Brainzooming – All Posts | The Brainzooming Group - Part 326 – page 326
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Here’s the second installment of one of my favorite posts – the Rules of Can’t Be Right. This edition is focused on written reports. Here are some important checks you can use to spot potential errors:

  • Ask yourself, “What else could this mean?” If you didn’t know what it was saying beforehand, could you really tell someone what your point is?
  • Look at written prose in a different font or format than you originally used to write it. Doing this freshens your eyes to spot mistakes in something that you’ve spent quite a bit of time working on. (It’s amazing how frequently I’ll miss a mistake while writing this blog that becomes readily apparent when it’s published in Blogger with a different look.)
  • When you have a bulleted list, check to see if the beginning words are of the same type (i.e., all verbs, all of the same tense, etc.) and if each line ends in the same way (period, no period).
  • Run the spelling and grammar checkers. Yes, it’s completely basic, but that doesn’t mean people always do it.
  • Print it and read it out aloud. You’ll be surprised to find how fractured something that looks right can sound when you’re speaking it.
  • Have someone else take a look at it. That’s another way to get a fresh set of eyes as a double check. If the person is unfamiliar with the topic, all the better since they won’t subconsciously fix problems that more experienced people might.
  • Ask yourself, “What knowledge am I assuming that the reader has on this topic?” Figure out how you can eliminate the need for the assumption to be necessary by providing the background to understand your material.

Please leave comments with tips you use to double check work and look for mistakes. We’ll run them in a future installment of the rules of CBR.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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During ideation and strategic thinking exercises, we use individual, colorful sticky notes in great quantities to capture new ideas and comments. This contrasts with keeping meeting notes on a single big white easel pad. We employ colorful sticky notes so aggressively because they provide a variety of advantages for strategic thinking exercises through effectiveness and efficiency.

Sticky notes allow:

  • Sustainability – written ideas gain tangibility and “life,” moving beyond dependence on someone remembering the creative idea for something to happen with it.
  • Portability – individual sticky note ideas can be moved from one place to another for sharing, further work, or later electronic capture.
  • Visibility – creative ideas can be displayed on walls in the meeting room so all participants can review and consider them, even if they weren’t in the sub-team that generated the idea.
  • Combinations – in moving an idea written on a sticky note, you can arrange and group multiple ideas to trigger new ideas, develop / clarify emerging themes, or create a natural sequence.
  • Separation – the opposite of combining ideas, a sticky note’s portability allows participants to review ideas and select those they find intriguing and may want to advocate for development.
  • Boundaries – different colors, shapes, and sizes allow you to subtly distinguish between the output of various exercises or teams.
  • Ranking – individual ideas can be placed on a matrix or ranked on a single criterion, allowing a group to interactively and quickly prioritize ideas that are more attractive.
  • Revisiting – because the idea has been given initial tangibility through being written, it can be revisited during or after a session so that opportunities not emerging right away still have the possibility of being identified later.
  • Disposal – you can also easily recycle sticky notes when you’re done with them.

So if you want to help make your ideas stick (and not stick), get yourself some sticky notes.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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In part 2 of using relationship advice columnists for the Change Your Character exercise, here are the recommendations they’d offer for strengthening & maintaining relationships. Once again, identify 3 ideas for each of these pieces of advice that can be applied to improving your customer relationships.
  • Be friends.
  • Make sure that there’s good chemistry.
  • Set realistic expectations.
  • Make sure rules and boundaries are understood.
  • Be willing and open to communication.
  • Listen carefully to each other.
  • Stay connected to each other.
  • Take a class or do other things together.
  • Do the simple things.
  • Celebrate each other.

Next Wednesday, the advice columnists will wrap up by helping fix some problem relationships.

Check out a compilation of “Change Your Character” creative thinking exercises and information on its use.  – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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There have been several posts focusing on collecting and asking great questions. Here’s an opportunity to get a perspective from someone else on the importance of questions to innovation and the use of QuestionBanks, strategic lists of questions designed to stimulate strategic thinking. The manifesto is by Corinne Miller from InnovatingResults! It’s well worth the time to download.

When you’re checking out the “Questionating” manifesto, it’s also a great time to poke around on Change This, a website featuring manifestos on a variety of topics, many of them tied to innovation and strategy. And while you’re there, vote on proposed manifestos that others would like to submit or really try to change something by proposing a manifesto of your own!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Here’s a link to a very beneficial marketing strategy article appearing recently on Arkansasbusiness.com. It’s by Jim Karrh, Ph.D. who is senior vice president of Advantage Communications Inc. in Little Rock. I met Jim this past November when he was a speaker and honorary chairman of The CMO Summit.

In this article, Jim focuses the breadth of marketing strategy literature on a set of “Super Six” questions addressing direction, segments, markets, products, and competitors that you can use as a check-up on your brand’s current strategies.

For the rest of his 2008 columns, Jim will focus on tactics to carry out successful strategies. To keep up to date with his thinking, add Jim’s column to your reader: http://www.arkansasbusiness.com/rss/karrh.aspx

Thanks Jim for the great questions!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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So much of solid strategic thinking is determined by perspective and enhanced by your ability to become comfortable with considering different views of the same situation.

For a bit of a different take on that principle, check out this website (http://www.michaelbach.de/ot/index.html) which contains more than seventy visual illusions. It will help you become more comfortable with the idea that just because you see something one way doesn’t mean that you couldn’t see it in a completely different way within an instant.

Optical Illusions & Visual Phenomena by Michael Bach

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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