Brainzooming – All Posts | The Brainzooming Group - Part 321 – page 321
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Visiting Disney World in the mid 1990’s, a rule was communicated several times while waiting in long, unwieldy lines for rides: Move up and fill all available space. That was much more easily done for an adult couple (such as my wife and me) than for a large group. Following this guidance created a great benefit as we shaved at least an hour or two off our wait times over the course of several days (and created only one small incident with a father at It’s a Small World).

It strikes me that the same opportunity is true in business – smaller, more nimble players should be better able to identify market gaps and move into them than their bigger competitors.

I was in Orlando recently, but didn’t get a chance to go the parks. Nevertheless, this photo taken at an Orlando Airport Burger King rekindled the lesson and prompts a question – how many artificial “lines” do we wait in all the time without seeing or sensing the opportunity to step to the right or left and move up?

So next time you or your business feel stymied and tired of looking at the back of heads, ask yourself, “How can I move up and fill all available space?” You’ll be surprised at how often the only thing keeping you waiting in line is you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Today is Ash Wednesday; this marks the beginning of Lent, a time for, among other things, more intense prayer. In light of that, rather than the typical Wednesday feature on Changing Your Character, here’s a link to a creativity prayer.

Invest a few moments today to ask for a potentially new source of help for you to use your creativity to enliven and inspire others.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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You ask, “What’s a Morphfiend?”

You’ve come across them at work; maybe in your personal life as well. A “morphfiend” is someone who continuously changes strategies for the pure pleasure of changing strategy. While they may use this trait to appear adaptable, it’s clear that they’re so willing to change strategies because they have no real strategic underpinning from which to make decisions.

Suspect you may be working with a morphfiend? See how many of these questions you can answer “YES” to for the suspect. Are they always:

  • Quoting from the latest fad management book…until the next fad management book comes along from which to quote?
  • Claiming sole responsibility for strategy – as in, “I don’t need anyone else focusing on strategy; I just need them to execute”?
  • Making ­absolute pronouncements about what they WILL or WON’T do. Except they usually soon STOP what they were DOING, and DO the things that they’d NEVER DO.
  • In continual “hurry up, then slow down” mode, issuing poorly though-out directives that are rescinded when it’s quickly clear that they won’t work?
  • Expecting subordinates to be order takers on their strategic directives, while in turn being an order taker for their own boss’ directives?

If you could answer YES to three or more characteristics, you have enough evidence to convict – you’re working with a morphfiend. The punishment, unfortunately, is done by you and others around the morphfiend. What can you do for the good of the business to combat the negative implications of a morphfiend? Here’s a possible approach:

  • Build an informal affiliation with others who share concerns about your strategic direction’s stability.
  • Hypothesize on what the business’ most successful strategic foundation likely is/should be.
  • Stay a step ahead – read the newest fad management book, identifying how you can tie the book’s principles to the strategic hypotheses you’ve formulated.
  • Engage the morphfiend with as many people as possible sharing a consistent strategic message couched in fad management speak. Do this to try to “own” the morphfiend’s strategic perspective through sheer volume of consistent messaging that sounds like it fits with their own strategic view.

Will it work? Sometimes – I’ve seen it both work and fail depending on the circumstances. But short of resigning yourself to faux strategy that continues to ping pong, it’s likely your best shot.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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One more tip for presentations (and for everyday business speak) is to avoid business cliches. An email last week from Dow Jones pointed to its recent review of the most overused phrases by continent. There are interesting similarities among the cliches used around the world, and it’s well worth checking out the pdf.

My thought? At the end of the day…go home, spend time with your family, say your prayers, and go to bed!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’ve seen a variety of presenters at conferences lately – both good (a few) and bad (mostly). Based on what most bad presenters do, here are four pieces of (apparently) unconventional advice that can lead to dramatic improvements:

  1. Use fewer words on slides. Don’t show every word you plan to say; it’s not that effective of a crutch. Fewer words (or only images) help maintain audience attention & cover your flubs because the audience can’t compare what you’re saying to everything on the screen.
  2. Practice less – and listen more. Record your presentation and listen to it. Hear what isn’t working, and fix it before you present. Reading your presentation over and over without listening to it causes you to miss obvious gaffes that listeners will readily hear.
  3. Cut back on multimedia & animation. Using various sounds, moving images, and videos won’t fix a poor presenter. It just puts more pressure on you to hit cues – the last thing you should have to be thinking about while presenting.
  4. Have fun – but if you’re scared or not funny, don’t throw one joke in to lighten things up. One funny comment reminds the audience how unamusing the rest of it is. A better strategy: smile throughout and quit trying to be funny if you aren’t in real life. Audiences are more forgiving of an underdog who looks genuine and friendly than somebody who is trying to be slick but isn’t.

All of these should save prep time that you can use to ensure you know the content and can talk about it conversationally, even without PowerPoint. If you can do that, you’ll deliver a lot better presentation!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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In the movie “Groundhog Day,” an alarm clock starred in several scenes. Since it’s that time of the year, let’s take 90 seconds to extol the virtues of a well-used kitchen timer.

We use a digital kitchen timer extensively in planning sessions, setting time constraints for our exercises. While people may grumble at first, they usually come to appreciate the efficiencies a timer creates. What are the advantages to time constraining strategy generation or ideation? Using a kitchen timer:

  • Shows people that you value their time – setting a time limit helps you get what you want done promptly, thus avoiding running late or coming up short relative to your session objectives.
  • Creates a sense of urgency – a time constraint and an aggressive goal on the number of ideas identified creates healthy pressure to generate, and not debate, new ideas.
  • Sets up the opportunity to look at a situation in multiple ways – it’s much more productive to divide 28 minutes into four different 7-minute exercises than a single effort. Doing so allows you to vary the perspectives from which you’re addressing your challenge, yielding a stronger set of possibilities.
  • Forces decisions during an evaluation phase – even if you’re discussing ideas to be prioritized, timing the activity precludes endless, unproductive debate that won’t materially change the group’s outcomes.

So here’s to the basic, digital kitchen timer coming out from the shadows to gain its rightful place as a strategic planning tool. I’ve got mine babe!*

* Click here for our recommended timer – the Taylor 5806

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Throughout January, a number of posts have highlighted potential challenges to consider embracing in 2008 to improve your strategy skills. Here’s a recap of the challenges:

So have you selected one or two to pursue? If so, that’s great.

If not, you still have plenty to time to choose something to work on for the remainder of the year to expand your strategic impact. Best wishes, and please share how it’s going and what you’re learning.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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