Creativity | The Brainzooming Group - Part 2 – page 2
0

Do your organization’s strategic planning meetings turn into annual snoozefests?

That happens when strategic planning becomes too complex, gets detached from real business issues, or the whole process focuses on trying to complete cumbersome strategy templates. Then people start dozing off. Later you discover that your strategic planning was more successful at producing ZZZZZZZZZZs than $$$$$$$$$s.

Yes, strategic planning processes are commonly snoozefests, but they needn’t be!

To avoid it, it’s vital to break out of the typical strategic planning process formula where it’s all about the same old people, the same old strategy exercises, and the same old expectations to just get a plan done so it can sit on the shelf with other strategies while the organization keeps doing the same old things.

If you’ve been frustrated in your efforts to challenge the strategic planning status quo, we have good news: There’s hope, and you can change all the bad things about how a boring strategic planning process! There are actually many fun strategic planning ideas that you can start implementing for next year’s planning!

Step one in the process is to download 11 Ideas for Fun Strategic Planning! This eBook has become a go-to guide for thousands of executives globally to explore fun strategic planning ideas. You can use this eBook to enliven strategy meetings through a focus on important business issues, productive strategy exercises, and enough fun to keep EVERYONE engaged in creating a plan that creates success and all those other things that more $$$$$$$$$$s create.

If you don’t have 11 Ideas for Fun Strategic Planning, get your copy today!

New Call-to-action

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

We’ve talked here about how Idea Magnets make life more exciting, fulfilling and successful, thanks in large part to their unflagging creativity.

Yeah, about that: it only appears to be unflagging.

It flags, my friends. It absolutely flags.

But Idea Magnets know this, and expect it, and they have ways of addressing it. In her seminal book on the subject of creativity, The Artist’s Way, author Julia Cameron (affiliate link) refers to this concept as “filling the well.” To put it simply: repeated output results in depletion. In order to create, we require creative fuel.

I found this book during my first year of college. It completely changed the way I approached my own creativity, and much of that comes down to a commitment to filling the well. Ideally, I replenish my creativity in small, continuous ways. But that’s not always practical. So when I feel that flagging feeling coming on, I choose one (or more) of the items on the list below and apply liberally to the affected area, as it were. When you magnetize your life like this, things get better pretty quickly.

Curate the things that spark your creativity.

Pinterest is an ideal tool for this. If you’re not familiar with Pinterest, it’s a site where you can collect (“pin”) images onto different “pinboards”. You can create as many boards as you’d like, and you can decide what, if any, themes each board follows.

Some of my boards

A look inside one of the boards seen in the previous image.

Of course, you could also opt for a regular, physical scrapbooks using images culled from magazines or anywhere else. Playlists are another great way to curate the music that makes you more creative. Whether you use Spotify, YouTube, or place that needle carefully on a much-loved record, music is excellent for filling the well. Finally, one of my favorite ways to gather the things that stoke my creativity is simply to put pen to paper and list them all. (I’ve done this most of my life; there’s something powerful and exciting about seeing so much potent creativity and joy named on a page in your own handwriting.) A young Nick Cave created the following list of his influencers and sent it to a reporter who’d just interviewed him:

Shift your point of view.

This is something that can be done figuratively — for example, by viewing your situation or project through the eyes of an artist you admire, or literally — by taking a walk and allowing yourself to get “lost” in a place you don’t normally walk through. You can get even more literal by climbing a tree and noting the the things you miss at your usual height, or by lying on the couch, letting your head hang down over one end, and examining your daily view of your home from that angle. It sounds silly. It is silly. But it’s also effective.

Get out of your head.

Do something that requires you to use all of your focus. Painting, woodworking, gardening, knitting, and surfing are all great ways to get out of your head and let your skills and instinct lead you. You might also consider stretching, exercising, meditating, cloudgazing, stargazing, or gazing into a nice roaring fire. Sometimes a vacation from our relentless thinking can work miracles.

Get out…period.

Visit a museum and fill your eyes with art. Get to the beach, the forest, the mountains, the desert, the open field. Breathe. Wander through an estate sale or a thrift shop. Visit a craft store and imagine trying completely new types of projects. Head to your local farmers’ market and take in the sights, sounds, and scents. See what classes are offered in your community and try something you’ve never done before: ikebana, weight lifting, ceramics, Zumba?

Magnetizing Your Life

Ideas can and do come from everywhere. And Idea Magnets need ideas in order to function properly. Our creativity demands it. It needs to roam and gather up fragments of this and that to use as fuel. That’s why practices like these are critical. At first they may feel strange or silly. But you’ll find that as you continue to make it a point to fill the well, you’ll begin attracting more and more ideas, and better ones, too. Idea Magnet to Idea Magnet, I promise you. – Emma Alvarez Gibson

Pre-order Idea Magnets

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

New call-to-action

Idea Magnets is about becoming a more dynamic leader who inspires extreme creativity and innovative success. You’ll learn to envision new creative paths that deliver powerful impact.

The Idea Magnets secret is naturally incorporating these seven strategies into your work and personal life:

  1. Generating Inspiration
  2. Embodying Servant Leadership
  3. Attracting Opposites
  4. Making Unexpected Connections
  5. Encouraging People and Ideas
  6. Implementing for Impact
  7. Recharging Creative Energy

These strategies will strengthen your leadership, attract new ideas and people, and lead to greater fulfillment for you and everyone around you!

Idea Magnets – 7 Strategies for Cultivating & Attracting Creative Business Leaders will be available July 23, 2018.

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

An executive responsible for strategy planning who was downloading our eBook on 11 Fun Strategic Planning Ideas posed an important question: How can you successfully identify and try new ways to get internal groups working together on strategic planning?

We’re always thinking about increasing the strategically combustible human surface area engaged in strategic planning.

What?

In other words: Brainzooming wants as many smart, diverse people working together as we can effectively and efficiently accomplish on any fun strategic planning initiative.

We tend to find that our ambitions for this exceed that of our clients. (See previous Brainzooming article on the damaging lack of diversity in strategic planning workshops.)

7 Ways Groups Can Collaborate on Fun Strategic Planning

Nevertheless, in answer to this new reader’s question on getting internal groups working together, here are seven ideas we’ve either tried, or would in a minute, to maximize internal collaboration and promote fun strategic planning:

  1. Identify all the potential people involved in strategic planning upfront, nothing those who most need to collaborate
  2. Perform a skills, knowledge, and interests inventory of all your strategic planners, then pair people who complement each other based on the assessment
  3. Create a strategic planning event that includes people from multiple groups and features cross-group activities
  4. Employ an ice breaker where people reveal information they know that is helpful to strategic planning that others will be surprised they know
  5. Use assigned seating to nudge people who don’t work together to at least sit together
  6. Create strategy teams with members of various groups that will need to collaborate to complete their assignments
  7. Make sure each planning group identifies all the departments and people critical to success early on, then require that groups reach out to them BEFORE the planning is done

Implementing even a few of these ideas within a strategic planning process that values diversity and broad participation, will make an impact.

Want to talk more how you can translate this approach to strategic planning? Contact us, and we’ll discuss how we’d customize the process steps and participation opportunities to maximize the impact for your brand! – Mike Brown

 

fun-ideas-strategic-planning11 Ideas to Create a Fun Strategic Planning Process!

Yes, strategic planning can be fun . . . if you know the right ways to liven it up while still developing solid strategies! If you’re intrigued by the possibilities, download our FREE eBook, “11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning.”

Download Your FREE eBook! 11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning

Enjoy this article? Subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

We have some popular articles on the Brainzooming website about how to imagine a whole array of cool product names. All those articles relate to the early stages of the product naming process. We’ve done a few things, but not as many, on the decision process for picking the creative and strategic options from all the cool product names you end up imagining.

But yesterday, Emma forwarded a link to one of those maddening slideshow posts on 31 Product Naming Fails.

Clicking through all the slides made me realize: for all the imagination you want to have among the people coming up with cool product names, what you MUST have is an eclectic and perhaps slightly shady set of characters reviewing the potential cool product names to prevent a massive product name fail.

18 Sensibilities to Avoid Massive Cool Product Name Fails

Having personally reviewed each of these incredibly terrible product names, I now share with you the 18 sensibilities you must have on your team to avoid a cool product name fail.
You need individuals who:

  1. Possess a good understanding of interpersonal and solo sexual acts, plus a fascination with all the related jargon of both.
  2. Have insight into fringe communities and what they love, embrace, and abhor.
  3. Love horror – both in movies and IRL.
  4. Understand (and/or will track down) all the ways that words in one language won’t work in other languages.
  5. Have a basic clue about life and no appetite for group think or apparently unstoppable momentum for stupid ideas.
  6. Can go six (or even nine) deep on synonyms describing varied sexual activities.
  7. Fully understand all the mechanisms and terminology of what is popularly known as Number 2.
  8. Are diligent at saying all product names aloud before voting yea or nay.
  9. Understand that there are multiple ways to voice a g, a c, or a k.
  10. Have big enough investments in the brand’s success that they won’t let incredibly funny names that no one seems to get make it out of the room alive.
  11. Put the scat in scatological.
  12. Are willing to tell the boss that the family name should never be placed on a building, box, or label. Or uttered aloud. EVER.
  13. Are automatically suspicious of any abbreviation, acronym, or contraction.
  14. Possesses clairvoyant powers and can predict when a currently okay word or sound will fall flat within a decade.
  15. Have a working knowledge of all global genocides, along with the associated moral issues, slang, and sensitivities related to each one.
  16. Know every nickname and euphemism for genitals, what they produce, and all the activities one (or more) can do with them.
  17. Are savvy enough to flip everything upside down and say words backwards to look for sinister alternative meanings and shapes.
  18. Abhor being too true or too literal in describing a product, what it does, and how it looks.

Of course, it’s possible that you don’t need eighteen people on your cool product name review team, if you have the right people in your organization. Heck, if you hire right, one person may be all you need! And that’s all I’ve got to say about that.  😉  – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

Brainzooming-Before-After

 For More Information |  Phone: 816-509-5320  |  Email: info@brainzooming.com

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

It’s important that a brand strategy lead to displaying your brand personality in a way that fosters affiliation among customers and creates interest with prospects.

That sounds like a mouthful. It also sounds expensive and complicated to do. It definitely can be, but it most certainly doesn’t require an expensive or complicated brand strategy.

Here is a prime example from the grocery store over the weekend.

Among the four pancake mixes, which one stands out?

The three with the flavor variations and the predictable photos of pancake stacks? Or the one with the predictable flavor and the pancake stack that uses bananas, blueberries, and chocolate to make a smiley face on the pancakes?

For me, Bisquick won. It stood out because its stack of pancakes displayed personality.

Think about it. All of the boxes feature a stack of pancakes. All of them required a food photo shoot. Yet only Bisquick made a brand personality statement with its photo. It’s not symmetrical. It’s not the best of the photos. But it’s the only one that brought fun and brand personality to the grocery store aisle.

Which raises the real question for you: How is your brand strategy exploiting every opportunity to add fun and brand personality to boost the attention your brand garners? Well? – Mike Brown

Download our FREE eBook:
The 600 Most Powerful Strategic Planning Questions

Engage employees and customers with powerful questions to uncover great breakthrough ideas and innovative strategies that deliver results! This Brainzooming strategy eBook features links to 600 proven questions for:

  • Developing Strategy

  • Branding and Marketing

  • Innovation

  • Extreme Creativity

  • Successful Implementation


Download Your FREE eBook! The 600 Most Powerful Strategic Planning Questions



Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

There’s a meme — perhaps you know it — in which two stick figures are trying very hard to make plans to get together. Reviewing their calendars, they trade offers and counteroffers until finally they embrace, tearfully, saying, “It was so nice knowing you!” and “I’ll never forget you!”

Adult friendships, it turns out, require a different level of care and persistence. They can be overwrought with complexity.  We’re not often completely sure about its boundaries or rules. We wonder, we worry. And yet we don’t talk about it much.

Enter Randi Buckley and Dyana Valentine.

Last Saturday, I joined forces with these two inimitable women to record episode 3 of their podcast series, The Challenges of Adult Friendships. It’s an ongoing conversation that explores “the terrain, confusion, gravity, importance, grieving, and nuances of adult friendships,” a topic I think about often, and one I was excited to discuss with these two fascinating and brilliant women. We talked about some of the things that happen around the question of, “What if they don’t want to be friends with me?” We also laughed. A lot.

We haven’t yet figured out how to solve the challenges inherent in adult friendships, but there’s something intensely freeing, and–I hope–helpful about this type of discussion. You can listen in to the podcast here — click on episode 3, far right. I’d love to hear your thoughts about the Challenges of Adult Friendships! Emma Alvarez Gibson

Continue Reading