Brainzooming – All Posts | The Brainzooming Group - Part 321 – page 321
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When you don’t have anything interesting to say, step aside and let the people who do have something to say have the floor:

  • “ . . . by pitting multiple scenarios of the future against one another and leaving many different doors open, you can prepare yourself for a future that is inherently unpredictable. Brainstorming pays off. And the more possibilities you can entertain, the less likely you are to be blindsided.” – Peter Coy and Neil Gross, Business Week, August 30, 1999
  • “The best way to have a good idea is to have lots of ideas.” – Linus Pauling
  • “I not only use all the brains I have, but all I can borrow.” – Woodrow Wilson
  • “It’s hard for corporations to understand that creativity is not just about succeeding. It’s about experimenting and discovering.” – Gordon Mackenzie
  • “Don’t ever miss a day without improving something personally.” – David Glass, Wal-Mart, 2000
  • “Your teaching must have the integrity of serious, sound words to which no one can take exception. If it does, no opponent will be able to find anything bad to say about us, and hostility will yield to shame.” – Paul of Tarsus
  • “Be so good that they can’t ignore you.” – Steve Martin

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Yesterday’s post talked about building a personal creative team that you can reach out to compensate for your creative shortcomings. It’s a tremendously valuable approach to take.

Here are three keys that will help you cultivate a strong personal creative team:

  • Start with the attitude of giving yourself to others. Before thinking about how people can benefit you, understand your talents so that you know how you can first serve them. I initially heard Zig Ziglar say that the best way to ensure your own success is by figuring out how to make as many other people as possible successful.
  • Treat people nicely, be friendly, and smile (either in person or in your voice or written word if you’re communicating via voice or email). Taking the first step to be kind, appreciative, and friendly will create incredible relationship opportunities and open many doors that might appear to be closed.
  • Embrace “mutualism” – a sincere effort to find commonly shared goals, even among potential competitors, where you can realize a greater good. A great example is former presidents Bush and Clinton coming together several years ago for Tsunami relief. Although political rivals, their effort helped others, while benefiting each of them personally in different ways. Embracing mutualism requires the ability to compromise, reprioritize, and share: risk, success, and the limelight.

There are many other keys to building a great team, but these three will take you much of the way. Give them a try as you add to your creative team.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Creativity in teams is critical because no single creative gift is sufficient in an of itself. A team provides the opportunity to assemble a whole variety of talents in a strategic fashion. It’s similar to the song “The Twelve Days of Christmas” where a whole variety of gifts are needed to express true love.

So as you make up your holiday card list, keep track of something besides who sent you a card last year: do a double check to ensure that you have a full range of personalities and talents among your informal creative team’s members. See if you have someone on your list for each of these 12 characteristics:

  • Artistic
  • Funny
  • Inventive
  • Stylish
  • Adventurous
  • Well-Read
  • Diverse
  • Quirky
  • Playful
  • Spontaneous
  • Curious
  • Pop-Cultured

If there’s a creative talent missing on your team, resolve to identify a new team member in the new year that expresses their creativity in that manner. And if you don’t have a creative team you can reach out to, start building it! You’ll truly love the impact that it will have on you!  – Mike Brown

If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on creativity, strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I was struggling recently to pull together slides for a branding presentation – an effort requiring only a little strategic thought and creativity. But several attempts at starting were relatively fruitless. Even though I’d set aside focused time to do the project, it was impossible to progress.

At the same time, another project was pending; it had to be completed so that the next person in the process could begin. With that project lingering, I forced myself into the mode of answering questions, closing down potential options, and repeating the mantra, “Better done than perfect.” After a day’s worth of work, there was tremendous relief in finally signing off on that project and emailing it to the person looking for the results.

Then with a brief mental break from the computer, selecting the slides for the presentation became a snap; it was finished in 90 minutes!

As much as I thought that I had the creative depth to move both efforts ahead virtually simultaneously, I couldn’t. The creative reserves necessary for the project didn’t leave enough free space in my mind to work on the presentation.

So the next time the strategic and creative juices aren’t there for a project, ask yourself, “Is there something else hanging over my head?” If there is, see if you can take the steps to get the “something else” completed or delegated to someone else so that you have the max headroom for creativity.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Too many research reports are a jumble of charts, arrows, and statements that simply play back what’s on the graphic (or worse, just regurgitate a chart’s methodology). For senior executives, that translates into a confusing (and at best, boring) jumble of information – pointing in all kinds of directions without really telling them anything.

If you have research responsibility, apply this maxim for great strategic thinking from Gary Singer, a wonderful strategist and the Chief Strategy Officer at Interbrand. His comment to me was:

  • Good researchers go to the edge of the data and step back – to be cautious & statistically sound.
  • Good consultants go to the edge of the data and stop – to be sure they’re on solid footing & that the client will buy off.
  • Great strategic thinkers go to the edge of the data, formulate a sound next set of assumptions that the audience can comment on & agree to, and then keep going to expand understanding & get to revealing insights.

It’s a simple statement and hard to do, but done successfully, it promises incredible business results. Use it as your new strategic hurdle to clear!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The end of the year used to be a rather slack time at work. That changed about a dozen years ago, and ever since, December has been one of the most frantic times of the year. Add to that the holiday rush, and it all adds up to a lot of to-do’s that need prioritization.

Here’s an alternative that’s helpful when you have many other people depending directly on the completion of your to-do’s so that they can take action.

Instead of using the typical importance vs. urgency prioritization, create a grid that pairs urgency (how soon the to-do needs to get done) with the degree to which someone else is depending on the to-do as a next step for them (great dependency to little dependency). Now place each of your to-do items on this grid, thinking about near-term items that others are really depending on as a first priority.

Using this approach will give you a little different picture of your priorities, as you orient your to-do list to the importance of helping others first. And that’s what the holidays are all about!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Dear Kids,

Just like your management team at work, Santa’s very busy this time of year, and while he’d love to spend time with each letter, there are only so many hours in the work day.

Want to make sure Santa gets the point of your request so that you’re not disappointed this holiday season? Take a tip from “Winning with the P&G 99: 99 Principles and Practices of Procter Gambles Success” by Charles Decker and send him a brief (one-page at most) recommendation making it clear very quickly to Santa how good you’ve been and what you’d like. Here’s the 4-section recommendation format to use:

  1. Brief Background – Provide a quick overview of the issue that your recommendation is addressing so that your boss (I mean Santa) knows what you’re covering.
  2. Recommendation – Clearly & succinctly state what you think should be done.
  3. Rationale – List the reasons that support why the thing that you think should happen should happen.
  4. Next Actions – If the recommendation’s accepted, list out the next things that have to take place.

Let’s apply the approach (sans the headers that you’d use in a business memo) to our holiday letter:

Dear Santa,

I just wanted to update you on what a good boy I’ve been this year and suggest a gift that would truly be appreciated.

This Christmas, I recommend that you bring me a new tablet computer.

This gift is warranted because I’ve really tried to help my wife more around the house this year, including yard work (which I really don’t like). The tablet computer would allow me the flexibility to work on this blog while away from home, to stay in contact with friends and loved ones, to get work done on airplanes more easily, and to draw cartoons for my presentations.

If you agree that a tablet computer makes sense as a gift, please deliver it on the evening of December 24 in Hays, KS, where we’ll be celebrating Christmas with my family. Thank you, and please let me know if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
Mike

So there you have it kids. In fewer than a dozen lines, we’ve made our recommendation and laid out the best case. Try it with Santa AND try it at the office. It really works in cutting through the clutter and getting to decisions faster.

Btw – if you’re still doing holiday shopping, Amazon lists copies of the “P&G 99” for $1.89. That’s less than 2 cents per principle or practice – you won’t find a cheaper gift that will so dramatically improve your staff’s performance this coming year! Order now!!!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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