Collaboration | The Brainzooming Group - Part 120 – page 120
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When you’re challenged, who will _______________________?

  • Inspire you?
  • Have a philosophical conversation with you?
  • Give you a pep talk?
  • Guide you through it?
  • Help you be a better person?
  • Tell you things will work out?
  • Challenge you some more?

Do you have answers to all these questions? Are you the answer to some (all) of these questions for the important people in your life? If either answer is “no,” you have some reaching out to do with others!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Wrap up for “Let Other People Talk” week features a few more quotes and links on various Brainzooming-oriented topics, nearly all from Twitter.

Quotes
@CynthiaY29: “Creativity takes courage.” Henri Matisse

@artrox: Charles Handy “The modern economies will not be constrained by lack of resources but only by lack of creativity & ideas.”

RT @boxofcrayons: RT @joevans: From Sir Ken Robinson: “If you are not prepared to be wrong — you will not come up with anything original.

RT @CreativityBoost: Action is the best way to give doubt the middle finger. via @johnhaydon
Best quote heard so far this week: “Slow down and think so you can go fast.”

RT @Orrin_Woodward: “The successful leader gets superior performance from ordinary people”. ~Al Kaltman

RT @sallyhogshead: We were born w/ the ability to do 1 thing better than anyone else on earth. Trick is to find out exactly what YOURS is.

@AdamTheHutt: Some interviewee on NPR just declared that “motherhood is the necessity of innovation”…funny idea if you think about

@Zindella: Aristotle once said: Today I am short of time, so I am going to write you a long letter.

Links

Free Ideas Ready for You to Implement! Wacha Waitin’ For? RT @plish: Hamster Burial Kits & 998 Other Business Ideas http://post.ly/1Yb

50% of companies look for strategic thinking RT @davidharkleroad: Best Companies for Ldrs, Chief Exec Magazine: http://tinyurl.com/bhuc5p

The importance of group dynamics RT @stef: The qualities that make a successful innovator are actually ones a group shares http://is.gd/juOB

Also from Heart of Innovation – 100 Lamest Reasons Not to Innovate in 2009 http://tinyurl.com/79t3t3

Heart of Innovation on “56 Reasons Business Innovation Fails” http://tinyurl.com/5df2mm
RT @mindfulmimi: Enthusiasm is excitement with inspiration, motivation, and a pinch of creativity – Bo Bennett http://ff.im/13vPD

Comment: New way of presenting food groups RT @plish: Mindmap of foods to boost productivity (and creativity!) http://tinyurl.com/cz5h4c

Cool cust exp mktg! RT @gabysslave:..sometimes wish i had clients prepared 2b challenged w/ really great ideas like this http://bit.ly/Po7Fp

Read the Great Springboard Blog! RT @kevinfullerton: Follow Your Connections to the End http://tinyurl.com/cxad3u

Hope you’ve enjoyed the variety this week. See you back here next week!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’m a contemplator and planner by nature, trying to figure out all potential angles first. It’s who I am.

When starting the blog, however, Kathryn Lorenzen, a wonderful career coach (trust me – contact her), suggested diving in more aggressively before understanding everything about blogging. Great advice, and much of Brainzooming is about approaches to do that more.

One way I’ve become comfortable with the idea is being more open to noticing and following “hints” placed in front of me and acting on them.

An example last week was participating in the Twitter-based IDEF140 contest devised by Stone Payton. The week was full of “hints”:

Follow that Tweet@stonepayton tweeted Saturday, January 17 on a contest to define “innovation” in less than 140 characters with a $100 prize. Sounded cool, so I wrote one (Innovation = A fundamental, valuable improvement relative to the status quo) and tweeted it Saturday, thinking that was it.

Reach Out – I considered lifting the contest idea since $100 is cheap for diverse input on Twitter to help expand understanding on a topic (i.e. “creative instigation”). That was until Stone raised the potential prize to $1000. Suddenly stealing the cheap idea involved a higher prize expectation. After tweeting Stone (jokingly) about pricing “idea thieves” out of the market, it created a tweet and email conversation about alternatives. That led to visiting each others’ blogs, LinkedIn networking, and finding Chuck Dymer as a common connection.

Keeping Up with @Macker – Throughout the week, definitions were added to IDEF140 (as it became known). @Macker seemed to have an unlimited number of definitions. Seeing that forced me to write others, including a more mathematically oriented one and another (my personal favorite) tied to “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation.”

Mounting a Campaign – When voting started Thursday, I wasn’t planning much campaigning. Then two hints surfaced – Sally Hogshead voted for entry #2, and the organizers said a modest get out of the vote campaign could mean a win. That prompted a more aggressive Twitter, blog, and email effort (including a cut and paste tweet) for votes. My dad and Jan Harness signed up for Twitter and some infrequent tweeters returned to Twitter!

What Matters Is Helping Others – Trying to win wasn’t about the eventual $200 prize. It was about learning of possibilities from new online endeavors. After discovering I won (thanks everybody that voted!), I saw Stone supports the Furniture Bank of Metro Atlanta which helps recently homeless people and others in challenging situations secure basic furniture items (i.e., bedding, sofa, etc.). That seemed like a lot more appropriate recipient for the prize money, so it went to @FBMA.

That was last week. Diving in and following hints led to “meeting” intriguing people, challenging myself to think more about innovation, introducing friends to social media, identifying a potential opportunity to work with Sally Hogshead, and helping people financially who really need it!

Thanks for the “diving in” advice Kathryn. As always, it’s been a huge help!!!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Have a creative challenge you’re struggling with? Have a Friday afternoon creative bunch tackle it.

Get your creative team together mid-afternoon this Friday, head to an empty restaurant with a big table (preferably with paper tablecloths for writing ideas), spring for appetizers and drinks, and get their help innovatively addressing your challenge.

A co-worker had a naming challenge last week. On Friday, we followed this approach – bringing along some starter ideas – and with minimal set-up, had a great far-reaching discussion about naming and its broader implications for his effort. To his surprise, within 45 minutes, we had a longer and richer list of ideas than his group had been able to generate over a several week period.

So if you have a problem to solve, what is your creative bunch doing Friday afternoon?

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Remember the song, “Good King Wenceslas looked out on the Feast of Stephen?” Remember the song, “Rainy Day Woman #12 and #35?”

They’re both about stoning . . . so to speak.

Today, December 26 is the feast of Stephen, the first martyr, who was stoned to death in the first century. In his Feast of St. Stephen sermon, Fr. Gilmary Tallman spoke about two reasons why stoning, although illegal under Roman law, was used.

Lorenzo_Lotto_-_The_Martyrdom_of_St_Stephen_-_WGA13671

The first was stoning was a graphic and very painful form of death; it sent a clear message to others you shouldn’t do what the person who was being stoned had done. Secondly, stoning was a group activity, so no one individual had any personal responsibility for carrying out the stoning.

When you put it that way, it makes stoning sound like many (most) modern business meetings:

  • We convene with a group think mentality
  • Perhaps one bold person offers an original idea
  • The group kills the idea (and potentially the person) en masse through its invective and takes great satisfaction knowing any future upstarts with bold ideas will keep quiet to avoid a similar fate.

One thing Brainzooming is about is helping you get new ideas introduced and implemented without your group even realizing it so your next team meeting doesn’t turn into a corporate version of the Feast of Stephen.

Here’s to more creative Brainzooming subterfuge in the new year! – Mike Brown

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at  816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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On my Labor Day road trip, I listened to “Live at the BBC,” a 2-cd set of recordings The Beatles made on BBC Radio from March 1962 to June 1965. It made me think about an old book definitely worth checking out if you’re interested in the musical creative process.

“The Playboy Interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono” is a transcript of interviews the pair did with writer David Sheff right before Lennon’s death in 1980. In one section, Lennon walked through the entire Beatles catalog, discussing the creative origin of each song with Paul McCartney. Sometimes it was true collaboration; at times it was the other person adding a small, yet critical element that made the song. Many times, particularly in later years, it was primarily individual creation. Yet because of publishing agreements, and perhaps a recognition that their creative styles were inexorably shaped by each other, all of their songs were jointly credited as Lennon-McCartney.

R.E.M. in its original line-up also credited every song to all members – Berry/Buck/Mills/Stipe – irrespective of how it was composed, acknowledging that through the recording process, each band member had shaped the final creation.

I’ve always loved that creative team approach. In the best creative work in which I’ve participated, I enjoy the phenomenon that once it’s done, it’s very difficult to actually recall which person contributed which theme, idea, line, or edit.

That truly reflects a collaborative creative team.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Jan Harness and I are continuing to work on the “Creative Instigation” presentation and book for our August 12 Kansas City PRSA session. We’ve been working individually, but also carving out time to collaborate. Some joint meetings have been more productive than others. One last week was particularly beneficial in getting the presentation order and transitions finalized. So what’s been the common denominator in the productive get togethers?

It might be surprising, but in the two best working sessions, we didn’t sit across from each other. We sat on the same side of the table and spread the materials in front of us so that we both had the same perspective on what we working on at the time.

So while I frequently extol the virtues of diverse perspectives, there is also a place for trying to create the same perspective too!

Register today for the session if you’re in KC, and also vote in the poll about creativity at work!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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