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Today at the Social Media Strategy Summit, along with Kaite Stover, Director of Readers’ Services at the Kansas City Public Library, I’m presenting a fun case study. The presentation is about how the Kansas City Public Library was able to “sponsor bomb” the 2015 Major League Baseball Playoffs and World Series with a book spine poetry campaign.

In short, the Library used images of multiple stacked books chosen so that the combined titles communicated messages to tweak the baseball teams (and the libraries in their communities) with pro-Kansas City Royals messages.

Sponsor-bomb-book-spine-poe

BTW, did I mention the Kansas City Royals are the 2015 World Champions? Just checking . . . wanted to make sure you knew that!

While The Brainzooming Group wasn’t involved in developing the social media strategy behind the World Series sponsor bomb, we’ve been working with the Library on branding and event strategy. Knowing how smart the social media strategy for the World Series sponsor bomb campaign was, we brought the story and the tremendous impact from the initiative to the attention of Breanna Jacobs, the Social Media Strategy Summit producer.

Kaite will cover the Kansas City Public Library social media strategy and implementation from start to finish. I’ll share lessons for other brands in how they might envision comparable sponsor bomb opportunities for their own brands.

Social Media Strategy – 5 Keys to Sponsor Bomb a High-Profile Event

If you aren’t with us in Chicago, here are the smart things the Kansas City Public Library did to make the strategy as effective as it was:

Here’s hoping the Royals go all the way again in 2016 so we can see what the Kansas City Public Library does with the next chapter of its book spine poetry sponsor bomb strategy!  – Mike Brown

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When was the last time you invested 45 minutes to check your social media strategy?

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question. Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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This afternoon, I’m leading a three-hour Brainzooming workshop on creating branded content marketing at the Social Media Strategy Summit in Chicago. While it’s nice to be able to stretch with more time (typically these content marketing workshops are two hours at the Social Media Strategy Summit), I still feel as if there will be a lot of material that we won’t have time to fully cover.

Chicago-Image

In the branded content marketing workshop, we’ll look at generating appropriately branded content from multiple directions.

As a resource if this area is something you are struggling with in your organization, here are links to some of the topics on branded content marketing we’ll cover . . . and some that we won’t:

Taking an Audience-First Perspective

Staying True to Your Brand without Overdoing It

Experience and Interaction-Based Content for Your Brand

Expanding Brand-Related Content Options

Coming at your branded content marketing from these four different directions will open up all kinds of new possibilities.

Here’s the intriguing thing: having rearranged the content into these four groups (which don’t sync with the seven lessons in the workshop as it stands right now), I’m thinking (as I write this over the preceding weekend) that I’m going to rearrange the entire branded content marketing workshop. That’s how much I like this approach!  – Mike Brown

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When was the last time you invested 45 minutes
to check your social media strategy?

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question. Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I debuted a presentation on “Results – Creating Strategic Impact,” our mini-book on employee engagement ideas to boost an organization’s strategic thinking. The mini-book focuses on the tremendous value when an organization finds ways to strategically solicit employee insights and perspectives to shape its strategic thinking.

Results-Presentation

One attendee stuck around after the “Results” presentation to ask about a situation his son is facing. He runs a restaurant whose employees are generally high-turnover, lower wage young people. He said his son needs to improve the restaurant’s performance and wants to involve the employees. The question was whether it makes sense to try and engage employees in the ways I discussed when they aren’t likely to be around for very long.

The answer was easy: Yes!

5 Employee Engagement Ideas for High-Turnover Employees

To me, the length of someone’s employment doesn’t have a bearing on whether it makes strategic sense to engage them and their perspectives. We’ve talked before about how one company even uses entry interviews (as opposed to exit interviews) to gain input from new employees before they’ve consumed too much of the incredible corporate Kool-Aid.

Quickly Brainzooming with the restaurateur’s father, here are five employee engagement ideas to get valuable strategic thinking even when turnover is high:

  1. Involve employees as frontline listener-reporters, playing back what they hear from customers.
  2. Solicit their input on problems they are experiencing with internal processes.
  3. Ask them what workarounds they have figured out to make things go more smoothly than they would otherwise.
  4. Have them share suggestions for things they would experiment with, change, or definitely keep as is.
  5. Ask them where you can find more individuals like them to recruit for the business.

No matter how much they are getting paid or how long they’ll be around, those are five employee engagement ideas where even high-turnover employees can contribute strategic thinking to help make an organization’s leaders smarter about business issues.

And who knows . . . by involving them right from the start, you may actually reduce the turnover rate!  Mike Brown

10 Employee Engagement Ideas to Improve Strategic Results

FREE Download: “Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact”

Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-Book

Leaders need high-impact ways to develop employees that can provide input into strategic planning and then turn it into results. This Brainzooming mini-book, “Results – Creating Strategic Impact” unveils ten proven lessons leaders can use to boost collaboration, meaningful strategic conversations, and results.

Download this free, action-focused mini-book to:

  • Learn smart ways to separate strategic opportunities from the daily noise of business
  • Increase focus for your team with productive strategy questions everyone can use
  • Actively engage stakeholders in strategy AND implementation success

Download Your FREE Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-book

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We were working with a team responsible for a highly focused internal process that includes a customer-facing aspect. It’s a high volume, high expectation, and deadline-focused role critical to the company’s success. I noticed several references during our time together about how narrow and targeted the team’s job is.

VERY NARROW AND VERY TARGETED.

As in, “We’ve learned from experience that we don’t want them drug into other tasks they might be able to contribute to if that causes performance and timeliness to suffer.”

targets-out-of-focus

Makes sense.

I get that they need to be targeted in what they do.

The company positions the team in a tactical, critical path role that would suffer with needless distractions.

Based on the breadth of company and customer issues this team sees, however, you KNOW they are teeming with valuable insights. They could address process improvement ideas and ways to increase their impact. All this, even though I’d bet many people mistakenly see them as order takers.

Job Descriptions Don’t Define Innovation Potential

I asked them to engage in some strategic thinking about innovation opportunities for the company. They immediately played back the mantra about how FOCUSED and NARROW their roles are. They used that as a justification for opting out of strategic thinking.

I disabused them of the idea, however, that their narrow job descriptions were synonymous with narrow strategic thinking roles.

We had a quick conversation about generating ideas for the overall brand. I reminded them (in case no one ever had) that they had a HUGE brand role no matter how narrow everyone thinks they are as a group.

Hearing the interaction and ideas they were generating later when I circled back to them, it was clear that all they needed to dive into great strategic thinking was reassurance that it was OKAY for them to do it. After TALKING about them differently, they eagerly shared the strategic thinking insights they couldn’t help but develop.

The Strategic Thinking Lesson?

A description of a job role isn’t identical to the description of how an individual or group can contribute to solid, dynamic, and innovative strategic thinking.

That’s why leaders should be looking for strategic thinking THROUGHOUT their organizations!   Mike Brown

10 Keys to Engaging Employees to Improve Strategic Results

FREE Download: “Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact”

Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-Book

Leaders need high-impact ways to develop employees that can provide input into strategic planning and then turn it into results. This Brainzooming mini-book, “Results – Creating Strategic Impact” unveils ten proven lessons leaders can use to boost collaboration, meaningful strategic conversations, and results.

Download this free, action-focused mini-book to:

  • Learn smart ways to separate strategic opportunities from the daily noise of business
  • Increase focus for your team with productive strategy questions everyone can use
  • Actively engage stakeholders in strategy AND implementation success

Download Your FREE Results!!! Creating Strategic Impact Mini-book

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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A client raised a question the other day in a Brainzooming strategic thinking workshop about what you can do when you are waiting on someone busy AND important to provide input on an initiative so you can continue making progress.

That is a question I have had to consider and address frequently.

9 Strategic Ideas to Keep Moving without Important Input

I didn’t have time to share all nine of these strategic ideas to keep moving without important input, but I think I’ve used all of them multiple times to try and work around someone else’s slow response when an important timeline needed to keep moving!

  1. Try to get the decision-making authority or latitude to know what things you can advance without going back for input.
  2. Continue advancing the initiative with an eye toward developing several attractive options your input person can review and select.
  3. Reach out to someone that knows your input person well and can provide reliable feedback on how the individual might respond.
  4. Let them know you are using a “you only have until a CERTAIN DATE to provide input or we’re moving ahead” review standard.
  5. Simplify or eliminate other steps in the development process to allow the current schedule to accommodate a longer review and input time.
  6. Keep going on the initiative, making only “safe” choices, i.e., ones that you are sure your input person will approve.
  7. Prioritize work you can easily change if late input derails the direction you have taken.
  8. Prioritize work that does not preclude you from pursuing other viable options your input person might request.
  9. Focus on work that is familiar or adapt something that has already received approval – as long as you understand why the earlier work was approved and can make smart decisions about the new work.

Try one or more of these nine options, and keep pressing for timely input – as best you can! – Mike Brown

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Learn all about how Mike Brown’s workshops on creating strategic impact can boost your organization’s success!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Interestingly, the most challenging situation for Brainzooming strategic thinking workshop success is when it includes TOO MANY individuals viewing themselves as creative.

Yes, you read that right.

Having TOO MANY strong creative perspectives can tank the actionable results coming from a strategic thinking workshop more than having too few creative individuals.

Whenever you have too many “creatives” in the room, it can devolve into each one trying to outshine the others in extreme creativity.

Talking with someone about the most difficult Brainzooming strategic thinking workshop EVER inspired the blurb below. That particular session was filled with about 85% HUGE creative egos. We eventually had to put them in their own creative alliances and work in very small teams (or as individuals) so each one could articulate his or her own creative vision.

By the end, we made progress, but not nearly as much progress as we are accustomed to making.

Servant-Leader-Collaborate

That’s why we like a great balance of people, perspectives, and voices in a strategic thinking workshop. That’s why we like servant leaders that figure out ways to work collaboratively, productively, AND creatively with other members of the team.

So get creative individually. Get creative in a group. And remember that when you are working creatively with a group, be sure to make creative room for others! – Mike Brown

 

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ebook-cover-redoBoost Your Extreme Creativity with “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation”

Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help  generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Contact us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Internal executive videos are funny things.

Well, actually, they are rarely funny things. More frequently, internal executive videos are boring things. Or odd things. Or cringe-worthy things.

Internal-Video

A friend working at a university sends me links occasionally for internal videos featuring a university leader trying for a “rah-rah, pick them up, congratulate and challenge them, but leave them feeling good about themselves” videos. They are heavily scripted (but trying to act as if they aren’t) and delivered in a syrupy, grating style that defines the standard for cringe worthy employee videos.

As I told my friend, it’s as if these videos are employee morale snuff films.

That’s not the way to advance an internal branding strategy.

Alternatively, talking to a nonprofit executive, the issue with her organization’s internal executive videos is execs SAY they want to create videos where they are approachable and relaxed. They then, however, re-watch, re-think, and reject the edited videos because they seem too casual. The question was what to do to get the leadership team comfortable with actually being casual and approachable on camera.

1 Way to Stop Horrible Executive Videos

My suggestion for these videos to have an impact on their internal branding strategy?

Start recording the executives all the time with phones instead of exclusively using video crews and shooting only planned videos. Tell them you are just getting the video to reference for blog posts or press releases with no intention of releasing it. Then, capture them explaining strategy at employee meetings. Video them talking with employees. Ask them simple, direct questions before or after big meetings. Shoot informal moments when they are interacting and relaxed.

The objective is to get them comfortable being on camera when they don’t think it’s going to matter. Then when it’s no longer a big deal for them to be on camera, you can then start introducing these video moments where they are truly relaxed and approachable.

How you break the news to them that you really ARE going to use the videos you said you weren’t going to use?

Well, that’s up to you to figure out! – Mike Brown

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Are you looking for new, more effective ways to engage your employees in shaping and successfully carrying out your brand strategy? You need to download this FREE Brainzooming eBook, published with the Global Strategic Management Institute. You’ll learn three effective strategies to engage employees as an internal brand team.

Download Your FREE eBook! 3 Actionable Strategies for Engaging Your Internal Brand Team

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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