Creativity | The Brainzooming Group - Part 2 – page 2
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We were listening in on an internal innovation strategy call conducted by one of our clients. The team was wrestling with a concern voiced by the organization’s senior leader that its complete innovation portfolio wasn’t capable of yielding the financial impact he is seeking. The key question was, “Where’s the beef with this innovation strategy?”

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The sense of unease among the organization’s innovation team leaders was palpable. They were feeling a need to scramble. They seemed ready to jump through hoops to justify the innovation strategy to the CEO. However, that would have entailed veering from their well-considered implementation plans.

3 Questions When the Innovation Strategy ROI Doesn’t Satisfy the Boss

Before they deviated from their very solid innovation strategy approach (only some of which we helped shape—they’ve been doing great work on their own), I challenged them to consider three questions:

#1. Is there a legitimate basis for the C-Suite challenge to their innovation strategy?

Does the organization truly lack innovation, or is the senior leader lacking awareness and understanding of the work the team has already accomplished? If they can’t answer that question upfront, they risk a lot of potentially unnecessary effort.

#2. Is there a standard methodology for quantifying the impact of the innovation strategy?

If yes, does it support the CEO’s perspective? If there isn’t a standard methodology to project and quantify the innovation strategy impact, it would be a better use of their time to develop one, rather than launching a disruptive CYA effort.

#3. If the team lacks innovation opportunities with a significant financial impact, what can they do to quickly find or create them?

Since it’s far better to scramble for progress than to take a CYA approach, what steps do they need to take to make this happen?

Where do you start looking for the innovation strategy beef?

In a follow-up call, they were still evaluating the need to pump up the number of new ideas to deliver the beef to the CEO.

Hearing they had still not answered these three questions and we’re trying to come up with more ways to generate more ideas, I cautioned them, using an analogy: they should answer the question about where the beef is by going to the fridge and putting a patty on the grill. Instead, they were primed to go out into the fields to look for more cows. The problem is that cows are difficult to find, and new cows don’t often yield the expected beef.

I’m hoping they are going to concentrate and invest their efforts into developing existing ideas, even if at the same time they’re pulling out all stops to get the CEO a satisfactory response.

Should you find yourself in this unenviable-yet-crucial position within your own organization, I encourage you to consider the questions above. They may just mean the difference between progress and business as usual! – Mike Brown

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Download: FREE Innovation Strategic Thinking Fake Book

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookAre you making the best use of customer input and market insights to deliver innovation and growth? Creating successful, innovative new products and services has never been more dependent on tapping perspectives from outside your organization.

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Download this FREE ebook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s growth.

Download Your Free Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Fake Book

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Do you dread strategy meetings?

Really, we’re among friends, so you can be completely truthful in your answer: Do you REALLY, REALLY DREAD strategy meetings?

Of course, you dread them. Every executive dreads strategic planning. I know I do.

The reason is while it is important for organizations, participants hardly ever see the connection between participation and positive changes for brands and customers.

While a strategic planning process may promise to deliver real objectives and tactics, it often never happens as promised. Senior executives may say they want disruptive ideas, but they really want ideas that are easy to grasp and fit the current system. And who wants to waste precious time on trying to imagine and plan things an organization should pursue but ultimately never will?

That is why wrapping strategy meetings in creative thinking exercises and the appropriate amount of fun and diversion is optimum.

80 Fun Strategic Planning Activities and Ideas!

We’ve been facilitating fun strategic planning activities for years.

Across our client engagements, here are links to 80 activities and ideas for making strategy more fun!

Even though fun strategy meetings seem elusive, we routinely make them productive, enjoyable, and fun for the organizations, senior executives, and teams with which we work. Enjoy this dive into our most successful approaches.

If you would like to go even deeper, contact us, and let’s talk about how we can bring a fun approach to strategy into your organization! – Mike Brown

 

fun-ideas-strategic-planning11 Ideas to Make a Strategic Planning Process More Fun!

Yes, strategic planning can be fun . . . if you know the right ways to liven it up while still developing solid strategies! If you’re intrigued by the possibilities, download our FREE eBook, “11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning.”

Download Your FREE eBook! 11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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In the Midwest, where I grew up, grain elevators are a common sight. The tall structures store grain for processing, and you learn as a kid that they can be both combustible and explosive. Given they hold a high concentration of grain, and therefore a large surface area, it only takes a small spark to turn one into an explosive scene.

3 Conditions for Explosive Creative Thinking Skills

Reflecting on grain elevators led me to consider explosive creative thinking skills, and the parallels between the two. The characteristics that create a potentially dangerous explosive situation at a grain elevator can be turned to a positive when applied to creative thinking skills:

#1. Large surface area

When it comes to creativity, this element translates to setting up many-to-many (as opposed to one-on-one) interactions among participants during a creative workshop. In this way, a variety of people are exposed to, and can stimulate new thoughts and perspectives in, one another.

#2. Intensity

Achieve intensity by constraining time and creating high expectations for the number of ideas a creative group should imagine. With just a few competitive people involved across a large group of participants, a big goal combined with a deadline leads to an opportunity to push everyone’s creative thinking skills for big impact.

#3. Structure

Finally, by having creative thinking exercises in place, you provide the right structure for group collaboration. And that’s the spark that takes the setting from calm to explosive.

Creativity Goes Boom!

This shorthand analogy proves very convenient if your team’s creative thinking skills aren’t delivering the results you would like to accomplish. Step back and ask, How can we generate the combination of the abundant surface area, intensity, and the structure to spark an explosion of creative thinking? – Mike Brown

Facing Innovation Barriers? We Can Help!

Innovation-Strategy-eBooks

Are you facing organizational innovation barriers related to:

We have free Brainzooming eBooks for you to help navigate barriers and boost innovation!

 

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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“I’ve known those guys for years, and they smiled all the way through a strategic planning process. That’s when I knew I wanted to meet you guys.”

That’s what the CEO of a nearly-$1 billion, employee-owned company said to us at our first meeting. We facilitate the strategic planning process for his organization’s largest business unit in 2016. Currently, we’re helping develop and implement one of its strategic initiatives.

The CEO wanted to discuss how we can help him with the strategic planning process across the corporation. The idea is that we’ll work with him to develop a strategic direction and then create a corporate strategic plan with his direct reports. Following that, we’ll work with each business unit on its own collaborative strategic plan.

Now, this is still a work in progress. In fact, we’re in the process of putting together the scope of work. But I wanted to share this endorsement while it was still fresh. We don’t share many of the accolades we receive, because our focus is on you and information that helps you, not news about us.

Keeping It All Smiles

I am sharing this one because it’s the kind of endorsement I particularly enjoy.

We strive to make any strategic planning process engaging, fun, and completely smile-worthy. In other words, everything strategic planning usually is not! Receiving this validation from the corporation’s CEO meant the world to me because getting people to smile during something that most people hate is a big part of why we do what we do.

Want to see this happen in your organization? If you’re ready to create your best strategic plan yet, in a shorter time than you’re used to, in a way that’s fun, engaging, and makes people smile, get in touch today. We have all kinds of ideas and proven methods to make it happen for you! – Mike Brown

 

fun-ideas-strategic-planning11 Ideas to Make a Strategic Planning Process More Fun!

Yes, strategic planning can be fun . . . if you know the right ways to liven it up while still developing solid strategies! If you’re intrigued by the possibilities, download our FREE eBook, “11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning.”

Download Your FREE eBook! 11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning

Enjoy this article? Subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We turn to extreme creativity questions to help clients imagine big ideas. It is all part of not ASKING for big ideas; we use big questions that enhance peoples’ natural creative thinking skills. They start filling the extra space big questions create with ideas of ALL sizes. Based on our experience using extreme creativity questions, they DO tend to yield bigger ideas.

5 Quick Tips on Extreme Creativity and Creative Thinking Skills

What other tips have we learned about how extreme creativity questions boost creative thinking skills? Here are five of them:

1. Plan the series of extreme creativity questions you are going to use.

Try to use different types of questions so you aren’t only looking at your opportunity from one perspective. That means not every question should be about doing ridiculous amounts of something or doing completely without something. Mix it up!

2. Don’t think an awkward experience isn’t working.

It is okay if feels uncomfortable and it doesn’t seem as if an extreme creativity question makes sense for your organization. That means it is stretching your thinking. Don’t move away to a different question that seems a better fit until you’ve made a healthy effort to exploit a more difficult one.

3. Try introducing extreme creativity roles for participants.

Imagine an outlandish creativity-oriented title that perfectly fits each participant’s creative thinking skills. Do a few exercises without disclosing the roles, then hand each person his or her extreme creativity role. You can have them reveal the roles OR keep them secret. They assume the extreme creativity roles (Master of Mashups, for instance) for an exercise. Afterward, have each person pass their role to someone who the extreme creativity role will stretch during the next exercise.

4. What seems like funny business can be incredible business.

Look for laughter as a strong cue that a group working with extreme creativity questions is onto something. Laughter is a natural response when an idea is outrageous. It is more likely to signal an idea has promise than it doesn’t.

5. There are multiple ways to work with outlandish ideas.

If you are coming up with ideas that seem to have promise, but seem as if they won’t work, don’t just leave them in that state. Have a way to extract usable versions of the ideas, even if you continue pursuing the impossible side of them.

Boosting Your Team’s Creative Thinking Skills

If you are looking to boost the impact and innovative nature of ideas in your organization, we recommend employing extreme creativity questions.

Alternatively, you can employ The Brainzooming Group, and we’ll develop the exercises and facilitate all the extreme creativity thinking for you! Contact us, and let’s get started, why don’t you? – Mike Brown

Facing Innovation Barriers? We Can Help!

Innovation-Strategy-eBooks

Are you facing organizational innovation barriers related to:

We have free Brainzooming eBooks for you to help navigate barriers and boost innovation!

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I snapped this picture at Target the other evening because of the intriguing product branding ideas it suggests.

This is a ten-pack of 7.5 ounce cans of Diet Coke. Compare that to the typical Diet Coke configuration: twelve cans of 12 ounces. Doing the math, this carton has 75 ounces of Diet Coke vs. 144 ounces in the typical 12-by-12 arrangement we purchase like crazy at our house.

Just looking at the numbers, you can see people are receiving about 50% of the amount of Diet Coke they might expect if they rush into the store and grab a carton without paying attention.

That’s a big difference!

3 Product Branding Ideas to Beg, Borrow, and Steal

Suppose you are in a similar product branding situation. You need to reduce what your brand delivers, but still put sizzle into your product so consumers think it is an attractive option. How do you go about it? Try going to school on three producing branding ideas from Diet Coke, and look for where you can beg, borrow, and steal ideas!

Beg

Background: Smaller cans do not usually suggest a positive brand experience.

Diet Coke Strategy: Translating small to sip-sized. This takes advantage of alliteration and whimsy. And rather than seeking permission for the change, this branding strategy idea begs forgiveness later – if ever!

Ask: What’s the coolest way possible to describe the presto-chango we’re about to pull on our customers?

Borrow

Background: Mini Cooper has positive brand affinity. The brand has helped make small a good thing.

Diet Coke Strategy: Borrowing mini and using it in a maxi fashion across the entire side of the box.

Ask: What brand positively employs a typically negative attribute that our branding strategy can embrace and celebrate?

Steal

Background: On the carton, it says 7.5 ounce cans. The images show the traditional can and bottle, though.

Diet Coke Strategy: Stealing from the Coca-Cola brand halo to depict a traditional can (12 ounces) and the classic bottle (something bigger than 7.5 ounces). This creates a deliberate mismatch between what you see and what you buy.

Ask: What brand attributes from our higher value / more significant offers can we use to sell-in something less?

Download 10 Questions for Successfully Launching

From the Brainzooming Product Branding Lab

We haven’t tested this exercise for generating product branding ideas since it is brand new. If you beat us to putting it into practice, let us know how it works for you! – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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If your creativity ideas have dried up, today is the day to download our FREE ebook, The 600 Most Powerful Strategic Planning Questions.

There are links in this eBook for 600 of the most powerful brainstorming and extreme creativity questions we use, including ones specifically tailored for innovation and creative boldness!

Your creative creek will be flowing with extreme creativity ideas, just like a summer downpour!

Download this eBook to Boost Extreme Creativity Ideas

Just click here or click the picture above to get started!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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