Collaboration | The Brainzooming Group - Part 117 – page 117
3

It’s always great to solicit and consider expert opinions. It’s not so great, though, when qualified experts don’t agree, and you have to decide and act.

Being confronted with this situation recently (4 physicians, none of whom agreed on the appropriate course of action) caused me to reflect on decision factors to be considered when this happens. These issues seem applicable in comparable situations you may face:

  • What are the experience levels among dissenting parties? Are they generalists and/or specialists?
  • How long has each expert been involved with the situation? Does more tenure translate into greater expertise?
  • Are there differences in the risk/benefit perspectives among the experts?
  • Do any of the experts have a personal or vested interest in a particular outcome? Does a preference create disproportional bias on a particular expert’s perspective?
  • Is there a more solid logic behind one point of view vs. another?
  • How do the relationships among the experts play into the difference of opinion?
  • How willing is each expert to consider and learn from new information?
  • Are any experts in roles that create a disproportionate bias?
  • If assistants are involved, how do they react relative to the experts they are or aren’t affiliated with?

In the situation I faced, it appears we made the right decision.

We took the most experienced expert’s point of view; he also had the most tenure and personal interest in the situation. The medical specialist, who was newest to the case and most reluctant to act, demonstrated role bias, made an illogical risk assessment, and had a wonderful P.A. who gave ample cues that she wasn’t fully in support of his position. He was willing, however, to accept new information, and went ahead with the (successful) surgery he was initially reluctant to perform.

So, what questions or criteria do you use to figure out which expert to believe?  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

2

“Hitting a Creative Brick Wall” by @Pretty_Awkward


Work work work work, short break,
work work work work, potty break,
work work work, quick snack,
work work work, BOOM! Creative brick wall.

Yet another delightful example of the incredible creativity being shared on Twitter, if you know where and when to look for it. This one appeared in the middle of the night earlier this week.

Here’s a question: Can any of us come up with a comparably elegant and simple word depiction of getting around a creative brick wall?

I’d love to share your creations here. Maybe @Pretty_Awkward might even favor us with an answer post!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

Today’s post for World Creativity and Innovation Week comes through a Twitter connection with Gwen Ishmael, Senior VP, Insights and Innovation at Decision Analyst in Dallas. Gwen has worked across a variety of industries in branding and marketing, with leadership roles in new product and service development. She spoke at the marcus evans Open Innovation conference last week, and shares her perspectives on themes from the conference:

This month’s 3rd Annual Open Innovation conference in Las Vegas saw B2B and B2C firms coming together to share open innovation (OI) best practices and tools. Unlike other events I’ve attended, these companies embraced the concept of openness and spoke candidly about how they had achieved their successes and where they’re trying to improve.

Headway is being made in addressing OI resistance. For some, the quest for external inspiration and contribution is actively promoted by executive management. Chris Thoen, Director of Innovation and Knowledge Management at P&G, says CEO A.G. Lafley’s long-standing direction for “50% of P&G’s initiatives to have at least one significant external partner” has helped change the “not invented here” mindset to one of “proudly found elsewhere.” Other efforts, such as the Alcan Packaging customer-centric Idea Factory, have been championed by those further down in the organization.

The quest for meaningful and relevant measures of OI return on investment continues. Director of Capital Investments and Innovation Strategy at Embarq, Jeff Stafford, shared an interesting approach based on Monte Carlo simulation in which potential sell scenarios and associated cash flows were used to determine the viability of an idea. And Brian Johnston, Director of External Alliances for Kodak, presented a six-question evaluative framework Kodak and its partners used to jointly define success.

Yet for me one theme rose above the others, which Jeff Bellairs, G-Win Director for General Mills, captured in a wonderfully simple phrase: “Open Innovation is not about being external. It’s about being connected.” Jason Husk, Group Manager Technology Brokerage for Clorox, supported this stance and presented a symbiotic relationship between technology, consumers, and business results as a model for connection. And Chris Thoen announced P&G’s launch of Connect + Develop 2.0 OI model through which the company will focus on collaborating with partners for mutual value creation.

It appears companies are successfully working through initial OI issues related to internal sell-in of OI as a good idea and decisions on the right partners to consider. Now they’re progressing to the next stage and addressing the kinds of relationships to have with partners and the appropriate ways to foster them.

With connection as the tactic for implementing an OI strategy, true collaboration between a company and its partners – whether they’re universities, other firms, customers, or consumers – becomes more possible.


TweetIt from HubSpot

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

2

It was a pleasure to do a segment Monday on High Velocity Radio with hosts Stone Payton and Lee Kantor talking about a variety of innovation topics. I met Stone initially via Twitter back in January, and appearing on Stone’s show was part of the prize for winning the IDEF140 contest he sponsored.

We covered a range of issues, so beyond a link to the radio show, here are links to many of the topics we discussed during our conversation.

Thanks again Stone and Lee for the opportunity to be on the show, and I look forward to being able to do it again in the future!

TweetIt from HubSpot

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

The past several weeks I’ve put out a Thursday or Friday tweet requesting topic suggestions for Brainzooming.

One request last weekend was for a discussion on TRIZ, a topic unfamiliar to me. In a very nice gesture, the original requester, Greg Cimmarrusti from Atlanta, agreed to write a guest post on the topic. Greg’s 20-year background includes project management, systems analysis, implementation, and business development within the high tech, manufacturing, real estate, entertainment, and government sectors. His interests include Mind Mapping, Creative Thinking and Organization Techniques.

Greg’s post is based in part on a presentation at the Atlanta Creativity Exchange by Jack Hipple, principal of Innovation-TRIZ.com and an authority on the subject:

What is TRIZ? TRIZ is the Russian acronym for “Theory of Inventive Problem Solving.” Soviet engineer and researcher Genrich Altshuller and his colleagues developed the methodology in 1946 and for the next 40 years improved its design. TRIZ is the science of the study of the patterns of problems and solutions. Millions of patents were analyzed to discover patterns that led to breakthrough solutions to specific problems.

The three primary research processes to create TRIZ were as follows:

  1. Problems and solutions are repeated across industries and sciences. The classification of the contradictions in each problem predicts the creative solutions to that problem.
  2. Patterns of technical evolution are also repeated across industries and sciences.
  3. Creative innovations use scientific effects outside the field where they were developed.
    TRIZ is based on resolving contradictions and has 40 principles to do so.

Using these known 40 principles (solutions) in new challenges can bring innovative solutions. All innovated creations are purported to be found in the matrix of 40 principles.

One example of TRIZ is the creation of the TWEEL (combination of tire and wheel) and the solution to flat tires. The original tire had an inner tube. Once the inner tube was punctured, the tire was useless until the inner tube was replaced or repaired. This led to the invention of the tubeless tire in use today. Michelin then abstracted this one level up and combined the tire and the wheel. Using a non-inflated tire, the wheel lightly compresses to give a more comfortable ride.

For further information refer to TRIZ40.com, TRIZ-Journal.com, and AITRIZ.org. The matrix of the 40 principles is available for download. There are also general articles on TRIZ and Genrich Altshuller on Wikipedia.com and gizmag.com that provided additional background for this article. — Greg Cimmarrusti

Thanks Greg for sharing TRIZ with us (and based on the fun headline, I may need to hire you to write headlines for Brainzooming)! And as an added treat, here’s a video of Genrich Altshuller teaching TRIZ; you can find more of these on YouTube as well.


TweetIt from HubSpot

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

2

I’m at the Charlotte, NC Business Marketing Association Lunch today speaking on “Taking the NO Out of Business InNOvation.” If you’re on Twitter, check out the hashtag #ncBMAlunch to see if we get some live tweets going!

Talking about the same topic at last Thursday’s KU class prompted a question on how to challenge ideas without being seen as a naysayer. Here are 3 tips to avoid getting labeled as negative:

1. Don’t Telegraph Your Comments

People often begin a challenge by clearly signaling through their body language (confrontational), tone (frustrated or agitated), or words (but, don’t, can’t, instead, etc.) they’re about to challenge something. Here’s an alternative – stop doing those things! Think hopefully about the conversation, looking for points of agreement; this will help modify your body language and tone. Then simply start building on the other person’s idea, even modifying it, without allowing your words and attitude to suggest you disagree.

2. Conceal Your Sources

People are also often very sincere in saying where an idea comes from, even when it really doesn’t matter. This happens frequently with new hires who trot out ideas prefaced by, “Here’s what we did at my old company.” The typical reaction? “If your old company is so great, why aren’t you still there?” In contrast, introduce a potentially challenging idea without any attribution, foregoing even claiming your own ideas. By allowing an idea to be introduced on its own, you can start getting consideration for it without any negative baggage its original source may create.

3. Give Your Ideas Away

What might be viewed as a challenging point of view from you may be seen as completely innocuous when coming from someone else in the group. The key here is to be comfortable with sharing an idea with a receptive party, letting them build and modify the idea, and then confidently in allowing them to introduce the idea if it means a higher likelihood of successful adoption.

Try these three, and you’ll be a lot less likely to be seen as giving NO for an answer.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

4

Speaking and travel are both great sources of inspiration for blog topics. Twitter has become another one as well. This week, we’ll feature posts inspired through each of these sources.

Brainzooming – Being Perceived as a Strategic Leader

Last Thursday I spoke at Max Utsler’s Innovation in Marketing Communications class at Kansas University, debuting the new version of “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” summarized here a number of weeks ago. It seemed very appropriate since the first version of the presentation came from speaking to Max’s class 5 years ago!

One topic we discussed was the idea of very subtle ways to demonstrate a strategic perspective. This includes taking notes and recapping meetings to allow you to shape the conversation as it happens and afterward. One student voiced the concern that taking and typing notes can get you cast in an “administrative” role. It’s a valid concern, yet one that’s easily avoided. Here’s how:

Employ these two approaches and meeting participants will notice the difference. You won’t be mistaken as playing an administrative role. Trust me – I’ve seen it work time after time.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading