Creativity | The Brainzooming Group - Part 3 – page 3
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“I’ve known those guys for years, and they smiled all the way through a strategic planning process. That’s when I knew I wanted to meet you guys.”

That’s what the CEO of a nearly-$1 billion, employee-owned company said to us at our first meeting. We facilitate the strategic planning process for his organization’s largest business unit in 2016. Currently, we’re helping develop and implement one of its strategic initiatives.

The CEO wanted to discuss how we can help him with the strategic planning process across the corporation. The idea is that we’ll work with him to develop a strategic direction and then create a corporate strategic plan with his direct reports. Following that, we’ll work with each business unit on its own collaborative strategic plan.

Now, this is still a work in progress. In fact, we’re in the process of putting together the scope of work. But I wanted to share this endorsement while it was still fresh. We don’t share many of the accolades we receive, because our focus is on you and information that helps you, not news about us.

Keeping It All Smiles

I am sharing this one because it’s the kind of endorsement I particularly enjoy.

We strive to make any strategic planning process engaging, fun, and completely smile-worthy. In other words, everything strategic planning usually is not! Receiving this validation from the corporation’s CEO meant the world to me because getting people to smile during something that most people hate is a big part of why we do what we do.

Want to see this happen in your organization? If you’re ready to create your best strategic plan yet, in a shorter time than you’re used to, in a way that’s fun, engaging, and makes people smile, get in touch today. We have all kinds of ideas and proven methods to make it happen for you! – Mike Brown

 

fun-ideas-strategic-planning11 Ideas to Make a Strategic Planning Process More Fun!

Yes, strategic planning can be fun . . . if you know the right ways to liven it up while still developing solid strategies! If you’re intrigued by the possibilities, download our FREE eBook, “11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning.”

Download Your FREE eBook! 11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We turn to extreme creativity questions to help clients imagine big ideas. It is all part of not ASKING for big ideas; we use big questions that enhance peoples’ natural creative thinking skills. They start filling the extra space big questions create with ideas of ALL sizes. Based on our experience using extreme creativity questions, they DO tend to yield bigger ideas.

5 Quick Tips on Extreme Creativity and Creative Thinking Skills

What other tips have we learned about how extreme creativity questions boost creative thinking skills? Here are five of them:

1. Plan the series of extreme creativity questions you are going to use.

Try to use different types of questions so you aren’t only looking at your opportunity from one perspective. That means not every question should be about doing ridiculous amounts of something or doing completely without something. Mix it up!

2. Don’t think an awkward experience isn’t working.

It is okay if feels uncomfortable and it doesn’t seem as if an extreme creativity question makes sense for your organization. That means it is stretching your thinking. Don’t move away to a different question that seems a better fit until you’ve made a healthy effort to exploit a more difficult one.

3. Try introducing extreme creativity roles for participants.

Imagine an outlandish creativity-oriented title that perfectly fits each participant’s creative thinking skills. Do a few exercises without disclosing the roles, then hand each person his or her extreme creativity role. You can have them reveal the roles OR keep them secret. They assume the extreme creativity roles (Master of Mashups, for instance) for an exercise. Afterward, have each person pass their role to someone who the extreme creativity role will stretch during the next exercise.

4. What seems like funny business can be incredible business.

Look for laughter as a strong cue that a group working with extreme creativity questions is onto something. Laughter is a natural response when an idea is outrageous. It is more likely to signal an idea has promise than it doesn’t.

5. There are multiple ways to work with outlandish ideas.

If you are coming up with ideas that seem to have promise, but seem as if they won’t work, don’t just leave them in that state. Have a way to extract usable versions of the ideas, even if you continue pursuing the impossible side of them.

Boosting Your Team’s Creative Thinking Skills

If you are looking to boost the impact and innovative nature of ideas in your organization, we recommend employing extreme creativity questions.

Alternatively, you can employ The Brainzooming Group, and we’ll develop the exercises and facilitate all the extreme creativity thinking for you! Contact us, and let’s get started, why don’t you? – Mike Brown

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We have free Brainzooming eBooks for you to help navigate barriers and boost innovation!

 

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I snapped this picture at Target the other evening because of the intriguing product branding ideas it suggests.

This is a ten-pack of 7.5 ounce cans of Diet Coke. Compare that to the typical Diet Coke configuration: twelve cans of 12 ounces. Doing the math, this carton has 75 ounces of Diet Coke vs. 144 ounces in the typical 12-by-12 arrangement we purchase like crazy at our house.

Just looking at the numbers, you can see people are receiving about 50% of the amount of Diet Coke they might expect if they rush into the store and grab a carton without paying attention.

That’s a big difference!

3 Product Branding Ideas to Beg, Borrow, and Steal

Suppose you are in a similar product branding situation. You need to reduce what your brand delivers, but still put sizzle into your product so consumers think it is an attractive option. How do you go about it? Try going to school on three producing branding ideas from Diet Coke, and look for where you can beg, borrow, and steal ideas!

Beg

Background: Smaller cans do not usually suggest a positive brand experience.

Diet Coke Strategy: Translating small to sip-sized. This takes advantage of alliteration and whimsy. And rather than seeking permission for the change, this branding strategy idea begs forgiveness later – if ever!

Ask: What’s the coolest way possible to describe the presto-chango we’re about to pull on our customers?

Borrow

Background: Mini Cooper has positive brand affinity. The brand has helped make small a good thing.

Diet Coke Strategy: Borrowing mini and using it in a maxi fashion across the entire side of the box.

Ask: What brand positively employs a typically negative attribute that our branding strategy can embrace and celebrate?

Steal

Background: On the carton, it says 7.5 ounce cans. The images show the traditional can and bottle, though.

Diet Coke Strategy: Stealing from the Coca-Cola brand halo to depict a traditional can (12 ounces) and the classic bottle (something bigger than 7.5 ounces). This creates a deliberate mismatch between what you see and what you buy.

Ask: What brand attributes from our higher value / more significant offers can we use to sell-in something less?

Download 10 Questions for Successfully Launching

From the Brainzooming Product Branding Lab

We haven’t tested this exercise for generating product branding ideas since it is brand new. If you beat us to putting it into practice, let us know how it works for you! – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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If your creativity ideas have dried up, today is the day to download our FREE ebook, The 600 Most Powerful Strategic Planning Questions.

There are links in this eBook for 600 of the most powerful brainstorming and extreme creativity questions we use, including ones specifically tailored for innovation and creative boldness!

Your creative creek will be flowing with extreme creativity ideas, just like a summer downpour!

Download this eBook to Boost Extreme Creativity Ideas

Just click here or click the picture above to get started!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I was thinking about tables recently, and the role they play in creating or thwarting team collaboration.

A table can…

Provide distance and separation between participants

That can be both healthy or disastrous. It’s easy to use distance and opposition (as in sitting on directly opposite sides of the table) to foster disagreement, aggression, and otherness. In different situations, distance around a table can offer space for individual reflection or a couple of people to collaborate without being drawn into something bigger.

Idea: Arrange people purposefully and keep moving them around.

Serve as a hiding place

If it is your intention, you can use a table’s shapes and angles and how people fill them up to keep yourself out of view and out of the team conversation. You may use the hiding place to observe, look away, or plan what you do when you emerge from hiding.

Idea: A facilitator needs to draw people out of hiding places.

Create clutter

A too big table or too many tables in a too small room, can fill all the available space people need to move around both physically and mentally. They can eliminate any flexibility a space might offer.

Idea: Pay attention to how many table you are using and not using. Get rooms with way more square footage than you think you will need.

Establish power

Sitting at the front, sitting at the back, or sitting at a corner can, depending on who is doing the sitting, change the power dynamics for the entire group.

Idea: Use tables without corners and avoid creating a clear front of the room.

Be purely functional

It provides a place to put your arms, bang your head (or your fist), take notes, hold your drink, plug in your computer. You hope it affords an arrangement that lets you see what you need to see and is a jumping off point for people to productively collaborate.

Idea: Match the right table to what you will need it for throughout the meeting.

Team Collaboration with No Table at All

This thinking inspired something we’ll be doing soon: eliminate the tables and use only a few chairs. Provide the right amount of space to make it both inviting and slightly awkward.

We look forward to seeing what using no tables at all will do for creating or thwarting team collaboration. – Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Beyond depicting your product every which way (or depicting the equipment and people who create your service every which way), what images do you include in your brand’s visual vocabulary?

As you consider that answer, ask yourself this: Are you effectively using the best images to reinforce your brand in strategic, consistent ways?

Let’s talk about your brand’s visual vocabulary. I’ve spent a heck of a lot of time considering on design as we solidify the Brainzooming brand’s visual vocabulary through creating more eBooks on strategy and innovation (with our initial offer on branding on the way).

11 Hacks for Creating Your Brand’s Visual Vocabulary

Here are the hacks that have worked for us.

Start by unpacking your brand for inspiration. Look at all the pieces of your brand foundation (big strategy statements, brand promise) to discover the most significant words and phrases you use to describe your brand. You can do this by:

  • Combing through brand foundation materials and existing creative briefs. This will help you avoid spending time trying to recreate visual vocabulary clues that already exist.
  • Running a Wordle on web pages or other content where your brand talks about itself. This is one way to check for important descriptors.
  • Putting customer comments and open-ended descriptions about your brand through a Wordle to see what emerges on top from the marketplace’s view.
  • Reviewing your current brand visuals to identify themes or types of images that stand out based on repetition or impact.
  • Cataloging brand visuals from direct competitors and other brands that do comparable things to what your brand does. Examine what are doing to uncover opportunities to differentiate your brand visually.

Explore ideas to associate visuals with your important brand words and phrases. Start by:

  • Plugging brand words and themes into Google Images. This will help you uncover images the world associates with your brand words.
  • Searching brand words and phrases in professional photo sites to see what stock photos images exist. Careful on this: you will see lots of visual clichés you don’t want to associate with your brand.
  • Extending your search to visually oriented and image-based social sites (Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr). Look for how a broad range of people capture and categorize images linked to your brand’s attributes.

Document what you learn through:

  • Writing ideas describing the images you found. This is the approach I employed. Some of the related words were literal; others were more abstract.
  • Creating Pinterest mood boards. This is a smart alternative suggested by a design blog.:   http://designyourownblog.com/visual-vocabulary-brand-identity/They recommend pinning images you find on separate Pinterest mood boards to identify themes, then consolidating them into one overall brand mood board.
  • Finding what works for you to capture and share your results with others. I used words because my next step was taking photos to build our brand image library. Working with words makes it easier for me to avoid duplicating what others are doing. Looking at visuals as my starting points would make it too easy to potentially co-opt other people’s’ visualizations accidentally.

This is a simple approach for building your brand vocabulary, but I know it worked for us.

If you haven’t invested much time thinking about your brand and its visual vocabulary, starting simple can move you ahead dramatically! – Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’ll admit it upfront: I’m not a huge fan of highly-involved, fun strategic planning icebreaker activities that don’t provide direct value to the strategic thinking we need to do.

Granted, the contribution doesn’t have to be something that will go into the final strategic plan.

But if we’re going to invest any amount of time for fun strategic planning icebreaker activities, they need to directly contribute to a fun environment or help the group to network and collaborate more effectively during the day.

So, with the idea of sharing ideas that still leave you with lots of flexibility, here are strategic planning icebreaker activities you can develop to best suit your strategy group’s needs. You can use these idea starters and imagine what will be most effective in any setting.

8 Strategic Planning Ice Breaker Activities

  • Ask a question that even people that have worked together for a very long time would have never asked and discussed previously.
  • Have people quickly pair up (or multiple up) and create something they will need during later strategy activities.
  • Give everyone an individual question that fits them perfectly. Have them ask the question of everyone. During introductions, the group introduces each individual as they share all their answers about a specific person.
  • Ask a most, least, best, or worst question that everyone answers.
  • Ask a first question: What was your first friend? First love? First job? First thing you did this morning? The first thing you do in a new city?
  • Ask a last question: Last thing on your mind? Last time you felt like a kid? Last time you were shocked? Last time you did something that scared you?
  • Ask a never question: What are you never doing? Have never done but would like to? Never thought (when you were young) that you would (or wouldn’t) be doing this all the time? Something you never thought you’d admit this to a group of co-workers but here it is?
  • Create a laundry list of odd (but not necessarily embarrassing) activities. Have people select one to do when it is their turn to introduce themselves.

Do you see a starting point in these ideas? If so, let us know what you try and how it works. If not, try here, here, or here for even more fun strategic planning icebreaker activities you could try. – Mike Brown

 

fun-ideas-strategic-planning11 Ideas to Make a Strategic Planning Process More Fun!

Yes, strategic planning can be fun . . . if you know the right ways to liven it up while still developing solid strategies! If you’re intrigued by the possibilities, download our FREE eBook, “11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning.”

Download Your FREE eBook! 11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning

Enjoy this article? Subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

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