Creativity | The Brainzooming Group - Part 133 – page 133
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This is part 2 of highlighting some of the creative inspirations behind my presentation on “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation.” As the first reference below suggests, improving your creativity is linked to your ability to change, adapt, and customize various inspirations to address your opportunities.

  • The Remix Planet – My wife Cyndi wanted to go to Wired Magazine’s NextFest in Chicago in 2005. The admission included a free one-year subscription; one of the first issues featured the “Remix Planet.” This provided a nice way to talk about borrowing & morphing ideas for your own use!
  • Steve Farber – Steve is a great speaker that we’ve had for several executive management programs. He talked about reading magazines on the cutting edge (i.e. gaming, technology) to spot emerging trends headed for the general culture. We morphed the idea into taking any graphics-intensive magazine outside your field of expertise and looking through it page-by-page with a marker, writing down new ideas to address your challenges.
  • IDEO –A well-known design & innovation firm. One of the companies I work with did some brief exploration with IDEO. One of their approaches is prototyping – quickly doing something with an idea to make it more tangible and to be able to experience it. That’s been helpful in moving us beyond simply generating a bunch of ideas for a marketing manager and instead prioritizing them quickly and taking the first few steps with them.
  • “Made to Stick” – I’ve written about “Made to Stick” previously. Its six principles for making ideas take hold and flourish can benefit anyone trying to create change and implement new approaches.
  • Benjamin Zander – I’ve also written about Benjamin Zander earlier. Specific to “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation,” his discussion about simply replying “How Fascinating” to things that go wrong in life had a major impact. My natural personality is to become frustrated and complain when things don’t work. Zander’s challenge to identify what you’re learning from a bad situation has helped me to be calmer when things are frustrating and to genuinely look for the lessons God is trying to teach me when nothing seems to be going right. Click here for a blog post from PresentationZen with a quick overview of Zander’s key messages.
  • Serving Others & Helping to Make Them Successful – I’m an ardent believer in servant leadership. While the Bible is certainly the chief inspiration for that approach to life, the idea of improving your successfulness by figuring out how to make other people successful comes from Ziz Ziglar, an incredible speaker.

Which leads to a big thank you to Jessica Myers, a senior media relations specialist at Garmin, for the inspiration to start a blog. I saw her present at an IABC Communications Summit in October 2007 on how easy it is to get a blog started. I thought I’d check it out, and was launched into the blogosphere.

That’s how a presentation comes together, with a tremendous number of great inputs & ideas that get molded (ideally) into a cohesive message. Enjoy checking out the links as potential departure points for your own new inspirations. And realize – it’s actually more creative to REMEMBER your sources. That way you can go back and borrow from them again and again!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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A comment on Jan Harness’ Creative Instigation blog struck me as interesting: “Creativity is the art of forgetting your sources.” In the age of the remix culture, that’s very true, and I’ve been accused of it in presentations. While I try to credit sources of inspiration, you don’t often get to explain why something inspired you.

Saturday, I did “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation”for a great conference audience. Since that presentation is all about creativity, I thought I’d try to RECOGNIZE some of the inspirations behind that material over the next two posts. Here’s part 1 – check these out and see if they can help remove some NOs from your InNOvation efforts.

    • Max Utsler – In 2004, Max asked me to talk to his Kansas University class about innovation in marketing communications. That was the start – no Max, no presentation.

 

 

 

  • Chuck Dymer – I met Chuck in the mid 1990’s, and he’s been an incredible strategic & innovation mentor to me ever since. He’s a Master Trainer of Edward de Bono (the father of lateral thinking) methods who continually opens my eyes to new ways to think creatively. You name it – trait transformation, themed exercises, using toys, prioritization grids, plus-minus-interesting…I learned it all from Chuck!

 

 

  • James Lipton – As a collector of great questions, I love James Lipton’s segment on Inside The Actor’s Studio where he asks his guests the same questions about themselves eac show. His references to Bernard Pivot using the questions on French TV prompted some background research. There’s an interesting little history to the questionnaire that highlights that great questions always have a place.
  • Greenhousing – Chuck Dymer gave me a book from ?What If!, a UK-based innovation company. In it, they address greenhousing ideas, i.e. creating an environment that allows new ideas to grow & develop when they are at their most vulnerable. It’s includes questions to ask about new ideas that are certainly more productive than what I had typically been asking, “Why the *#!% do you want to do that?” Hey, we can all change!
  • Diet Dr. Pepper – My mom drank Dr. Pepper when I was growing up, setting the stage for me loving Dr. Pepper (now Diet Dr. Pepper). We never knew why, but when I was little, Dr. Pepper bottles were always sticky on the outside. Years later, the economist at work told me that he had previously worked at a Dr. Pepper bottling plant. Their method to control the volume in the bottles was to tap those on the bottling line that had too much liquid so that they would foam over. Mystery Solved! In any event, Diet Dr. Pepper has become my creative catalyst drink of choice.

 

 

  • “Get Out of the Mental Doldrums NOW!” Card – My Uncle Jerry was the most incredible Monopoly savant that I’ve ever played against. He had the distances memorized between properties, knew all the rents for each number of houses, and frequently bankrupted his competitors within 30 minutes. Suffice it to say, at that rate, we played a lot of Monopoly games over the course of an afternoon. This fueled my love for the game, and when trying to come up with a leave behind for the InNOvation presentation, the Get out of Jail Free card came right to mind.

 

In part 2, you’ll learn more about the creative inspirations behind “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation.”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Two celebrities have become well-known for being able to reinvent themselves when they hit a financial or creative dead end –Donald Trump and Madonna. You can go to school on their rebranding techniques and apply them in business when you have a brand that needs to be refreshed. Here are approaches they’ve used successfully that you can apply in the Change Your Character exercise.

Donald Trump:

  • Host a TV show
  • Fix your financial situation
  • Put your name on something new
  • Do a BIG deal
  • Fire somebody
  • Start a new TV season
  • Pick a verbal fight with another celebrity to generate attention
  • Change out the important people in your life
  • Redevelop a prominent property

Madonna:

  • Change your look
  • Change your wardrobe
  • Do something controversial
  • Explore a new style of work / expression
  • Create news through your unusual lifestyle
  • Use multiple media to get your message across
  • Write a book
  • Incorporating new cultures or points of view
  • Adopt a child

So try these approaches as you brainstorm how to get your brand back in the news and to the top of the charts in customers’ eyes.

Check out a compilation of “Change Your Character” creative thinking exercises and information on its use.  – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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A great technique to generate new creative ideas is delegating your challenge to someone else…say, Mary Ann or Ginger or the Professor from “Gilligan’s Island.” Too good to be true? It’s not. Here’s how it works:

  • State the business challenge that you’re addressing – it could be an opportunity, a problem, a new process or approach, etc.
  • Pick who you want to have work on your situation. This could be a real person, a fictional or cartoon character, or even another business.
  • Once you’ve identified who you’ll put on the job, list 8 to 10 approaches that the person, character, or business uses to address opportunities or challenges.
  • Using each of the 8 to 10 approaches, apply them to your situation to generate at least 3 new creative ideas for solving it. The result should be at least 30 new ideas to consider for your situation. (For ways to prioritize, check out this earlier post on narrowing ideas.)

The reason that the seven castaways are such good people to delegate to is because they are so different (thus approaching challenges differently) and still relatively well-known as pop culture icons.

Typical approaches that surface for the castaways to address situations include:

  • Make something out of coconuts & bamboo (whatever is available)
  • Create a new invention
  • Perform an experiment
  • Plot an elaborate plan
  • Get somebody else to do your work for you
  • Play / act out a different character
  • Flirt with someone (use your talents to get your way)
  • Pay money to get what you want
  • Sleep with a Teddy Bear (do something to improve comfort)
  • Look out for the benefit of others

You can use this technique in many situations to help you generate new creative ideas from very different perspectives!

Check out a compilation of “Change Your Character” creative thinking exercises and information on its use.  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Auguste Escoffier, a nineteenth-century French food connoisseur, popularized the idea that something should be served between main courses in a formal meal to clear the palate, allowing the diner to fully enjoy the next course as if it were the first. Because of his efforts, lemon sorbet has become the popular means to cleanse palates.

A Creative Thinking Lemon Sorbet

The idea translates to creative thinking also. As many topics as we generally have thrown at us to process mentally, it becomes difficult to move between them with the expectation that you’ll start the next project with the same creative thinking freshness as the first.

Can you identify your “creative thinking” lemon sorbets – the activities or exercises you can use to clear your mind when shifting between creative (or not-so-creative efforts)?

They may be simple (going for a quick walk or taking a nap) or more challenging to accomplish (one of mine is riding roller coasters, which unfortunately happens infrequently). Make the effort to identify a repertoire of activities you can use to effectively clear your mind, refresh, and get ready for more productive creative thinking.

As for me, I’ll be having an icy Diet Dr. Pepper and a quick nap on the floor to clear my mind before starting on tomorrow’s Brainzooming blog post! – Mike Brown

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’ve never been big on New Year’s resolutions for a variety of reasons that I’ll spare you. Suffice it to say in the past couple of years, I’ve tried to do a better job of personally committing a few overall goals to writing – albeit written during the Christmas holiday on a bunch of 25 year old note cards still in my room at my parent’s house.

Nevertheless, throughout January we’ll sprinkle in a few lessons and underlying challenges to consider while improving your strategic thinking & innovation successes in the new year. No need to take them all on or to report back on how you’re doing, but read them, grab the immediate learnings, and pick one or two of the challenges to work on throughout the year.

The first one is “Finding a Strategic Thinking Mentor.”

A mentor can be invaluable for any business person as part of your informal business team, providing a different and more experienced perspective than you’d have on your own. Not all mentors are suited to fill every role, so it’s beneficial to have various mentors to satisfy specific experience gaps.

Here’s Your Challenge – Do you have a strategic thinking mentor – one who can help you identify the things that matter in your business situation and provide new insights & perspectives on how to approach things innovatively? When seeking one out, look for the following characteristics – beyond those that any great mentor possesses. The best strategic thinking mentors are:

  • Smart
  • Experienced & diverse
  • Adept at asking productive, probing questions
  • Oriented toward innovation
  • Gifted with perceptive, accurate instincts
  • Able to identify “what matters” in a particular situation
  • Visionary
  • Open to challenging both you and the status quo
  • Comfortable holding a contradictory view
  • Able to make solid, insightful connections

I’ve had several great strategic mentors, two of whom I was able to spend time with over the holidays. One is Bill McDonald, my first boss in a professional job, at Kansas City Infobank. It would take pages to list what I learned from Bill about strategy, secondary research, and great business writing. Another is Greg Reid, who I met eleven years ago today and has been a wonderful strategic thinking mentor ever since.

Strategic mentors are out there – find one of your very own this year! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at  816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Holidays often present our most memorable experiences because of the emotional range they touch – whether positive or negative. The strong emotional connections coupled with the high degree of personal interest in holidays fixes long ago memories in our minds as if they happened yesterday.

When we’re presenting ideas in business though, we usually don’t think about this relationship that creates holiday memories:

Memorability = Degree of Personal Interest x Intensity of Emotions
At best, business presentations assume some implied level of personal interest (since after all, it’s a business topic) and stop short of including any emotion (since after all, it’s a business topic). When you work through the formula above for most business presentations (Minimal personal interest x Zero emotion), you get NO memorability.

For your next business communication, use the formula to your advantage by thinking through and incorporating answers to the following questions when developing and delivering ideas.

To increase personal interest, for each person in the audience answer:

  • What about the business is important either as a motivator (opportunities, cost savings, satisfying customers, increasing stock price, etc.) or as a fear (competitors, losing customers, deteriorating EPS, etc.) for this person?
  • From what perspective does this person think about the business, and how does that shape their information processing and decision making?
  • What words do they use to talk about the business?
  • What are their most important personal motivators (advancement, looking good, being smart, etc.) and fears (losing a job, looking bad, being dumb, etc.)?

To increase the emotional connection of your presentation, think about how you could use:

  • Surprise – is there a different way to order or communicate the content to be more surprising?
  • Drama – would making it a suspenseful story or acting out part of it add a beneficial sense of drama?
  • Humor – if the information is challenging, can you use humor (maybe a funny cartoon or story) to help reduce defensiveness?
  • Excitement – is there an alternative format (movie clip, audience participation) that would be more exciting than Powerpoint?

One final consideration in seeking a more emotional connection – how receptive is your organization to incorporating an emotional angle and how will you signal what you’re doing? Both points are important so that you are bringing your audience along with you to get the maximum positive impact.

So back to holiday memorability. It’s late December – Christmas, Kwanza, and New Year’s are coming up; Hanukkah is over. I’ll stop focusing on creating business memories and get started on holiday memories if you’ll do the same! But let’s meet back here right after the first of the year. Have a blessed holiday season full of wonderful memories!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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