Brainzooming – All Posts | The Brainzooming Group - Part 161 – page 161
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As last week’s post about showing appreciation on Twitter started, “social media is about being social, whether you are an individual or are representing a brand.” And in response to a status update on Facebook about the Twitter appreciation post, a grade school friend I’ve become reacquainted with on Facebook over the past year, Carrie Sparkman, essentially said it would be nice to see how the Twitter etiquette rules I shared would translate to Facebook.

That was an intriguing request since I spend a lot more time on Twitter. But since Carrie is particularly wonderful at Number 1 below, I was compelled to try and address her request.

These nine etiquette ideas for showing appreciation to Facebook friends are some suggestions to make your shout out really count:

Showing Appreciation

1. Make It Personal

Write a personal, heartfelt, and encouraging comment for a Facebook friend who has made a difference for you and post it on their wall. Or even better, write an encouraging comment for someone who needs YOU to make a difference for them.

2. Don’t Just Like Them

Go beyond liking another person’s Facebook status update and actually share their content with your friends as well. Include your comment about your appreciation for the person, their accomplishment, or their content. You can also share photos or video of the person you want to celebrate.

Calling Attention to Your Appreciation for Your Facebook Friend

3. Tag, They’re It

Actually tag the person you are showing appreciation for in your update. You can tag a person by first typing the “@” symbol and then the person’s name. People whose names match what you’re typing will start appearing on screen; hit enter on the correct person to enter a link to their profile. If you want to only use the person’s first name in the update link, backspace over the last name to erase it while still keeping the link to the individual.

4. Let the Public See It

When you’re showing your appreciation for a Facebook friend, change the sharing criteria (from the drop down toward the lower left of the message) on the status so that it is “Public.” That way, the widest possible audience can see what you have to say. Be sure to change the sharing status back to what you typically use before you make your next update, however.

5. Linking of Others

Provide a link to where people can learn more about the person you appreciate, i.e. to a blog or website. In this way, people can connect with them on places other than Facebook.

Be Both Predictable and Surprising

6. Happy Birthday

Take advantage of the Facebook Happy Birthday notifications to share a few words of celebration and a birthday greeting with Facebook friends. If you’re in touch with them on other social networking platforms (especially email), consider sharing Happy Birthday greetings there.

7. I Wanna Like You All Over

When you see great content from a Facebook friend somewhere else on the web, click the Facebook Like button associated with the content to show your appreciation.

8. Surprise Someone

Don’t just show appreciation for those you interact with frequently. Show appreciation to your Facebook friends for no apparent reason, especially if you haven’t interacted with someone for an extended period of time.

Don’t Call Undue Attention to Yourself

9. Cool It on Facebook Apps

Another way to show appreciation? Be purposeful about what you share with your Facebook friends. Don’t use Facebook:

  • To invite people to events they have no hope of ever attending
  • To send them Facebook app requests that clog their Facebook notifications
  • As a repository for other websites to post your activity on their sites while filling your Facebook status updates with low value information.

What are your etiquette ideas when you show appreciation on Facebook?

What are you doing to show appreciation to Facebook friends? What do you find works best for you, or even better, what encouraging messages do you appreciate seeing show up for you? – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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4

Kansas City was blessed with two significant architectural design innovation breakthrough project in the last third of the 20th century, with both coming from the same architectural tree—the firm of Kivett and Myers.

One design innovation was Kauffman Stadium (nee Royals Stadium) and its fraternal twin at the Truman Sports Complex, Arrowhead Stadium, set the standard for modern sports design. The Kansas City firms attached to Kauffman Stadium and Arrowhead Stadium made Kansas City ground zero for architectural design innovation in sports stadiums, ballparks, and arenas. Hardly a major sports stadium or arena gets built globally without a Kansas City architecture firm being involved or being the benchmark against which other firms are judged.

Source: Kansas City Aviation Department

The other architectural design innovation breakthrough was Kansas City International Airport (KCI). After it opened (also in the early ‘70s), it became the model for airports from Dallas to Germany to France to South America. Kansas City International Airport was designed on a “drive to your gate” concept that allowed departing local passengers to have as little as a 75 foot walk from the vehicle depositing them on the terminal curb to the entrance to the airport jet way.

As a result, if you live in Kansas City, you love Kansas City International Airport. If, on the other hand, you have connected through Kansas City, you probably hate it. With the advent of enhanced security, what was once an architectural design innovation is now a struggle if you have to change planes—much less, airlines–or to find any amenities if you have to layover.

When Innovation Outlives Itself

In the case of the sports stadiums, when they began to show their age and fell behind the amenities offered at newer sports stadiums, the voters and the Kansas City sports teams decided to invest more than $500 million and update. But they stayed true to the original design innovation breakthrough concept.

Kansas City International Airport, however, faces a more difficult decision. Many Kansas City locals still love it, but it has too many buildings (and too many gates), an increasingly outmoded security system for passengers and baggage, significant environmental issues, and a challenge to offer the conveniences out-of-town flyers expect.

What KCI does have is the visionaries who built it in the first place being willing to call for another architectural design innovation, saying, “Do something different.”

At a roundtable discussion on KCI, Past, Present and Future, Bob Berkebile lead designer for KCI, and Hanan Kivett, nephew of Clarence Kivett and a former architect with Kivett and Myers during the construction of KCI, both said it was time for the city to move on.

Berkebile challenged the architects of the city to come up with something even better, even more innovative, “It’s a new opportunity to celebrate Kansas City.”

Looking Ahead for Another Innovation Breakthrough

That is likely the mark of a true innovator, someone who does not live in the past, but recognizes when it is necessary to search for the next defining innovation. – Barrett Sydnor


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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your customer service in a smart way without seeming as if you’re micro-managing the customer experience.

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1

Plenty of people have created lists of desert island discs, but this is different. Suppose you’re stuck on a desert island with just enough supplies to sustain your existence, PLUS a phone, a charger, a strong mobile signal, and your favorite Twitter app that will only let you follow 10 tweeters.

I know, this is a pretty wacked-out desert island scenario, but stick with me.

Now that you can only have 10 people to follow on Twitter, who would be your dessert island tweeters? Who has demonstrated in the past that they’re so intriguing to follow on Twitter they warrant a precious space on your list? Or who, based on what they might be able to do for you, could earn a spot among your top 10 Twitter friends?

Choosing Desert Island Tweeters

For whatever reason, the question of a desert island tweeters list struck me the other night as I had Tweetdeck open and was looking to engage in some fun, creativity-inspiring conversations on Twitter.

I could imagine a whole variety of criteria to consider when choosing desert island tweeters:

  • A person who you can always depend on to tweet with you
  • Someone who always rewteets you?
  • Someone who has a lot of followers who might retweet you once in a while and would hopefully retweet your requests for help
  • Someone who is a “fan” of yours
  • The person who is ALWAYS cheerful and has an encouraging tweet to share
  • Somebody who shares Triberr tweets 24/7
  • Big brands that tweet links to press releases
  • People who tell you about how great they are and tweet photos of the incredible things they’re doing right now
  • Foursquare addicts
  • A non-responder who never has a tweet for you when you tweet them
  • The old friend you rarely hear from, but will pop up on Twitter when you least expect it
  • The person who you KNOW will be on Twitter daily, even if they’re not tweeting with YOU
  • An IRL friend who you also happen to know online
  • A famous person who shares his or her life
  • The social media rock star who has lots of links to new stuff, but not so much conversation
  • Only people who also follow you
  • Tweeters who tweet about topics of interest to you
  • The people who tweet ALL the time
  • The attractive person who frequently tweets pictures of him/herself
  • #FollowFriday devotees who recognize you every week
  • Someone who tweets old quote from guys who have been dead for thousands of years

The list of criteria could go on and on for who to follow on Twitter if you could only have your  top 10 Twitter friends as your desert island tweeters.

So who WOULD BE your desert island tweeters?

Do any of these criteria help you come up with your desert island tweeters? Are the other criteria you would use?

And maybe most importantly, if there are people you wouldn’t add to your desert island tweeter list because they do some of the things listed here, why do you put up with them on Twitter every day?

Oh, and if you want to share your list of desert island tweeters (or even your list of desert island discs), you’re more than welcome to do so in the comments section below! – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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4

Some people ooze creative confidence. They display a sense of self-assured creativity that can fill you with equal parts admiration, envy, discouragement, and disbelief (that anyone can have their act that together relative to how to be more creative).

For those of us without that elevated level of creative confidence, how to be more creative and boost our personal creative confidence can be a big question.

3 Ways to Your Boost Creative Confidence

Here are three ideas to boost creativity and shape how to be more creative in your daily activities:

1. Train on your creative wins to boost creativity.

Always have memory triggers you can use to recall creative wins you’ve enjoyed as a way to boost creativity. These can be photos, videos, audio files, mementos, portfolios, correspondence – anything to help recall ways you’ve used in the past that will help you now in how to be more creative.

So how do you “train” using these memory trigger to boost creativity? Considering these creative wins, ask yourself these questions:

  • What was the creative impact I helped deliver in this situation?
  • How did I prepare creatively for this creative win?
  • What creative process did I use?
  • How did I overcome any creative challenges I encountered?

Answering these questions can help build your creative confidence through recalling specific creative strategies you want to make sure you use again to be more creative now.

2. Go with what you know and add something else you don’t to be more creative.

Instead of simply relying on your creative talents that feel most comfortable and were tested creatively years ago, how about picking a comfortable creative talent combined with a creative pursuit you’ve rarely pursued? I’m trying to apply this advice right now for how to be more creative with the Brainzooming blog. I’ve written more than a thousand blog posts on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Now I’m now searching for a different creative approach to pair with writing to boost creative energy and develop a new blog experience. (BTW – if you want to share some creative ideas on this, I’m very interested in hearing them!)

3. Go with what you don’t know and stretch your creative confidence.

To dramatically boost your creative confidence, dive into something completely new creatively, conquer it, and build on your successes (and challenges) from the effort.

This creative approach isn’t a strong suit of mine since I enjoy going to school on new activities before diving in creatively. I do try though to put myself into situations where I’m forced to try new creative strategies.

One example recently was attending an improv comedy breakout at the Big Ideas conference. Everyone had to stand up and participate in the improv comedy exercises. While I like making up funny jokes and remarks in reaction to things that happen in life, this was the first time I’d ever done improv comedy exercises designed to boost your comedy skills. The comedy exercises were fun, and I feel a lot more confident in my ability to do something like this again without preparation.

When you’re working on how to be more creative, what do you do?

Have you successfully tried one of these creative strategies or a variation on one of them? Are there other creative strategies that are working for you to boost your creative confidence? Let us know your ideas. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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8

Social media is about being social, whether you are an individual or are representing a brand. And just as it’s important to know how to show appreciation to others in real life, you want to make sure you understand social media etiquette, too. Having watched many of the same etiquette gaffes play out relative to unwritten Twitter etiquette ideas about how to show appreciation, it seemed time to share these ideas.

These Twitter etiquette ideas for showing appreciation aren’t hard and fast rules. They are simply observations from watching a lot of people interact and seeing some really cool and some really poor ideas for how to show appreciation on Twitter to others.

Showing Appreciation

1. Don’t Put Someone’s Name at the Start of a Shout out Tweet

If you want to give someone a shout out, don’t start the tweet with the person’s Twitter handle. If you start a tweet with someone’s Twitter handle (i.e. you @ reply to them), only you, that person, and anyone following both of you will typically see the tweet. Put their Twitter name somewhere inside the tweet, even if that means you start the tweet with a single period so their name isn’t the first thing in the tweet.

2. Don’t Make Every Thank You a Pat on Your Own Back

Don’t make it a practice to retweet shout outs you receive from others and simply tack on a thank you in front of it. When you do this all the time, it can appear you’re starved for validation (i.e., “I need people who follow me to see someone else liked what I did”). Simply thank them for the kinds words or supportive action, and even consider doing it privately in a direct message to the person (although admittedly some people don’t ever look at direct messages).

Calling Attention to Others

3. Help People You Can Help

It’s great Twitter etiquette to spend more time recognizing and promoting people with fewer followers than you. This may not boost your social influence numbers as much as chasing social media rock stars, but you can have a much more significant impact on making someone feel welcome and appreciated online when you do this.

4. Going beyond Tweeting to Show Appreciation

You can also show appreciation to others for their great content in multiple social media channels. Create a link post with content and people you find really beneficial. You can share these links on your blog, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+ or other social networking platforms. It’s a nice way to call attention to the people you care about across multiple social media channels.

5. Everybody Appreciates Working Links

At the most basic, retweeting someone else’s tweet is a great show of appreciation. Sometimes you may want to take it a step further. If you’re going to create your own tweet of someone else’s great content, make sure you get the link right so your audience will actually be able to see and appreciate the great content someone else created.

Following Great People

6. Follow the People Who Help You

Strongly consider following back people who retweet your content, include you in a #FollowFriday, or give you some other type of shout out tweet. What a great way to connect with someone who actually appreciates your areas of focus as opposed to building automated connections with people who have no clue who you are.

7. If You Still Do #FollowFriday

Throughout the week, create and schedule #FollowFriday tweets for later in the week focused on people who you appreciate the past seven days. And consider doing individual shout-outs with some background on the person as opposed to #FollowFriday tweets comprised of simply 5 or 6 names with no real reason why anyone should follow them.

What are your etiquette ideas when you show appreciation on Twitter?

Do you already use some of these Twitter etiquette ideas? Are there other etiquette ideas you try to follow when you show appreciation on Twitter? What’s working for you? – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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0

Google Fiber recently held an event at the Kansas City Public Library exploring the state of Internet access in Kansas City, a.k.a. the digital divide. When I was signing in, a Google rep at the registration desk noticed that I was from The Brainzooming Group and said, “Brainzooming. We use that Gigabit City report you produced all the time.” She was referring to the “Building the Gigabit City” report that we produced with the Social Media Club of Kansas City after an intensive brainstorming session at the very same library last fall, which involved more than 90 community leaders and interested citizens from around the Kansas City metro.

That was a reminder how ideas build upon one another and that answers often must percolate a while—and be addressed from different perspectives—before they move forward toward implementation.

The Digital Divide in the Gigabit City

One focus of the “Building the Gigabit City” report was the urban core in Kansas City. Many of the participants in the urban core brainstorming session group were concerned about the digital divide. The question of whether urban core residents, particularly those who are older and with fewer economic resources, might be left even further behind once ultra-high speed Internet came to town was a particular focus in the brainstorming session. The digital divide has also been a recurrent theme in the work of the Mayors’ Bi-State Innovation Team and is reflected in its playbook.

The Google digital divide event provided additional data points, including an excellent take from John Horrigan of TechNet on why we should be concerned about the digital divide even if we are on the other side of it. In his talk, John Horrigan highlighted multiple impacts of the digital divide:

  • Increased costs to society of the digital divide
  • Greater challenges for people to gain access to jobs
  • Negative educational outcomes resulting from the digital divide
  • Limits on our ability to deal with the increasing cost of healthcare in the US.

Horrigan also made the point that while mobile access to the Internet via smartphones does bridge part of the digital divide gap, it falls short in both quality of experience (because of the limiting nature of the small screen) and in depth of experience (because of increasingly onerous data caps and throttle).

At the Google digital divide event, Google unveiled some excellent research that not only quantified the the size and the geography of the digital divide, but also drew some conclusions about why it exists, and offered insights into how the digital divide might be bridged.

Addressing the Digital Divide

The reality of the digital divide is a reminder that truly profound innovation and creativity carries not only the burden of producing breakthrough ideas, but also of producing the path by which people can use those ideas in a broad and sustainable manner.  –Barrett Sydnor


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How can ultra high-speed Internet speeds drive innovation? “Building the Gigabit City: Brainzooming a Google Fiber Roadmap,” a free 120-page report, shares 60 business opportunities for driving innovation and hundreds of ideas for education, healthcare, jobs, community activities, the digital divide, and more.  Download this exclusive Google Fiber report sponsored by Social Media Club of Kansas City and The Brainzooming Group addressing how ultra high-speed Internet can spur economic development, growth, and improved lifestyles globally. 

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1

Yesterday, I was at Kansas City’s Gem Theater in the historic 18th and Vine District to live tweet TEDx18thAndVine with streamed, time-shifted sessions from 2012 TEDGlobal in Edinburgh, Scotland.

At least that was the original plan for TEDx18thAndVine. Unfortunately, technical challenges at Kansas City’s Gem Theater and with the video server had the production team valiantly scrambling onstage and off to keep the crowd engaged, leading to a generous mix of TED Talk archive videos throughout TEDx18thAndVine. Nonetheless, the day was marked by enough intriguing content under the Radical Openness theme to leave one’s head swimming by the end of the day.

Nine mini-recaps from TEDx18thAndVine TED Talks:

Philosophical Espresso

Fast-talking, performing philosopher Jason Silva starred in a 2012 TEDGlobal Radical Openness theme video and then joined Chris Anderson onstage. Talking with Anderson, he described his rapid-fire musings as “Shots of Philosophical Espresso” and “Movie Trailers for Ideas.” Just one of the big thoughts from Jason Silva: “Awe makes things new again. And that’s ultimately the best drug in the world.”

“RADICAL OPENNESS” – for TEDGlobal 2012 by @Jason_Silva from Jason Silva on Vimeo.

Those Who Remember the Past Too Well Are Doomed to Not Understand the Future

Discussing our need to determine a course of action incorporating climate changes underway and those in the future, environmental policy influencer Vicki Arroyo reminded the audience we are entering uncharted territory, and we cannot use the past to plan. Or as Arroyo put it, “Stationarity is dead.”

Learning and Changing Priorities

Andreas Schleicher (Education Surveyor) discussed what sets apart those countries who are leading in educating their youth.  Three specific ideas from his 2012 TEDGlobal presentation that struck me were:

  • “Everyone says education is important. But how do you weigh that priority against others?” (You can ask this question about anything people think is important.)
  • How well kids can extrapolate from what they know to new situations is a measure of their change preparedness. (When facts change rapidly, this is a fundamental future learning skill.)
  • “Learning is not a place but an activity.” (A small sentence packing a big challenge to the educational system as we have known it for a century or more.)

Eye Contact vs. “i” contact

One of the previous TED Talks shown at TEDx18thAndVine was from the TED 2012 “Connected, but Alone?” presentation by Sherry Turkle. Her focus was how the constant availability of communication devices changes how we think and interact with others. There weren’t necessarily many supporting facts, but there were a variety of standout comments from Sherry Turkle:

  • “If we don’t teach our children to be alone, they’ll only know how to be lonely.”
  • “I share therefore I am.”
  • “We expect more from technology & less from each other. Technology appeals to us most where we are most vulnerable.”
  • Facebook and Twitter pages make it seem as if other people are listening to you.
  • People think the problem with conversations is that conversations happen in real time (you cannot control when they happen), and you cannot control and limit the interaction.  What matters most to people is to control their own attention for what they want.

Integration > Innovation

Jonathan Trent from NASA focused his TED talk on the OMEGA project that seeks to grow algae in the ocean to create new liquid biofuel. His wrap-up comments on the OMEGA project and success factors for the future came right out of our Brainzooming innovation work:

Suffice it to say the perspectives Jonathan Trent shared about making change happen were right on target.

The Earth Is Rounder than We Think

Globalization thinker Pankaj Ghemawat shared a variety of statistics form his book World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve It (affiliate link) to support his point of view that the spread of globalization is many times less than the public believes. Pankaj Ghemawat has a word to describe the big messaging behind the earth being flat (affiliate link) and the pervasiveness of globalization: Globaloney. He suggests globaloney is a result of a dearth of data, peer pressure to see the world as one, and what he calls, “technotransis,” or an inability to NOT be sucked up into the expectation that technology will be all-pervasive and solve the world’s ills.

Step Up and Step Back

At day’s end, percussive guitarists Usman Riaz (the young gun) and legendary guitarist Preston Reed (affiliate link) collaborated on a striking, first-time guitar duet. Afterward, TED host Chris Anderson asked them to do something more, acknowledging they may not have prepared anything by saying, “We just want to see another 30 or 40 seconds, and if it goes horribly wrong, it’s fine.”

Sure, go for it in front of a global audience. The two guitarists talked briefly and launched into another number, playing out a great lesson if you’re ever asked to improv with someone else: let the junior person shine (Riaz played lead) and the more experienced individual support, providing background and structure (Reed was more “percussive” than “guitarist”). The natural tendency might be to have a more junior person take a step back, but their collaboration showcased Usman Riaz, while making it apparent that Preston Reed was the underpinning to their guitar collaboration.

Words to Live By

“If you want to make something you love (i.e., TED stage time) better, give it away.” – Chris Anderson

2012 TEDGlobal Wrap Up

As I tell anyone who asks, watching a streamed TED event is different than watching popular TED Talks from the TED website. When looking at individual videos, you’d think every TED Talk is fantastic. When you watch a whole array of them as they’re delivered, your takeaway is that there are boring and ho-hum TED Talks, too.

You also take away, as I did during yesterday’s 2012 TEDGlobal Session 6: Misbehaving Beautifully that it is good to experience people on the fringes, but you need to not confuse yourself by thinking they represent the mainstream. Radical Openness is fantastic, but sometimes Radical Wariness is called for in equal doses! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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