Career | The Brainzooming Group - Part 2 – page 2
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A friend is heading to a business conference by herself today. Over the weekend, she mentioned she is nervous about going because of “everything: driving there, being there alone, not knowing anybody, whether or not to do the dinner cruise thing, just imagining walking into any of the socializing stuff, what to wear, what to do in my down time. Will probably just hide in my luxurious hut.”

I told her she needs to make herself socialize and meet new people at the conference, suggesting she find a friendly face that also doesn’t know anyone and become buddies. She was skeptical based on her most recent experience of showing up alone. As she recalled, “I stood around, walked around, smiled, said hi, introduced myself. Nothing. Except an angry nerd attached himself to me. No grownups were interested.”

I suggested additional ideas, then realized: I was writing a blog post on how I, as an introvert, force myself to meet new people at conferences and business events. Granted, there are LOTS of other sources on this, but this one is based on my personal experiences.

Speaking is a central part of my personal conference networking strategy to meet new people. Speaking helps tremendously in getting people to approach you to chat. If you’re the type of introvert that is fine getting up in front of groups and talking, that’s my number one recommendation.

23 Ideas to Meet New People at a Conference

Here are things I’ve tried (or experienced) to meet new people at conferences where I am not speaking:

Way Before the Conference

#1. Try to convince someone to go with you so you know somebody.

#2. Do whatever you can to scope out the attendees and speakers upfront. Figure out if you have connections to any of them (or even to people in the city where you are headed), and arrange meetings. That’s how I met Diane Black (who has done such great inforgraphics for us) and Mess Wright, both of whom inspired ideas that could re-shape the future of Brainzooming.

#3. Try wearing message clothing. By that, I mean wear a shirt that creates conversation, which may require pre-planning. I met this young woman at Inbound2016. With a shirt like this, I HAD to ask why she was looking for a new boss. I took photos and tweeted them to help her get attention. What message clothes can you create and wear to start converstations?

Right Before the Conference

#4. Pack the clothing or jewelry you own that most often generates comments from others. Wear those as conversation starters. (Orange socks, an orange watch, and all the other orange stuff I have prompt many comments and conversations. Even from other introverts! That’s how I got to know Claire Denbo of engage5w.)

#5. PACK BUSINESS CARDS. ENOUGH SAID.

#6. Find out the conference hashtag(s) ahead of time, and begin monitoring them. Reach out to other attendees and speakers using the hashtag. Ask and answer questions to start building relationships.

#7. If there are free times for lunch or dinner, book a reservation for four at a nearby restaurant and start asking people you meet to join you (and bring friends). I tried this the first time at the GasCan conference; long-time friend Kathryn Lorenzen became my anchor guest, bringing two other friends, while I invited Mike Farag of Fervor. We had a fantastic lunch!

#8. Prepare a few open-ended, easy-to-answer multiple part questions to ask. Prepare to use them. Try, “Is this your first time at the conference?” If it is, ask why they chose it or what they are looking forward to at the event. If they are returning, ask why they came back, and what you should not miss. This helps you uncover experts you can depend on or refer others to for meet-ups.

Onsite Before the Conference Starts

#9. If the registration is informal, chat with the people handling registration. Let them know this is a new environment for you, and you’d love to meet new folks. Maybe even give them a card or two that includes a way to track you down onsite. Tell them if they come across anyone looking for a buddy, you’re interested in hanging out with others.

#10. Arrive early and get the lay of the land in and around the conference facility so you can easily answer questions. Take on the role of being an informal conference concierge since answering questions is a great way to meet people. Be ready to point people to where meeting rooms and bathrooms are, know how long it takes from the elevators to the conference area, figure out fun things to do, where to eat, and the closest convenience and drugstores.

#11. Get up to speed on the agenda in a deep way. Understand the event flow, themes for the day or evening, and when things are. This positions you to pipe up with answers and meet people that will be at your table and ask general questions about the conference hoping someone can answer them.

During the Conference

#12. Wear your nametag. Make sure it’s visible. If it keeps flipping around, rig a binder clip to hold it in place.

#13. Be deliberate about your seating strategy at sessions with round tables. You can join a group and have people to start talking with right away (asking if a chair is free, introducing yourself, asking a question, etc.) Alternatively, you can scope out a table where no one is sitting. You then “own” the space and can play the role of a host. Either one works. One may suit you better than the other, though.

#14. Serve other people at the conference. Stock up on cough drops, mints, phone chargers, an extension cord, pens, and paper. Know how to download and use the conference app. Sit near the water pitcher at a table so you can offer to pour water or go get a drink for someone that just sat down. Be the one to get the Uber or car pool arranged. Those are easy ways for an introvert to meet new people and seem as if you are one of the most engaging people at the conference.

#15. Compare schedules with others. Learn what sessions they are attending. If it makes sense content-wise, give preference to sessions where you suspect you’re going to find people you have already met. (While it wasn’t a conference, this is why I, as a political science undergrad major, took a summer school accounting class: a woman I was interested in was going to be taking it, and so I just happened to be taking it, too.)

#16. Take advantage of social media to reach out and increase your visibility. Live tweet the sessions you attend (I’ve had people change sessions and meet me based on live tweets that made where I was sound more interesting.) Change the profile pics on social networks daily so they show what you look like and are wearing. This makes it very easy to spot you in a crowd.

#17. Type up your top ten take-aways from the day’s events and publish a blog post that evening or before the conference begins the next morning. Share it using the conference hashtag so people notice you are there. Invite conference goers reading the post to reach out to you at the event to request your full set of notes afterward.

#18. Unless you are actively using your phone for networking with social media (be honest here), leave it in your purse or pocket. Don’t make it look like your phone is your date for the event.

#19. Be careful with how you approach uber-confident, uber-outgoing, and uber-interested in telling everyone how great everything is people. I don’t know about you, but they can suck away what networking energy I have and leave me beating myself up for not being more outgoing and successful. That means I, at least, must be very careful about how much time I spend trying to hang out around them.

Networking Events

#20. Sign up for networking events and excursions. Make yourself go. Boost your confidence that you can enjoy these events on your own, while you look for opportunities to share experiences with others!

#21. Know how much alcohol gets you to where you start being engaging. Be careful if you need to drive afterward, but get to that amount of alcohol early on at a networking event to loosen up your conversation skills.

#22. Find other people that are alone and appear uneasy but hopeful. Reach out to them, essentially offering them an opportunity to be a part of a posse. Invite them to the group lunch or dinner you are planning!

#23. Look for small groups at networking events, ideally with people you’ve seen at sessions during the day. Find a way to join them through proximity, listening, smiling, and shared interests (i.e., you all are at this event, were in some of the same sessions, and have drinks). Being around the crowd can be the right opening to start meeting other people on the edge of the crowd.

That’s Not All the Ideas

I’m sure there are more ideas than this for an introvert to meet new people at a conference, but since this is probably the longest Brainzooming post ever, that’s all for today! – Mike Brown

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During the Lenten season, which starts today (Ash Wednesday), Christians are called to sacrifice in a spirit of reflection and prayer. The point is to distance ourselves from the attractive nuisances of daily living that chip away at our spiritual lives.

Lies We Tell Ourselves

Entering this Lenten season, I’m thinking a lot about expectations and evaluations. Not expectations and evaluations from others, but those we render personally about ourselves.

For as long as I can remember, I tell myself I am not doing well enough or am not performing up to expectations. These are powerful personal motivators for me. In MBA school, I used to worry that each semester’s finals could be the ones that caused me to flunk out of college. In reality, that wasn’t even a remote possibility. Yet, this self-expectation drove me to study harder. It also made me physically ill every semester.

That’s a strong example of lying to yourself in a tremendously self-destructive way.

The same mentality drives me in business, too. Some shortcomings I’m trying to fill are real. Many (maybe most), however, are lies I tell myself to keep pushing harder.

Among other things, this Lent will involve for me trying to be more honest with myself. Self-lies about needing to do more work (or more whatever) have become too much a part of immersing myself in the world. They have detracted from my spiritual life. They cause me to get away from practices that are important to staying healthy and more productive overall.

I’m looking to honesty as an important part of making sure I’m investing my time and energy in the places God (and not Mike) wants.

A Creativity Prayer

As we’ve done for years on Ash Wednesday, here is our creativity prayer. It’s right at the intersection of my spiritual and personal lives. And if you say it, drop in a little prayer for me, please. Thank you!

A Creativity Prayer

Lord, Thank you for creation itself and the incredible gifts and talents you so generously entrust to me. May I appreciate and develop these talents, always recognizing that they come from you and remain yours. Guide me in using them for the benefit of everyone that I touch, so that they may be more aware of your creative presence and develop the creativity entrusted to them for the good of others. Help me also to use your talents to bring a creative spark and new possibilities to your world, living out my call to be an integral part of your creative force. Amen.

©2008, Mike Brown

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Are you in a job that looks, from the outside, as if it is perfectly stable, engaging, good paying, and the kind of position that people in your profession would die to get?

Yet you, as the person in the job, feel trapped, under siege, and desperate to do almost anything else, but you can’t leave.

What’s up with that?

Maybe it’s golden handcuffs, or you’ve been trying to find another job for a long time, but you can’t land anyplace. Possibly you want to launch your own gig, but it’s not the right time.

Whatever the reason, you can’t leave that shitty job, which leaves you feeling demoralized, powerless, and stuck with no clear career strategy to fix your situation.

Dear Job, I Can’t Quit You

If you’re mired in a situation like this, what should your career strategy be? Here are some ideas:

Actively work to lower your dependence on the current job, as best you can.

Put yourself in a position – financially, emotionally, or whatever else – to need this job less.

Make the crappy job as small a part of your life as possible.

Fill your outside life with incredible experiences as a way to sustain yourself through the miserable times in your job.

Assess what is beneficial and good about the job.

Once you identify those things, work like crazy to maximize those parts of the job. Even if they are a small part of what you do, find ways to do more of those things.

On the job, conduct yourself as if you might quit the job at any time.

Don’t succumb to acting like you are dependent on the job, even if you are. Just as in a personal relationship, you want to create a sense that you don’t need it if you hope to retain some power for self-determination.

Separate your personality from the job.

You can’t let yourself become synonymous with the job. It’s a job. You are you. That’s true before, during, and AFTER you have the job. Don’t define yourself within the context of the job.

Keep working on quitting.

Step up your energy and focus on getting out if it’s too miserable to continue. Don’t lull yourself into sticking around for your own career destruction.

Own Your Career Strategy

That’s my advice to stay sane and move your career strategy to a place where you can say: Dear Job, I’m Going to Quit You Right Now! – Mike Brown

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It’s Valentine’s Day. What better time for a retrospective on love in, if not all, at least a few of its varied forms. We hope you love it!

Creative Love

Creative Thinking – 6 Challenges Before Loving Your New Idea Too Much

Maybe you shouldn’t love your idea at first sight. Give it some time to grow into it.

Managing Clients Who Love Their Creative Ideas

People can love their own thinking too much. Here are ways to handle that when the people are your clients.

Strategic Relationships – 9 Principles for Being a Great Client

Here’s the flip of the previous link, covering the things the create a “client crush,” as one of the Brainzooming team members puts it!

Real Love

6 Personal Relationship Lessons from My Parents’ Marriage

Love has to be front and center to last 60+ years in a marriage. Here are just six lessons from a long-lasting marriage.

Life Lessons – 12 Free Holiday Gifts

Telling someone you love them doesn’t cost a thing. And neither do any of these other ideas to show someone you care about them in a non-material way.

Work Love

What do you LOVE about your business?

Don’t get so bogged down in the daily grind of your business that you miss the love that should be there.

Making Decision Making Easier – She Loves Me, She Loves Me Not

Do you love this idea or not? Here’s one way to decide.

Career Challenges – 6 Ideas when Losing the Love for What You Do

When the love goes away in your job, don’t sit idly by and accept it.

Personal Love

9 Reasons to Love an Underdog

I unabashedly love underdogs, even if some people think I don’t understand what a true underdog is!

Life Lessons – 30 Things My Dad Taught Me

Looking back with love at some of the things my father taught me about business, life, and what’s really important.

Questioning Love

What We Love Is Failing Us – Thoughts on Shooting and Violence

Exploring why what our country seems to love is harming our nation.

Mike Brown

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Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help  generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Contact us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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A recent Brainzooming article on changing your personal backstory recommended ensuring how you think about, describe, and conduct yourself maximizes the positive sentiments you generate among others. One input to revise your personal backstory is to ask how others see you. This suggestions prompted a question on what you should ask others (and how you should ask them) to get the best input for reshaping your backstory.

Ask people in a format that allows them to respond anonymously. You want to increase the likelihood they are going to share unvarnished sentiments with you. The easiest way to accomplish that is likely through some type of online survey.

7 Questions to Ask Others about Your Personal Backstory

personal-backstory-erase

Here are specific questions based off of those we use when developing personality-based brands. The input you will receive can help you decide what to add to and erase from your personal backstory:

  1. In a few sentences, what are your perceptions of who I am?
  2. What are words you associate with me?
  3. What are negative things you associate with me?
  4. What are positive things you associate with me?
  5. If you were introducing me to someone else, what would you say to them?
  6. In what capacity do you know me – professional, personal, or both?
  7. What’s our level of contact – used to be greater than it is now, it’s greater now than it used to be, or it’s been fairly consistent over time?

It would be great to be a bit more specific on the last two questions. You don’t want to be so specific about relationship questions, however, that people feel as if their answers will tip off who they are.

Across even five to ten people you should have a richer set of input than if you tried to revise your personal backstory based on your own thinking. – Mike Brown

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This shouldn’t be a newsflash, but it needs to be said: You are completely free to edit your personal backstory.

Each of us has a backstory.

A personal backstory is what we say about ourselves (along with our behaviors, physical cues, and beliefs that may speak louder than our words) about how we reached where we are right now. A backstory provides others an important input toward beginning to form perceptions about you.

Ideally, your backstory provides a strong representation of your path to where you are and helps people quickly understand where you can benefit them (and where they might be able to benefit you).

In a less than ideal situation, your personal backstory can limit you in who you start believing you are, what you can imagine yourself doing, and even the people you associate with personally and professionally.

Your Personal Backstory Can Change

Personal-Backstory

That brings us back to the starting point: there is nothing to stop you if you want to edit your personal backstory to serve you better than it does right now.

I was chatting with a friend that has lost touch with some of her talents and very positive characteristics. She hasn’t used certain talents as fully as she did in the years leading up to her current job. These talents have essentially disappeared from how she thinks and talks about herself with others.

We discussed the benefit from editing her backstory to open up possibilities or make her diverse experiences work hard to boldly communicate in professional settings.

What’s your personal backstory?

Is it helping or hurting you?

While you may have some sense of how others perceive your backstory, it’s worthwhile to ask them. Talk to people around you (both very and less familiar with you) that can help you better understand how your backstory plays for them.

If the personal backstory others perceive isn’t serving you well, edit and revise it to serve you better.

No one is going to stop you. It’s yours to decide. – Mike Brown

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There are multiple types of people I love, including :

  • Underdogs
  • Those that patiently build success by deliberately following a plan
  • People that display unwavering loyalty
  • A leader willing to a make decision not in his or her own best interests because it’s the right thing to do
  • Those that prize honesty, openness, and vulnerability over gamesmanship, manipulation, and never failing to exploit any advantage

I don’t know how correlated all of those characteristics are with people that have successful strategic relationships.

An article in The Kansas City Star about Dayton Moore, the general manager of the Kansas City Royals, however, suggests all of these characteristics intersect in how Moore has rebuilt the Royals and created a positive organizational culture.

Strategic-Relationships-Day

If I were to attempt to summarize the great lessons about strategic relationships in the article here, I would wind up repeating all the quotes from Dayton Moore and those speaking about how he does business.

So if you want to learn rich, meaningful lessons in the right way to approach strategic relationships, read the article by Vahe Gregorian from Sunday’s Kansas City Star.

For any of our readers that try to cultivate strong strategic relationships and the personal characteristics listed above, it will be well worth your time to leave this article right now and go read up on how Dayton Moore does business. Even if you AREN’T a baseball or Kansas City Royals fan!

Trust me! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

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Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help  generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Contact us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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