategic Impact content for a client workshop. While the workshop is rooted in strategic thinking, the focus is heavy on how to adapt a strategic planning process so the Marketing team can better facilitate annual planning.

impact-kauffman

If you have responsibility for designing, developing, or improving a process (especially related to strategic planning), here are seven questions to explore before you begin your task:

  1. What do participants know right now, and what do we need them to know?
  2. What strengths do they already have that will boost their success?
  3. How can we compensate for their weaknesses by changing the process or bringing other resources to them?
  4. How should the process be designed to keep them engaged (mentally, emotionally, socially, physically, etc.) as long as needed?
  5. Are the participants pretty much the same, or do some of them have materially greater or lesser likelihoods of success?
  6. In what ways can we involve participants with the highest likelihood of success to shape and/or help carry out the process for others?
  7. In what ways will other processes they are involved with affect their success?

The answers to these questions are tremendously helpful in thinking about processes from a user’s perspective to help design something that sets them up for success.

How We Apply these Questions to Strategic Planning Process Design

When I tell people we design planning processes to suit a client’s situation, as opposed to introducing a standard process, they must wonder what that means exactly.

Our strategic view is it’s easier to change what we do to help participants perform as needed, than deal with the frustration and challenges of putting them through a strategic planning process that is ideal for us, but doesn’t work for them. This distinction is at the heart of how we approach strategic planning.

If you’re up for it, let’s talk about what this concept might mean for planning at your organization. – Mike Brown

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