Creativity | The Brainzooming Group - Part 65 – page 65
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What a first day at The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference (#BigIdeas12)!

I flew in from Kansas City Thursday morning and arrived at Rutgers University just as the first presentation was about to begin.  And in keeping with what happens at church if you arrive late, I was placed in the front row, first seat – about 6 feet from the interviewing area. For someone who usually hangs back, it put me right in the heart of great presentations on social networking, disruption (particular of higher education), innovation, and incredible stories of the triumph of the human spirit.

Suffice it to say there will likely be multiple recap posts from The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference on the Brainzooming blog.

I’m doing an innovation workshop today called “Making Big Ideas Happen.” My charge is to integrate all fifteen #BigIdeas12 presentations from today and make strategic connections to help attendees of The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference to apply the lessons from an eclectic group of TED-like presentations into their work and personal lives. While I tried to make some guesses upfront about what presenters would talk about relative to innovation and strategic connections, there were definitely late night adjustments to the “Making Big Ideas Happen” session to ensure it reflected all the incredible content from the opening session.

To support “Making Big Ideas Happen,” here are links to a variety to articles supporting topics we’ll be talking about in today’s workshop. And once again, while this is targeted for workshop attendees, the concepts are of benefit to a much broader audience:

Capturing Big Ideas and Strategic Connections: Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference – This setup post for The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference lends itself to looking for strategic connections in any situation where you’re processing content

Did You Know Video: Although a few years old at this point, this video gets your attention with a compelling presentation of the demographic and technological realities of modern education.

6 Strategic Success Skills for Today’s WorkplaceRecaps some of the educational and attitudinal changes needed to prepare students with the success skills needed to enter today’s workplace.

Brainzooming – First Questions – A short and sweet article on the fundamental strategic question to ask.

Strategic Connections – 3 Tips for Identifying More OpportunitiesThese 3 steps provide a strong way to look for many more and richer strategic connections.

Extending Brainstorming Ground Rules to Everyday Business Life – There are typical approaches to brainstorming that can benefit coming up with ideas in brainstorming sessions. If you work at it, you can extend this approach to every day work life too.

Look Inside for Distinctive Talents – 5 questions to identify your distinctive talents as a first step to taking better advantage of them to shape your creative pursuits.

Why strategic thinking doesn’t happen, part 3 – Somebody’s missing – A brief case for the value of incorporating individuals with different thinking and implementation styles to get more innovative thinking.

Crowdsourcing Diverse Input – 3 Ways to Make Crowdsourcing Work Harder – Crowdsourcing for input is great, but if you want it to be fruitful for the crowd and the requesting organization, providing appropriate structure is important.

6 Ways Social Networking Platforms Can Boost Creative Thinking –  Social networking platforms can be an outstanding source to boost creative thinking – if you use them well.

Benjamin Zander and the Art of Possibilities – A small snippet of the wonderful Benjamin Zander presentation where he lets us in on the Art of Possibilities with the vital admonition: It’s all invented!

A Poor Question for Valentine’s Day: “Can You Change Your Look?” – If you’re always looking at the same situation from the same place, you’ll see the same things. Change how you look at the status quo and find incredible new ideas.

15 Ways Whoever Is Going to Disrupt Your Market Isn’t Like You– Trust me, higher education played the part of a big fire hydrant during day one, and there was a lot of peeing going on around it. The forces that disrupt higher education aren’t going to have pretty quads and columned buildings!

11 Strategic Questions for Disruptive Innovation in Markets – If higher education professionals (or any of us) are up for truly disruptive innovation, here are 1 strategic questions you can use to start identifying opportunities.

We’ve Seen the Enemy & They Don’t Look Anything Like Us – More questions to begin understanding who might be the surprising disruptive forces in a market. One critical element is to generalize and understand what is like your current situation.

Change Your Character – One of the easiest ways to come up with new ideas is to delegate your innovation challenge to someone else. Here’s a creative thinking exercise that does just that.

Creating Memorable Experiences – There are three keys to creating memorable experiences for any event – whether it’s a special event or an event that happens every day.

Creating Intriguing Social Media Content – 3 Fundamental Steps – There are also three keys to identifying and creating intriguing social media content. Get these right, and you’ll have much stronger content.

Social Media Content Ideation: Think – Know – Do – Sure you get to talk about topics of interest to your business. But you only get to talk about them after you’ve thought about what your audience really wants to hear about in their lives. Then you can fit what you think, know, and do to into their expectations.

Five Innovation Lessons from Improv Comedy – by Woody Bendle – A whole lot of improvisation is based on fantastic planning and anticipation. It’s ironic, but it’s the truth.

Creating Change and Change Management – 4 Strategy Options – Some change can be incremental, but often an incremental approach to change won’t do. In those cases, here are three other strategy options to consider for creating change.

Being Perceived as an Innovative Leader – Not all innovative leaders are doing outrageous things (sorry if you think otherwise, but it’s true). Many times, being an innovative leader means innovating processes to allow innovation to happen.

Share the Credit! – Give more credit for successes to others, and don’t take much (or any at all) for yourself.

Strategic Thinking – Do Your Own and Let Us Know What You Think – You don’t have to simply spit out what you hear form business experts. Consider what they have to say, then do your own strategic thinking and share it.

Outsmarting Fears about Your “Inferior” Expertise – Nobody is better at telling your own story than you. So start telling it in multiple channels! – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’m embarrassed to say I don’t remember the specific of the first time I tweeted with Trilby Jeeves, but it was quite some time ago. I’m sure though, my first encounter with Trilby Jeeves on Twitter had to involve creativity, acting, and her workshops to help people better understand and use their creativity. Somewhere along the line, probably in a later night conversation, I asked her to do a guest blog post. Trilby claims it was 3 years ago! I’m not sure it was that long ago, but suffice it to say I was excited recently when we got the first Trilby Jeeves guest Brainzooming post “in the house.” 

Trilby is an actor, instructor, and writer from Vancouver, Canada. Nine years ago, a back operation inspired her to change her working life and she began “Buffoonery Workshops.”  Trilby is a strong advocate for creativity (as you’ll soon learn from today’s post), and her passion is to help people play in order to lead a more balanced life. Here’s Trilby Jeeves!

Creativity and the Arts are Frivolous.

If you believe that, then you better not run into me or a few of my friends in a dark alley or even a coffee shop.

But.

Let’s say you did meet me in a coffee shop and we start talking about the recent arts education cuts. (I just heard about a whole performing arts program being sliced away, with 15 minutes notice given to the department at Keyano College in Fort McMurray, Canada).

You say, “Well, it’s about money, and the arts are frivolous, really.”

At that moment, you will see my face redden, my posture improve immensely, and you’ll sense a strange sort of energy hitting you, paralyzing you in your chair. You will not be able to shift, even if you command your legs to run.

Nope. I will have cast a “You just sit there and listen to me while I re-program, appropriately, your ignorant thinking” spell.

Are you listening closely? Maybe you should take a sip of coffee from that really cool mug someone designed.

Arts, creativity, right brain thinking, drawing, painting, performing, entertainment, storytelling, designing, poetry, dancing, song writing, singing, music and more are all words that conjure different images and feelings for each person in this world. For me, it means air to breathe.

I wonder to myself what they mean for you.

You shrug your shoulders, indicating a nonchalant commitment. “Yeah, those are all nice things, but do they make money?”

I ponder your question and realize I need to address creativity and the arts in a pragmatic way for you to actually get it. I have to let go of the emotional side of the arts for a moment (which, by the way, serves many, many purposes).

“Money, hey?”

“Well, (I refrain from calling you “dear” and releasing my inner sarcastic tone)… well, actually, if you were to do some deep examination and number crunching, you’d probably realize the arts actually bring quite a bit of good economic impact to a country.”

“Take Europe, for instance, I believe that most people voyage there because of the museums, galleries, historical architecture, food (culinary arts), and the richness of the atmosphere of cafes, theatres, and music.”

“Sure”

“Would you agree that brings quite a bit of money to an area?”

You reluctantly agree. I can tell it’s reluctant. But, I can’t stop there. I bring the debate closer to home.

I ask you about where we are currently. This café. I ask you to look around, and take in the atmosphere, how the tables are placed, the types of chairs we are sitting on, the music in the background, the lighting, the splashes of color on the mug you’re holding, and I ask if you think these elements just occurred by magic, or if some thought went into them? It is rhetorical, really, isn’t it?

Of course, someone DESIGNED everything we are experiencing. And, it translates to a monetary value. If the café had no atmosphere, do you really think they would be doing such a roaring business? I don’t think so.

But, what I have explained is very basic. Very. However, it does bring the question of art and creativity to a pretty fundamental place. Maybe that’s where we’ll get the attention of people.

If I were to bring the idea of the Performing Arts (of which I’m part of) to the discussion, I would think you might feel like you have more fodder for dismissing it as an extracurricular activity (as did Keyano College in Fort McMurray).

My guess was correct.

But, if we look at story telling as a basic human need (start with cave drawings and continue to money making filmmaking), you’ll soon realize that keeping stories secret, and not sharing, can be detrimental to your health.  (Result: a community’s health costs rise – not very economical).

I avoid the obvious (to me) benefits of seeing live performances, and coming out of a theatre with life changing ideas.

Need I suggest that when the young embrace performing arts as an option in high school or beyond, how much their confidence is built? We can turn that into a monetary response (since you seem to base everything on that) in that they will do much better in their adult life with this confidence. They might turn into entrepreneurs where creative thinking is crucial (trust me.. I am one of those people who has created her own job via the right brain road). And, they might do so well that they actually create jobs.

I see you are starting to sweat a little. I know that’s a sign you are realizing the absurdity and ignorance of your earlier thoughts, and, that perhaps you need to change your attitude.

I stop ranting. I realize I should let you re-think your ideas regarding creativity with these simple observations. My hopes are that you will look at the world through an alternate lens and realize that “artists” show up in all sorts of subtle ways.

And, if you decide that truck driving for the oil sands is more important, just remember that someone had to design that vehicle and think outside the box in order to make it a little more comfortable and safe. And, they might have even included a DVD player where you can watch those billion dollar Hollywood movies on your break.

I release my spell, watch as you nod, and thank me, shakily, and depart the busy café.  I call out after you, “If you come back tomorrow, I’ll talk about how great the arts and creativity is on a spiritual level!” You nod again.

Eventually, another person strolls over and, asks, “Is anyone sitting here?”

I smile and say, “No, please sit down.”

I breathe in.

“May I ask you a question?”

Need More Ammunition to Challenge “Creativity and the Arts Are Frivolous”?

Just in case you need a little more convincing or some ammunition for your own “Take the Frivolous out of Arts” movement, here are links to check for more information.

Books:

Online:

Vive les arts ET la créativité! Trilby Jeeves

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The Brainzooming blog has a wonderful group of guest authors who regularly contribute their perspectives on strategy, creativity, and innovation. You can view guest author posts by clicking on the link below.

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17

Responsible for creating cool product names for a new product idea?

A Brainzooming blog email subscriber asked me last week if The Brainzooming Group had a ready-made creative thinking exercise on the blog for creating cool product names for a new product idea.

I shared with her some variations on eight creative thinking questions in a previous post about developing creative job titles. If one reader has a question about a particular creative thinking exercise, it is probably a good sign other readers could use help on a similar question.

New Product Idea and Faux Names

The creative thinking questions you can use if you need to create ideas for new product names are below, but first, a couple of cautions:

Creating Cool Product Names with Creative Thinking Questions

Cool Product Names – 17 Creative Questions for Winning Product Name IdeasThis list is not designed to yield faux new product names comprised of nonsense syllables. The list of questions is intended to come up with intriguing, real-sounding names. Ask the eight creative thinking questions, come up with as many potential answers as you can, and then prioritize the most strategic and creative possibilities for consideration:

  • What words describe the cool outcomes from the new product or the experience of using it?
  • What other products are like this? What words are used to describe those products that we could modify and enhance?
  • If this new product delivered super powers, what would they be?
  • What words would you use to describe this new product if you were trying to impress your mom / dad or a spouse / girlfriend / boyfriend?
  • What words would add emotional impact to the product name?
  • What words describe HOW the product works when it is at its best?
  • What words would be more exciting, powerful, fun, surprising, or memorable?

You can click on the image below to get a free creative naming mini-poster that includes these questions in a fun, easy-to-use format!

Mini-Poster-Small

Which types of cool product names do you like?

What is your preference for new product names? Faux names or real names, and why? – Mike Brown

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Find New Resources to Innovate!

NEW FREE Download: 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

I love Big Ideas.

That’s why I’m so excited about attending and speaking next week at The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference at Rutgers University.

And in a clear departure from other higher education conference programs, even though The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference (#BigIdeas12) is for educators, the TED-oriented and Inside the Actor’s Studio-style sessions will largely be delivered by non-educators. And having gone through the speaker bios in-depth to prepare my own session, there’s an incredible group of amazingly talented and accomplished people presenting at the two-day conference.

But Where Are the Educators at this Higher Education Conference?

Since there’s an expectation some attendees are going to struggle with the absence of a full slate of higher education presenters, my last-afternoon session is to help attendees in capturing big ideas and making strategic connections among the various sessions so they can start making things happen with The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference content.

As I said to The Big Ideas in Higher Education Conference organizers, it would be better to do my session near the start of the conference rather than at the end. Alas, it was too late to change things around.

Instead, here are some thoughts for attendees at any conference where there are going to be speakers who may seem to have little direct connection to what you do. Even if that’s the case, there are always going to be opportunities to learn, especially from someone who knows nothing about what you know.

Capturing All Your Big Ideas and Making them Happen

Here are 3 key steps for capturing big ideas at a conference where the presenters or material are outside your focus areas:

1. List what you want from the conference beforehand.

List a few opportunities, challenges, or issues you want to address from the information presented at the conference. This will help keep your most important objectives top-of-mind throughout the conference.

2. Don’t take notes. Capture ideas and thought starters – even challenging and apparently irrelevant ones.

It’s great to take notes at a conference. But in addition, capture and keep a separate list of ideas & comments from the presenters. These are the concepts that really get you thinking, even if you don’t know what to think about them. Maybe it’s an interesting statistic. It could very well be something that connects with you on emotional level (think: excited, stunned, energized, angered, stimulated, challenged, etc.), even if it’s apathy or boredom from wondering why the presenter is sharing information you don’t think connects with you.

Organize these ideas and thought starters relative to how much you relate to the information and how much the concepts intrigue you. The matrix below presents a way to organize your notes:

3. Start Making Strategic Connections

Some strategic connections between your list in number 1 and ideas / concepts shared at the conference will be naturals (“Lessons” should be directly applicable to your interests; ”Familiar” ideas may need a little creative sizzle).

Other strategic connections will be more challenging to identify, but those are often the most fruitful ones for innovation opportunities.

To help identify potential strategic connections look for the following relationships between your list and the conference ideas:

  • Similarities
  • Stark differences
  • Shared characteristics
  • Similar inputs and/or outputs among them
  • Sequential relationships between items on each list

After having identified these relationships, you should be able to more easily find “Big Ideas” within the “Ideas” quadrant. This will occur as you link your related to opportunities/challenges to ideas / concepts from the conference content.

Ideas in the “Huh?” category should provide relatively fertile ground for additional brainstorming to identify innovative connections you missed seeing the first time through.

What’s Next?

These first three steps will get you started in looking at ideas shared at an innovative business conference in new ways.

What’s next in terms of additional techniques for innovatively adapting ideas to your organizational situation is the topic of my presentation for The Big Ideas in Education Conference?

Coming out of my session (“Take all of your Big Ideas and Make them Happen, an Innovation Workshop”), I’ll share multiple strategic techniques exercises to derive even greater value from an innovative conference experience.

And if you want to follow along, track The Big Ideas Education Conference on Twitter at #BigIdeas12. – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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19

Some business conferences you attend are beneficial because of specific content presented. Other business conferences are beneficial because of all the creative ideas they trigger, irrespective of whether the ideas were actually discussed by presenters. The Innovation Summit presented by Kansas City Kansas Community College last week soundly delivered on triggering ideas for strategic questions for disruptive innovation in markets.

In fact, the free, half-day Kansas City Kansas Community College Innovation Summit was a veritable bonanza since I walked away with a variety of ideas triggered by the presenters. Those ideas included ones for several new Brainzooming creative thinking exercises I’d never before imagined.

To do a little sharing, the presentations from keynote speaker Dean Teng-Kee Tan (of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Bloch School of Business) and several Kansas City innovators suggested eleven strategic questions to ask relative to imagining potential market disruption opportunities:

11 Strategic Questions for Disruptive Innovation

1. What feature can you create that’s missing in someone else’s product?

2. Where can you disrupt significant cost areas in physical goods?

3. How can you digitize a physical element, action, or experience – or digitize all three?

4. What steps can you take to create a service out of your strongest / most prevalent support capability?

5. How can you inject a completely emotional experience into what you do?

6. Ever thought about ways to digitize a service?

7. How is it possible to smooth demand for inefficient / difficult to provide capabilities?

8. What would it take to turn in-person interactions into remote interactions?

9. How can you digitize scarce resources to put them in more places simultaneously?

10. What could you do to help push the biggest player in your desired market to leave the marketplace?

11. If the most prominent player in your market did go away, what opportunities would it open up?

Asking the Right Strategic Question

Again, none of the presenters necessarily mentioned these strategic questions for disruptive innovation. The questions were derived from the various case studies and examples presenters shared and by asking one of my favorite questions:

What strategic question (or questions) could cause someone to come up with the same answer the original innovator did?

And when you land on great strategic questions, you can much more easily generate lots of innovation ideas. – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Contact us at info@brainzooming.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

 

Find New Resources to Innovate!

NEW FREE Download: 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

The creative inspiration, in part, for Monday’s post about whether “Successful Innovation Can Only Happen in a Certain Way” was Saturday’s “Creating” article in the Wall Street Journal about Italy-based gallerist and creative visionary, Carla Sozzani. The article highlights how over the past 20-plus years she has created 10 Corso Como, a fashion and design-oriented art, retail, and publishing complex in Milan.

Carla Sozzani’s perspective, as portrayed in the Wall Street Journal article, is of a creative visionary driving a strong personal creative vision throughout 10 Corso Como with apparently little need for collaboration or outside creative input. While that’s not me, the confidence to make a strong personal creative vision work absent robust collaboration is both fascinating to me and a source to learn from and better apply in my own creative life. Here are 5 ideas I took away from the article:

1. Exclusively integrate your own creative sensibilities into everything

As mentioned in the intro, 10 Corso Como defies simple categorization. As much as anything, it sounds as if the connecting factor is Carla Sozzani herself, since she selects every item for sale. She extends her creative sensibilities into the experience as well, making clients sit during a purchase to bask in the luxury of time. It’s clear your common creative thread doesn’t have to be an idea or a theme. Your common creative thread can be YOU and your sensibilities!

2. Don’t ask for creative advice if you don’t want, need, or plan to use it

Sozzani eschews asking her audiences for feedback or input on direction. She states boldly that she has no interest in trying to please everyone since it’s impossible to do. Instead, she scans for popular products that have yet to turn trendy and features these at 10 Corso Como.

3. Secondary research has a legitimate place in creative expression

Secondary research implies looking for answers to questions others have already asked and answered. Sozzani extends this concept to “secondary creativity,” looking all over for creative inspiration on what to include in 10 Corso Como. Her creative inspiration appears to come from diverse exploration across creative media, geographies, and popularity, among other things. Sometimes it even extends to buying something simply to get the contact info for the producer to source a related item.

4. Understand how you can best be your own self-editor on creative decisions

How fast do you make decisions? And when you’re making a creative decision on your own, how do you validate them? Carla Sozzani says she makes decisions very quickly – in a matter of seconds – and if she hesitates on a creative decision, she takes it as a sign it’s not the right decision.

5. Regularly wipe your creativity clean

Every August while Italians head to the beach, Sonzatti shutters 10 Corso Como for 10 days. During this period, everything is removed for cleaning and painting. This 10 day hiatus also imposes an important creative refresh and reimagining of the space.

I’m Taking Note

My creative style and aspirations are markedly different than Carla Sonzatti’s, but I’m so excited to think about how I can incorporate what I learned from this article into my creative pursuits! – Mike Brown

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational innovation boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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12

I’m not sure if public sentiment has changed or if I’m simply more attuned to it right now. But ever since the publication of Jonah Lehrer’s book “Imagine: How Creativity Works,” there seems to be a rash of seemingly contrarian articles with titles suggesting creativity or innovation have to happen in a certain way to be successful.

Recent examples have included “If You’re Not Pissing Someone Off, You’re Probably Not Innovating” from the Harvard Business Review, “Sustainable Innovation Stems from Individuals, Not a Group” via Fast Company, and “Failure Is the Only Path to Innovation” on the Innovation Excellence blog.

Typically, when these articles appear, someone will ask me what I think about them.

My response?

I’m bored with all these authors claiming successful innovation HAS TO happen in the way they espouse.

C’mon. We’re talking about creativity and innovative thinking here people. These two wonderful things (or experiences or phenomena or processes or whatever you want to call them) are so glorious BECAUSE there are so many ways you can realize them:

Okay, I’m definitely not Dr. Seuss, but I hope you get my point. If you’re a creative genius, go ahead and be individually, singularly creative and never look back.

If you don’t consider yourself a creative genius, then surround yourself with other people, tools, and inspirations to help you be more creative. That’s the stuff I write about here, because I’ve used these techniques and have experience with them working successfully.

If someone wants to share another way innovative ideas originate, I’m all about hearing what they have to share.

But if they’re going to simply point out how successful innovation can only happen in a certain way (or how it won’t happen in some other way), well, then I’m just not that interested.

What do you think?

Does innovation only work one way for you and your organization? – Mike Brown

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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