2

“How to Brand a Company – 7 Types of Brand Language You Should Use” is one of the most popular Brainzooming articles of the past couple years. This branding strategy article looks at seven different types of language (Simple, Emotional, Aspirational, Unusual, Connectable, Open, and Twistable) a brand should be using to fully communicate its brand promise, benefits, and overall messaging.

I received a tweet the other day asking for successful examples to back up the seven types of brand language identified in the post. Since I was working on a presentation I needed to complete ASAP, I was more than happy to abandon the presentation deadline and throw together an immediate answer to the tweet.

Yes, I clearly have a “focus” issue, but that’s a topic for another day.

Brand Language Examples

I created a quick grid (of course), and started filling in examples of each type of language, from both my own recollection and a few listings of popular advertising slogans.

7 Brand Langauage Examples

While not going for an exhaustive list of brand language examples, I noticed after tweeting off the jpeg of the table that “Just do it” from Nike showed up in two areas – both Simple and Aspirational.

Nike-Just-Do-It

Going back through the list of seven types of brand language, however, it seems that “Just do it” could also fit in several others:

  • Emotional (There is definitely an emotional component depending on its use)
  • Open (The phrase can mean multiple things from both a brand and a consumer perspective)
  • Twistable (It could be used as an admonition to someone else, a personal pep talk, plus serving as a brand promise)

The leaves only Unusual and Connectable as gaps for “Just do it.” While it’s never going to be unusual, it COULD be used in a Connectable fashion. One example would be to insert sports actions (i.e., slug, slam, dunk, pass, hurdle, putt, etc.) in place of “do.”

The Best Brand Language

This exploration raised two questions:

  1. Are there any other examples of brand language that uses five of the brand language types, and are there any that use more?
  2. If no other slogan checks off five different types of brand language on its own, does that mean “Just do it” is the best brand language ever?

I’d love to hear your thoughts about whether any other brand’s language works harder than “Just do it” does for Nike?

Because if there is one, I can’t name it. – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

“That was a big focus group.”

This comment was from Nancy Rosenow, executive director of Nature Explore, about a large-scale Brainzooming creative thinking session we designed and facilitated for its annual Leadership Institute.

A new type of focus group was what the large-scale creative thinking session was, even though it took place in the midst of a professional development conference.

The Case for a New Type of Focus Group

If you think about a traditional focus group, it’s an odd environment.

You bring individual groups of recruited strangers together who share some common characteristics (usually including geography) to react to pre-developed ideas or concepts. While they may engage in a brief group activity about the concepts, the main communication is usually one person reacting to what the focus group moderator or another participant has said. That result is a lot of one-person talking, everyone else listening, and relatively inefficient learning experience.

At the Brainzooming sessions we designed and facilitated the Leadership Institute (and for a similar one the previous day for KC Digital Drive), we created a different experience for participants with varied strategic thinking exercises designed specifically for them.

While we had geographically diverse individuals working together in four-to-six person groups, there were nearly twenty of those groups active simultaneously. With no dedicated facilitators for the groups, we had had staff from the organization walking among the tables to answer questions and provide creative encouragement.

Nature-Explore-Session

We accomplished this with a poster-based set of strategic thinking exercises. Participants could weigh in on three topics of interest to event organizers:

  1. What opportunities and challenges the attendees foresaw in creating and maintaining outdoor classrooms (the focus of the Institute)
  2. Attendee reactions nearly forty potential topics for educational modules
  3. Ways attendees would change their selected modules to make them more helpful

The net result a tremendous volume of input from the diverse participants, and all it took was approximately 45 minutes of event time for participants.

Strategic Thinking Exercises Designed for Broad Input

If you have a large group of your target audience members assembled, this about the value of a new type of focus group. You’ll get more people (who are both fundamental similarities and stark differences) working together, generating ample content through multiple periods of intense, collaborative interaction as they work on new ideas.

Sound intriguing?

Give me a call or email, and let’s discuss how we can make it happen for your organization! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

1

Today’s post is simply silly. Even sillier than anything we’ve ever done before.

If you want serious, come back tomorrow.

Last night, as the close to the first day of Content Marketing World, there was a fun party at Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica.

COntent-Marketing-World-FLo

I wasn’t exactly sure if Nautica was the aquarium, a marina, or simply the orange clothing sponsor of Content Marketing World. Nevertheless, it was several hundred attendees at Content Marketing World noshing from local Cleveland food trucks, drinking adult beverages (the Smurf vodka-based drink was especially good), and enjoying a Beatles tribute band.

Beatles-Tribte

Speaking of Beatles tribute bands, here are the top ten things to enjoy and watch for whenever you see a Beatles tribute band (I warned you this was a silly post):

  1. The age range of the people drawn to a Beatles tribute band is remarkable. There were young women in their twenties who knew the lyrics to every song.
  2. For as long as I was there, this group never really moved beyond the first few years of The Beatles. And that was perfectly okay, except I’d hoped they’d do “Long Tall Sally.” And “Kansas City” would have been a nice touch.
  3. The quote of the night came from Elton Mayfield of ER Marketing: “If the Paul isn’t left handed (in a Beatles tribute band), you just have a guy in a costume.”
  4. Ringo didn’t sing a lot of songs, but at least the early songs Ringo sang were pretty rocking.
  5. Elton Mayfield saw Paul McCartney in Kansas City earlier this year and reported Paul is 72. I think the Paul in the Beatles tribute band with the young looking wig was close to 72 as well.
  6. I’m one (two at the most) degrees of separation away from the real Paul McCartney. It hasn’t translated into any business or personal benefits, however.
  7. This particular Beatles tribute band has been on tour for 31 years. I’m hard pressed to think of any other example of replacement parts lasting more than three times the original.
  8. You can’t go wrong with donuts covered in powdered sugar, even if they weren’t hot. Definitely, you should always go for the powdered sugar donuts. (Not technically about The Beatles cover band, but it was an important part of the evening.)
  9. When a Beatles tribute band play a George song, that’s when everyone goes to the bathroom.
  10. I can sway to a Beatles song, but that’s about it. I definitely can’t dance, even to The Beatles, but if someone asks me, I’ll try.

And that’s the dispatch from the first evening of Content Marketing World! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

1

Give someone an incredible creative idea, and you’ve solved a problem or opportunity for the day. Give someone incredible creative thinking questions, and you’ve prepared them to capitalize on opportunities for a lifetime!

Creative-Thinking-Question

Since we want you to have a lifetime of ideas and success, here are all kinds of Brainzooming creative thinking questions waiting to be used on problems or opportunities you’re confronting today, tomorrow, and for the rest of your life.

Fundamental Creativity Questions

Extreme Creativity

Naming

Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

1

woody-bendleThe last few days, I’ve been enjoying some incredible BBQ ribs from customer experience strategy and innovation expert Woody Bendle.

And let me tell you: as smart as Woody is about branding and innovation, he’s just as great making ribs! I paired Woody’s ribs with barbeque sauce my wife makes from the recipe at the restaurant my parents used to own, and WOW!

Even though I can’t share the ribs with all of you, they inspired me to put together a retrospective of Woody’s blog posts on Brainzooming. He’s always a popular guest author, and since he hasn’t been able to write as much for the Brainzooming blog this year, I wanted to make sure our newest readers knew about all of Woody’s great content.

So without delay, dive in to Woody’s great strategic thinking, while I have one more meal of diving into Woody’s great barbeque!

Brand Strategy

Customer Focus and Customer Experience

Innovation

Strategic Thinking and Creative Thinking

Business Rants

Potpourri

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

2

It never fails.

If I am creating a new presentation, I go through the same tortured creative thinking stages EVERY TIME.

As I pass the various STAGES, they always feel familiar based on past experiences.

Yet no matter how much creative thinking I do or how much I recognize the stages and WANT to skip over those that cause the most frustration and anxiety, I repeat them every time while creating a new presentation.

image

Creative Thinking Stages for a New Presentation

After seeing how my last new version of a presentation went, and in the midst of creating not one new presentation, but working on three new presentations this past week, I listed these twenty-five stages of creative thinking in the hopes of avoiding the most painful ones.

I am not sure that hope will ever come to fruition, but at least now, there is a road map to know where I am at in the twenty-fives stages of creating a new presentation.

  1. I’m tired of all the old presentations, so how about creating a new presentation?
  2. What have I gotten myself into here?
  3. This outline for the new presentation came together pretty easily.
  4. I have a lot of previous material I can reuse.
  5. There’s so much raw material here it’s tough to wade through and get it organized.
  6. I should perform some secondary research to test my ideas.
  7. There are a lot of other people already addressing this, and they’re probably smarter and have better experience than I do.
  8. I’ve got a mess on my hands and the original outline for the new presentation doesn’t make sense anymore.
  9. Maybe it would work to start over, do some more creative thinking, and develop a new outline in PowerPoint.
  10. The new presentation outline seems to work, of course, there isn’t a strong beginning or end, so now it’s just a matter of moving SOME of the big file of content into the new PowerPoint.
  11. I don’t have nearly enough material to fill the time.
  12. I’m going to have to develop a whole new handout, and who has time for that?
  13. I just got the attendee list, and EVERYBODY who’s coming to this session already knows WAY MORE than I do.
  14. This shorter version is finally starting to make some sense.
  15. With the beginning added, the new presentation feels good.
  16. Looking at it now, this new presentation is about 20% too long so I’m going to have to cut some slides.
  17. I really don’t have a lot of this content committed to memory, so I had better listen to recordings of similar content I’ve already presented.
  18. There are several stories from those recordings that should go into this presentation.
  19. The new presentation is close, but going back through the attendee list, I’m still not sure what they’re going to learn.
  20. I’ll work through the notes on the plane there.
  21. After hand writing my notes on the plane, this new presentation really clicks, especially after a few more tweaks.
  22. Sitting here the night before, it’s still way too long and the ideas aren’t meaty enough for these attendees.
  23. Going through the presentation last night, I fell asleep because it was so boring to me, so it’s going to be boring for the attendees.
  24. It’s time to give the new presentation, so we’ll just have to see how it goes.
  25. That went REALLY well.

With the new presentations I’ve been creating the last week, I’m at around stages ten through thirteen on all of them.

I have a long way and a short time to go until stage twenty-five.

Wish me the best! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

Opening a Can of Creative Thinking Worms

What’s the opposite of “opening up a can of worms”? Fishing? Closing the can of worms? Picking the best worms and doing something really incredible with them? Finishing what you start? I don’t know the right answer, but it seems like with a little creative thinking we should be able to figure it out . . . Social media is celebrated as a young person’s game, which maybe it is. Or maybe it isn’t . . . There’s more value to having patience on your side than having time on your side, even if it doesn’t seem like it right now.

Clementine-toidy

Even if no one else cares, it’s wonderful to have a cat who cares about purring for you enthusiastically . . . If you are struggling for content ideas, write out a list of the untold stories in your life. There will be incredible content ideas in that list, guaranteed . . . When you meet someone entirely new who starts sharing the same points of view you have completely unprompted, you have to take notice and figure out how you should be working together . . . If you need a laugh today, watch “Word Crimes” from Weird Al Yankovic. It’s hilarious on the surface, and even better for some of the very subtle shots it takes at other performers.

It’s a sad statement about the times in which we live when dumb gets more attention than sensible. Social media isn’t completely to blame, bsocial media has allowed dumb stuff to be broadcast 24/7 . . . There’s great value in learning when you can and SHOULD simply “wing it” . . . If bizarre situations and people were really as common place and important as the media (including social media) would have you believe, the media wouldn’t be covering them . . . Even though I hear some people using them interchangeably, there’s a difference between “collaboration” and “corroboration.”

jump-orange-shoes

Might as well jump, but into what? . . . Going to bed with loud rain and thunder is like getting a recording filled with storm sounds completely free . . . I go through the same stages of anxiety in creating every new presentation or workshop. Still haven’t found the formula to break that creative pattern, but I’m working on it . . . We used to eat at restaurants with paper table coverings, and I’d show up with a Sharpie marker (and maybe even crayons) to illustrate our dinner. Somewhere along the line that stopped, and I miss that creative pursuit. That needs to change and soon! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading