Brainzooming – All Posts | The Brainzooming Group - Part 170 – page 170
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photo by: vandalay | source: photocase.com

I say every year about this time that this is the last post for the year, but invariably something strikes me over the holidays and another blog post appears. But in keeping with tradition, I’ll say it again: This is the last blog post for the year!

As with so much of like right now, 2011 seems on one hand as if it were about 4 weeks long, yet on the other hand, last December seems like 10 years ago.

I don’t know that I’ve seen a scientific explanation for why that’s the case. I suspect it’s because of the increase in the speed and number of inputs that fly at us all the time. The speed of it all makes time seem to fly by while we still process the 10 years worth of stuff now going past us in a single year as feeling as if it were 10 years. That’s my unscientific theory, at least.

2011?

The first half of 2011 was defined by a large social media strategy project for a client that seemed to be in a routine state of flux regarding what we needed to deliver. The second part of the year was consumed with the Google Fiber / Gigabit City project. And the last month has been a time where I’ve been saying to myself, “What just happened here with 2011?”

Amid that disorienting period of reflection, here’s my quick review of 20 business and personal lessons from 2011, along with 12 goals for the new year of 2012. It’s all subject to change, but it’s a starting point for a year that is tough for me to describe or pin down with one defining statement.

20 Lessons from This Year

1. When you get what you want, it may not look or feel like anything you expected. If things don’t feel right, first make sure it’s not simply the unexpected parts of what you wanted before you try to fix it.

2. On the other hand, quit putting off fixing what clearly is leading you off the path you need to be on with your life and career.

3. There are people who either can’t or don’t want to be helped. It’s okay to quit wasting time for both of you in trying to help these people.

4. If you can imagine what you have before it’s gone, it will change what you think is important right now, even if its importance isn’t matched by present day fulfillment.

5. More risk. More smart risks. More smart, high potential risks. More smart, high potential, challenging risks. Start a risk list – risks you need to take and the proof points the risks you took paid off, even if they didn’t seem to at the time.

6. Just showing up somewhere often isn’t going to get results. How much you’re willing to put yourself through productive pain and what you’re doing when you’re not physically there are huge factors in your success.

7. We can love distractions too much. That’s why it’s so hard to eliminate them.

8. My dad stopped working in my grandfather’s barbershop pretty early in life because he realized he was only making money when he was showing up and cutting hair. The downsides to the barbershop model extend to other businesses that may seem attractive, but are just as limiting.

9. If you don’t watch out, the craziest person in a team or organization will control the agenda.

10. There are a whole slew of things where other people are better than you in very profound ways. That doesn’t make it wrong to admit that in a few situations the tables are turned, and you should act accordingly.

11. A long time ago, I wrote a song with the line, “What have I done to ease the suffering of the stranger who you will later meet?” Of anything I’ve ever written, that line sticks with me. I don’t have a good answer to the question.

12. In time-based sports, great teams use time outs wisely. There’s no shame in calling a time-out.

13. There’s creative value in being good at selectively turning off your knowledge of what works and what doesn’t. There’s also value in being good at selectively turning on the WTF switch in your brain.

14. Some life and career seeds take a LONG time to sprout. Plant a lot of seeds, but not more than you can pay attention to and cultivate.

15. When you re-consider possibilities you didn’t pursue and still believe you’re in the right place even with the challenges you do have, it’s reassuring.

16. It’s incredibly rewarding to see your former “business kids” move to really imaginative places in their careers, even if you do miss them a lot.

17. It’s challenging, but in the game of life, you may have to dramatically change the type of player you are well into the game. You have to surround yourself with the right influences in your life to force the necessary changes to happen.

18. There are some incredible people in my past. For as much as I tried to resist spending personal time on Facebook, it’s put several of these incredible people back into my life to teach me important lessons.

19. Once you go all in, not many people are willing to follow. It can be worth doing it, however, to simply see which hangers on will drop out of the game.

20. Sometimes you just need to accept the ebbs of life because they’re there for a reason, even if you don’t appreciate the reason.

12 Goals for the New Year – 2012

1. Say “no” to more things, but not the same ones I’d have typically said “no” to in the past.

2. Ask for something fair in return.

3. Be more deliberate about periods of divergent and convergent thinking.

4. Do for ourselves what we suggest others do for themselves.

5. Learn from and hold myself to really changing based on last year’s lessons.

6. Provide you more value here, but also be more specific and determined in asking for value in return.

7. Don’t just wander into the next stage of life.

8. Care less about things that aren’t contributing to moving forward.

9. Don’t hang on so tightly.

10. Get better at having short versions of tough conversations.

11. Being deliberate about where “Mike” and “Brainzooming” begin, end, and overlap in the most beneficial ways.

12. Have more fun, do more cool stuff, worry less.

So what was 2011 about for you? I’d love to hear what you’re taking away from the past 12 months! Have a great holiday season, and I look forward to meeting back up here with you in a few weeks! Be safe! – Mike Brown

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Ever since the marcus evans B2B Summit in Colorado Springs in early November, I have been carrying around the list of all my tweets from the B2B Summit in my blogging notebook. Beyond the 20 strategic planning questions post the tweets prompted, there were a variety of brand experience, customer, and content marketing challenges issued worth sharing as we all think through what is ahead for 2012. The marketing challenges came from B2B Summit speakers:

Here are 10 marketing challenges to review where you stand now and where you want to prioritize your efforts for 2012.

Brand Experience

  • Great brands put every single employee through brand training. They build an almost religious fervor over the delivering the brand experience flawlessly. (Atul Vohra)
  • The brand should be the filter for every decision an organization makes. You have to invest enough time on your brand, because with advances in every other part of the world, branding is the only advantage Western countries still have. (Atul Vohra)
  • You have to rethink the purchase experience for your brand in light of Amazon setting the bar with its one-fee, unlimited two-day shipping and no-hassle product return policy. Amazon has made every purchase an impulse buy, with ripple implications you can’t ignore. (Mitch Joel)

Customer Targeting

  • If you’re in B2B, you have to make sure you’re paying attention to the fact human beings are at the heart of B2B. A warm body signs the contract. (Atul Vohra)
  • Target your messages to the right audience. Wasting your message on people who don’t care simply damages your credibility. (Michael P. Guillory)
  • In a world with young children growing up without keyboards and mice, you have to re-imagine the entire use experience for the youngest consumers. (Mitch Joel)

Content Marketing

  • Re-think every page of your website as if it were your homepage, because since Google is where people are going to find you, that’s exactly what every website page effectively is. (Mitch Joel)
  • Content marketing can’t be an afterthought if it’s going to be effective in growing your business. It has to be process-based, include clear next steps on every piece of content, and include metrics throughout. (Curt Porritt)
  • Don’t satisfy yourself with generalized content for your audiences. The best content marketers are using personas and creating content for each one – or even creating content platforms targeted at each persona. (Joe Pulizzi)
  • For each piece of content you create, look for 10 ways to repackage and market it. Start with individual blog posts and grow them into a book. (Joe Pulizzi)
There are several of those marketing challenges we’re thinking about how we’re addressing in 2012, especially on content marketing.  We’re looking at website changes and more effective delivery of content from The Brainzooming Group to you and other new audiences.
What are the top marketing challenges you’re facing for 2012? There’s a comment space below to share them, if you’d like some input on them! – Mike Brown

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This innovative article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating an innovative 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Several readers have shared challenges with surviving and thriving in a corporate career this year. A recent conversation began with a direct message on Twitter asking how I’d survived in corporate world for so long.

The Corporate World Is a Game

Photo by: kallejipp | Source: photocase.com

My advice was that a corporate career is like a multi-player, OFFline game. When you’re able to detach enough to view the corporate world as a game, your challenge becomes aligning with the right players, trying to stop as many bad guys as you can, and scoring as many points as possible for the organization and its customers.

The most important advice, though, is to do all that without losing yourself in the game. You need to be able to walk in the door each morning and leave each night as the same person you’ve always been. Over time, as you advance levels, you’ll start to see many of the same behaviors repeated, which is when things really get fun: you can use the repetitiveness to know where to take short cuts, increase your level of experimentation, and deliver stronger results.

Another thing to remember in a corporation is that anytime you throw that many people together, you’re going to have big pockets of really smart, cool people to work with and learn from – along with a healthy dose of co-workers who are incompetent, mean-spirited, checked out, and/or just in it for themselves. While the bad people are clearly a drag, there are ways to minimize their negative impacts as well.

Don’t Think Your Corporation Is Unique

As the conversation continued, I assured the reader his situation wasn’t unique. In fact, for nearly every issue he raised with corporate life, I recalled Brainzooming blog posts with advice and ideas on how to deal with it successfully. Going back through the Brainzooming blog, there were more than 40 posts addressing personal leadership, not losing your personal guiding principles, working successfully with others, confronting a negative environment, and actively managing your career success in a corporate environment.

There were so many articles on surviving and thriving in a corporate career, in fact, look for an eBook on the topic from Brainzooming in 2012.

In the meantime, do you have questions you want answered about thriving and surviving in a corporate career? – Mike Brown

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” for help in better using creative thinking exercises! For an organizational boost toward Taking the NO Out of Innovation, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I love questions to help you both expand innovative possibilities and prioritize ideas, and today’s Blogapalooza offers five questions fitting that description. This is second Blogapalooza post from Chris Gregory, vice president of marketing for a high-growth transportation engineering products company here in Kansas City.  Chris is sharing the five questions he uses to gauge whether an innovative idea is really what it purports to be:

Is Everything Really Innovative these Days?

Every couple of years a new catch phrase rises to prominence in the management lexicon. Today the word is “innovation.” As touted as innovation is as an asset, it introduces a challenge: how do you know it when you see it?

Because innovation is the buzzword, it permeates management’s direction to its teams and companies. “Be innovative!” New product launches now require a press release with the word “innovative” in the headline.

  • What are customers looking for? Innovative products.
  • How will we sell more? Innovative products and innovative marketing.
  • How will we solve internal challenges? Innovative processes and culture.
  • How will we build our brand? Innovative communications and service.
  • How will we staff our teams? Innovative recruiting and structures.
  • How will we beat the competition? Be more innovative.
  • How will we attract outside investment? Be known for innovation.

So if innovation is so critical to…everything…then how does one know when an idea is a valuable innovation? An idea labeled new, creative, progressive, insightful, clever, or even inventive may not be innovative. To reach that distinction, an idea is all those things and more.

5 Questions to Test for Innovation Potential

I scrutinize ideas using these five questions to determine their degree of valuable innovation:

1. Is it viable?

Sounds like a simple question. Unfortunately, most would-be innovators fail to analyze all the angles of their new idea. Focusing on the positives of an idea often overshadows the inherent challenges. For an idea to reach reality, it must have powerful benefits and nearly no downside. A new process that will quadruple productivity at only twice the cost has little chance of adoption. If you can double productivity at the same cost, then you really have something.

2. Does it meet a market’s need or want to an extent they never dreamed possible?

Good products can meet market needs. However, innovative products do it in such a way or to such an extent no one thought was possible. Because it took so long to get a message from one US coast to the other, the Pony Express was established. It was a faster version of the existing method for delivering mail. However, the telegraph solved the same problem in both a profoundly new way and to a far greater extent.

3. Is there a definable group that needs your innovation?

A better mousetrap is only useful to people who have rodent problems, can afford to solve them and are dissatisfied (whether they know it or not) with their current extermination method. Ask yourself if there are people who will jump at your new idea as soon they know it exists. Can you identify and find them? How will they become aware of your innovation?

4. If your innovation is a product, are your marketing and sales people excited about it?

An innovative product is so clearly valuable that your go-to-market teams cannot wait to get their hands on it. They see the opportunity to sell more and help their customers.

5. Are you changing the game?

Such a cliché, but a useful question. Does your innovation so fundamentally and obviously improve on or replace the previously available alternative that in a short amount of time no one will want the alternative?

How innovative is your idea?

If you answered yes to each of these questions, be assured your idea is innovative. If you answered yes to more than half, you have something valuable. If you said yes to three or fewer, your idea needs some work before deeming it to be an innovation. It may be a great idea, just not yet innovative. Chris Gregory

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Twitter Notes

Sometimes things are done simply because you simply declared them done.

With all due respect to all of us, most of the time, we have no clue what’s going to happen in the future. If hindsight is 20/20, foresight must be about 20/500.

I talked with a blog reader who asked where I came from. I said, “Well my mommy & daddy loved each other very much…” Apparently, that was too far back.

TV Quotes

“A great artist is willing to fail flamboyantly.” – Jerry Saltz, “Work of Art”

“They say you have to spend money to make money. I don’t know where we went wrong. We spent all of our money.” – Tom Haverford, “Parks and Recreation”

“I might read more if they put fire behind the words.” – Beavis

“As humans we want to categorize and organize things in our head, and it’s kind of hard to pin this piece down.” Bill Powers, “Work of Art”

Plus Some Creativity Quotes to Check Out!

Previous guest writer and creativity cheerleader Tanner Christensen is launching a set of iPhone lock screen wallpapers today featuring creativity quotes from some of the greatest minds in history on blog.aspindle.com. Tanner sent me a preview look Sunday night, and if you’re an iPhone user, I think you’ll enjoy them. I particularly like the Jack London quote. Can you guess why? – Mike Brown 

If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’ve written a variety of blog posts with blogging topic ideas with things to blog about when you’re out of ideas. When I see someone on Twitter expressing frustration with a writers’ block on their blog, I enjoy reaching out and sharing links with blogging topic ideas to get their creativity going again. Rather than continuing to cram multiple links in a single tweet about writers’ block, it seemed time to compile a big list of blogging topic ideas, especially for business bloggers.

If you’re stuck thinking about what blogging topics you can write about when you’re out of ideas, take a look through these ideas. I attempted to make these blogging topic ideas general enough they would have wide applicability, irrespective of your industry or business blogging focus.

This list is a start. Expect it to grow over time, hopefully with your ideas!  – Mike Brown

Use the Crowd

1. Announce a meet-up for local social media friends where people can trade topic ideas.

2. Answer questions your customers or readers have asked you.

3. Ask a question of your readers to see what they think.

4. Ask readers what they’d like to read about (without any prompting on topics).

5. Ask the next 5 people you meet to answer the same question and write their responses in a blog post.

6. Ask your spouse or significant other what you could write about.

7. Contact a couple of readers, ask them a question, and report their perspectives.

8. Interview a customer about what their concerns and challenges are.

9. Look for blog titles on Twitter and then write your own version of a post to go with the title.

10. Solicit guest blog posts from readers.

11. Solicit guest blog posts from business partners.

12. Run an online survey for readers and report the results.

13. Throw out a question on Facebook or Google+ and let the responses shape a blog post.

14. Publish a list of potential topics for the next month and let readers decide what they’d like to read.

Share What You Know

15. Interview yourself on a topic.

16. Recap a past event.

17. Recap the results of a research report someone else published.

18. Report on a conference you attended.

19. Reveal background information on something you do to make your organization successful.

20. Share really cool work you or someone in your organization has done.

21. Share the results of some research your organization has done.

22. Summarize what you know about a topic.

23. Write about things that you know that others might not realize.

24. Write about what you do in your business to serve customers.

Teach Others

25. Expand your thinking on a previously published blog post to make it more teaching-oriented.

26. Take a new angle on a topic you’ve written about already.

27. Teach a new technique or tip you’ve been using.

28. Write about something you learned in the last week that you can share with readers.

29. Demonstrate a process your company uses that could be valuable to your audience.

30. Answer frequently asked questions that require demonstrations.

31. Feature experts in your business sharing their knowledge.

Create Lists

32. List what is more thrilling (or easy or exciting) for you right now than writing a blog.

33. Make a long list of ideas your readers could use.

34. Make a short list of steps readers can take to accomplish something.

35. Write anything that allows you to put a number in the title.

36. Add some additional items to a list you’ve already published.

37. List the types of customer problems you routinely solve.

38. List questions you’re getting in customer service.

39. Ask readers a question and report the answers in a list.

40. List the steps in a process readers could handle for themselves.

Share Opinions

41. Write what you think about a topic or a news story.

42. Disagree with a well-known blogger or social media celebrity.

43. Grab a relevant book off your bookshelf, open to a page, and write a response to one of the ideas.

44. Predict what you think will happen in the future.

45. React to opinions your business competitor or an industry figure is talking about.

46. Review a book or magazine article you’ve read recently.

47. Review a fantastic product or service you use in your organization.

48. Review something people are thinking about in your marketplace.

49. Share a half-baked idea to see if your readers can finish baking it for you.

50. Write a blog post that’s only 80% of the way done and allow readers to take a shot at finishing it.

51. Write about something completely obvious as if you’re the first person to ever think of it.

52. Write about something completely obvious in a way you haven’t written before.

53. Write about something you think will interest readers more than what you’ve been writing about recently.

Make It More Personal

54. Complain about a recent customer experience you’ve had.

55. Have your kid write or draw something.

56. Recount the story of a family pet who died.

57. Share an anecdote that happened in your organization.

58. Share random thoughts you’ve been trying to turn into complete blog posts.

59. Share your experiences with struggling to come up with ideas for blogging.

60. Talk about something you’re not good at doing.

61. Thank one of your customers who has been loyal to your business.

62. Use the first idea that comes into your mind and tie it to what your blog is about.

63. Write about the most interesting thing that happened to you today, yesterday, or this week.

64. Write about the story behind writing the most popular post you’ve ever written.

65. Write about what inspires you.

66. Write about what you do in your spare time that’s relevant and interesting.

67. Write about what you would have written about in an earlier period of your life – when you were in school, early career, etc.

68. Write something dramatically more or less outrageous than what you typically write.

69. Write something that allows you to name drop social media people who will share the post within their networks.

70. Write whatever is on your mind now and don’t self-censor it.

Repurpose Content

71. Combine smaller posts you’ve already written into a longer one.

72. Expand a comment you wrote on another blog into a full blog post.

73. Group a bunch of tweets you’ve made into a list or other blog post.

74. Organize (in new ways) relevant information that’s already been published.

75. Publish a list of links from your blog that make it easier to find everything on a particular topic.

76. Publish a presentation you’ve made on Slideshare and embed it in a blog post.

77. Re-edit and freshen something you’ve already written with new content.

78. Re-run the most popular post you’ve ever done.

79. Share an intriguing video that’s already done (by you or others) with a few comments to give your thoughts about it.

80. Start tweeting small thoughts and turn whatever comes out into a blog post.

81. Write up the points you cover in a slide from one of your Powerpoint presentations.

82. Embed a funny or on-target cartoon.

Use Video or Images

83. Have someone video you doing a brief commentary.

84. Video a demonstration relevant to your audience.

85. Video an interview with a work colleague or business partner.

86. Ask the next 5 people you meet to answer the same question on video and edit the responses into a video post.

87. Use all photos and very few words.

88. Feature photos of your organization members doing interesting things (btw, people standing in line posing for a picture isn’t interesting.)

89. Video a customer talking about their business.

90. Have two customers interview each other.

91. Video a day in the life of your customer service organization.

92. Shoot a short video sharing some real reasons why someone should Like your page you on Facebook.

Starting Over

93. Throw out every idea you have and start all over with new topics.

What topics would you add to the list?

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This innovative article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating an innovative 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I was fortunate to have a corporate job where I could bring all the analytical, creative, research nerdy, music-loving, reflective, and outgoing parts of me into my work duties doing strategic planning and marketing communications. Being able to extinguish the work/personal life boundary so many people have to maintain was fantastic. There were very strong lines, however, between my corporate job and all the blogging and speaking already going on as Brainzooming, even though the two separate activities fed each other in a healthy way.

For as much as I’ve tried to have even fewer boundaries since leaving my corporate job, however, I’m surprisingly discovering renewed appreciation for the importance of boundaries.

Photo by: soundboy | Source: photocase.com

Good Fences Make Good Creativity

Working from a home office much of the time, there are now almost no boundaries between The Brainzooming Group and the rest of my life. Pretty much everything revolves around the business, which now includes both strategy and innovation work for clients and all the blogging and speaking that used to be what Brainzooming solely represented.

Interestingly enough, that’s now a challenge.

The few boundaries I did have between work and Brainzooming (which was more of a creative writing outlet) previously made both better. Now, the lack of boundaries between work and writing is having detrimental impacts, especially on blog writing. Blogging time used to be Friday night into the early hours of Saturday morning, then it was over for the week. It was hardly ever an issue to get five (and for a long time, ten) blog posts done during this time window because I knew there would be no blog writing opportunities during the workweek.

Now, blogging can happen any time, and it’s constantly a mental struggle between time spent blogging and responsibilities for client project work, business development, and all the other things for running a business.

Not only has this boundary-less work and creative situation made it more difficult to invest time in writing, the geography and tools of work and blog writing are now blurred in a negative way. The office environment that used to be new and fresh for Friday night blogging is the same place I’ve been working since 5:15 a.m. It’s made writing difficult for the first time in a VERY long time.

No particular answers yet, other than a new respect for healthy, creativity-inducing boundaries and a commitment to figure out how to re-establish some helpful boundaries.

Finding New Places for Good Creativity

Have you dealt with a similar creative challenge in the absence of positive creative boundaries around your work? What changes have you made to address it? – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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