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Here is the Sunday Dilbert comic strip, with yet another futile attempt by Dilbert’s boss to lead his team in brainstorming for creative new product ideas. As with any recent Dilbert comic strip on coming up with creative new product ideas, it presents a dismal view of creativity at the company where Dilbert works.

Dilbert.com

By way of contrast, here are two items that can help you think about and enhance creativity in your organization. One of them is even targeted at boosting your creativity when you are working alone!

One Analogy for Boosting Creativity with a Group

I have been thinking about how creative teams or any team you are working with on brainstorming is like a basketball team. Sometimes the five players on the court are great and performing well together as a basketball team. Other times, the five players playing are clearly not the right five, and a basketball coach needs to do something differently whether it is a different combination of players or different types of offensive or defensive strategies. Still other times, the basketball coach needs the team to get the basketball to one particular player and let them make the play by themselves.

If you are going to perform well at basketball or coming up with new creative ideas, you need to have a deep bench, versatile players, a variety of plays, and the right go-to person.

That is why we write about creativity so frequently. There is a lot of work to do have all those options available. To simplify your creative challenges very tremendous efficiency and effectiveness, email us, and we will make it happen for you!

A New Tool for Personal Creativity

There is a new tool for personal creativity from our friend and guest Brainzooming blogger Tanner Christensen who has released the Oflow app for iPhone. The Oflow app offers more than one hundred approaches for boosting your creativity, allowing users to highlight their most productive creativity methods and capture ideas for themselves and to share with others.

You can download Oflow from the iTunes App Store, so check out what Tanner Christensen has brought to the market!

So go out, get creative, and don’t put up with crappy creativity in your workplace like they have to where Dilbert works! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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As last week’s post about showing appreciation on Twitter started, “social media is about being social, whether you are an individual or are representing a brand.” And in response to a status update on Facebook about the Twitter appreciation post, a grade school friend I’ve become reacquainted with on Facebook over the past year, Carrie Sparkman, essentially said it would be nice to see how the Twitter etiquette rules I shared would translate to Facebook.

That was an intriguing request since I spend a lot more time on Twitter. But since Carrie is particularly wonderful at Number 1 below, I was compelled to try and address her request.

These nine etiquette ideas for showing appreciation to Facebook friends are some suggestions to make your shout out really count:

Showing Appreciation

1. Make It Personal

Write a personal, heartfelt, and encouraging comment for a Facebook friend who has made a difference for you and post it on their wall. Or even better, write an encouraging comment for someone who needs YOU to make a difference for them.

2. Don’t Just Like Them

Go beyond liking another person’s Facebook status update and actually share their content with your friends as well. Include your comment about your appreciation for the person, their accomplishment, or their content. You can also share photos or video of the person you want to celebrate.

Calling Attention to Your Appreciation for Your Facebook Friend

3. Tag, They’re It

Actually tag the person you are showing appreciation for in your update. You can tag a person by first typing the “@” symbol and then the person’s name. People whose names match what you’re typing will start appearing on screen; hit enter on the correct person to enter a link to their profile. If you want to only use the person’s first name in the update link, backspace over the last name to erase it while still keeping the link to the individual.

4. Let the Public See It

When you’re showing your appreciation for a Facebook friend, change the sharing criteria (from the drop down toward the lower left of the message) on the status so that it is “Public.” That way, the widest possible audience can see what you have to say. Be sure to change the sharing status back to what you typically use before you make your next update, however.

5. Linking of Others

Provide a link to where people can learn more about the person you appreciate, i.e. to a blog or website. In this way, people can connect with them on places other than Facebook.

Be Both Predictable and Surprising

6. Happy Birthday

Take advantage of the Facebook Happy Birthday notifications to share a few words of celebration and a birthday greeting with Facebook friends. If you’re in touch with them on other social networking platforms (especially email), consider sharing Happy Birthday greetings there.

7. I Wanna Like You All Over

When you see great content from a Facebook friend somewhere else on the web, click the Facebook Like button associated with the content to show your appreciation.

8. Surprise Someone

Don’t just show appreciation for those you interact with frequently. Show appreciation to your Facebook friends for no apparent reason, especially if you haven’t interacted with someone for an extended period of time.

Don’t Call Undue Attention to Yourself

9. Cool It on Facebook Apps

Another way to show appreciation? Be purposeful about what you share with your Facebook friends. Don’t use Facebook:

  • To invite people to events they have no hope of ever attending
  • To send them Facebook app requests that clog their Facebook notifications
  • As a repository for other websites to post your activity on their sites while filling your Facebook status updates with low value information.

What are your etiquette ideas when you show appreciation on Facebook?

What are you doing to show appreciation to Facebook friends? What do you find works best for you, or even better, what encouraging messages do you appreciate seeing show up for you? – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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4

Kansas City was blessed with two significant architectural design innovation breakthrough project in the last third of the 20th century, with both coming from the same architectural tree—the firm of Kivett and Myers.

One design innovation was Kauffman Stadium (nee Royals Stadium) and its fraternal twin at the Truman Sports Complex, Arrowhead Stadium, set the standard for modern sports design. The Kansas City firms attached to Kauffman Stadium and Arrowhead Stadium made Kansas City ground zero for architectural design innovation in sports stadiums, ballparks, and arenas. Hardly a major sports stadium or arena gets built globally without a Kansas City architecture firm being involved or being the benchmark against which other firms are judged.

Source: Kansas City Aviation Department

The other architectural design innovation breakthrough was Kansas City International Airport (KCI). After it opened (also in the early ‘70s), it became the model for airports from Dallas to Germany to France to South America. Kansas City International Airport was designed on a “drive to your gate” concept that allowed departing local passengers to have as little as a 75 foot walk from the vehicle depositing them on the terminal curb to the entrance to the airport jet way.

As a result, if you live in Kansas City, you love Kansas City International Airport. If, on the other hand, you have connected through Kansas City, you probably hate it. With the advent of enhanced security, what was once an architectural design innovation is now a struggle if you have to change planes—much less, airlines–or to find any amenities if you have to layover.

When Innovation Outlives Itself

In the case of the sports stadiums, when they began to show their age and fell behind the amenities offered at newer sports stadiums, the voters and the Kansas City sports teams decided to invest more than $500 million and update. But they stayed true to the original design innovation breakthrough concept.

Kansas City International Airport, however, faces a more difficult decision. Many Kansas City locals still love it, but it has too many buildings (and too many gates), an increasingly outmoded security system for passengers and baggage, significant environmental issues, and a challenge to offer the conveniences out-of-town flyers expect.

What KCI does have is the visionaries who built it in the first place being willing to call for another architectural design innovation, saying, “Do something different.”

At a roundtable discussion on KCI, Past, Present and Future, Bob Berkebile lead designer for KCI, and Hanan Kivett, nephew of Clarence Kivett and a former architect with Kivett and Myers during the construction of KCI, both said it was time for the city to move on.

Berkebile challenged the architects of the city to come up with something even better, even more innovative, “It’s a new opportunity to celebrate Kansas City.”

Looking Ahead for Another Innovation Breakthrough

That is likely the mark of a true innovator, someone who does not live in the past, but recognizes when it is necessary to search for the next defining innovation. – Barrett Sydnor


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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your customer service in a smart way without seeming as if you’re micro-managing the customer experience.

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Plenty of people have created lists of desert island discs, but this is different. Suppose you’re stuck on a desert island with just enough supplies to sustain your existence, PLUS a phone, a charger, a strong mobile signal, and your favorite Twitter app that will only let you follow 10 tweeters.

I know, this is a pretty wacked-out desert island scenario, but stick with me.

Now that you can only have 10 people to follow on Twitter, who would be your dessert island tweeters? Who has demonstrated in the past that they’re so intriguing to follow on Twitter they warrant a precious space on your list? Or who, based on what they might be able to do for you, could earn a spot among your top 10 Twitter friends?

Choosing Desert Island Tweeters

For whatever reason, the question of a desert island tweeters list struck me the other night as I had Tweetdeck open and was looking to engage in some fun, creativity-inspiring conversations on Twitter.

I could imagine a whole variety of criteria to consider when choosing desert island tweeters:

  • A person who you can always depend on to tweet with you
  • Someone who always rewteets you?
  • Someone who has a lot of followers who might retweet you once in a while and would hopefully retweet your requests for help
  • Someone who is a “fan” of yours
  • The person who is ALWAYS cheerful and has an encouraging tweet to share
  • Somebody who shares Triberr tweets 24/7
  • Big brands that tweet links to press releases
  • People who tell you about how great they are and tweet photos of the incredible things they’re doing right now
  • Foursquare addicts
  • A non-responder who never has a tweet for you when you tweet them
  • The old friend you rarely hear from, but will pop up on Twitter when you least expect it
  • The person who you KNOW will be on Twitter daily, even if they’re not tweeting with YOU
  • An IRL friend who you also happen to know online
  • A famous person who shares his or her life
  • The social media rock star who has lots of links to new stuff, but not so much conversation
  • Only people who also follow you
  • Tweeters who tweet about topics of interest to you
  • The people who tweet ALL the time
  • The attractive person who frequently tweets pictures of him/herself
  • #FollowFriday devotees who recognize you every week
  • Someone who tweets old quote from guys who have been dead for thousands of years

The list of criteria could go on and on for who to follow on Twitter if you could only have your  top 10 Twitter friends as your desert island tweeters.

So who WOULD BE your desert island tweeters?

Do any of these criteria help you come up with your desert island tweeters? Are the other criteria you would use?

And maybe most importantly, if there are people you wouldn’t add to your desert island tweeter list because they do some of the things listed here, why do you put up with them on Twitter every day?

Oh, and if you want to share your list of desert island tweeters (or even your list of desert island discs), you’re more than welcome to do so in the comments section below! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Yesterday, I was at Kansas City’s Gem Theater in the historic 18th and Vine District to live tweet TEDx18thAndVine with streamed, time-shifted sessions from 2012 TEDGlobal in Edinburgh, Scotland.

At least that was the original plan for TEDx18thAndVine. Unfortunately, technical challenges at Kansas City’s Gem Theater and with the video server had the production team valiantly scrambling onstage and off to keep the crowd engaged, leading to a generous mix of TED Talk archive videos throughout TEDx18thAndVine. Nonetheless, the day was marked by enough intriguing content under the Radical Openness theme to leave one’s head swimming by the end of the day.

Nine mini-recaps from TEDx18thAndVine TED Talks:

Philosophical Espresso

Fast-talking, performing philosopher Jason Silva starred in a 2012 TEDGlobal Radical Openness theme video and then joined Chris Anderson onstage. Talking with Anderson, he described his rapid-fire musings as “Shots of Philosophical Espresso” and “Movie Trailers for Ideas.” Just one of the big thoughts from Jason Silva: “Awe makes things new again. And that’s ultimately the best drug in the world.”

“RADICAL OPENNESS” – for TEDGlobal 2012 by @Jason_Silva from Jason Silva on Vimeo.

Those Who Remember the Past Too Well Are Doomed to Not Understand the Future

Discussing our need to determine a course of action incorporating climate changes underway and those in the future, environmental policy influencer Vicki Arroyo reminded the audience we are entering uncharted territory, and we cannot use the past to plan. Or as Arroyo put it, “Stationarity is dead.”

Learning and Changing Priorities

Andreas Schleicher (Education Surveyor) discussed what sets apart those countries who are leading in educating their youth.  Three specific ideas from his 2012 TEDGlobal presentation that struck me were:

  • “Everyone says education is important. But how do you weigh that priority against others?” (You can ask this question about anything people think is important.)
  • How well kids can extrapolate from what they know to new situations is a measure of their change preparedness. (When facts change rapidly, this is a fundamental future learning skill.)
  • “Learning is not a place but an activity.” (A small sentence packing a big challenge to the educational system as we have known it for a century or more.)

Eye Contact vs. “i” contact

One of the previous TED Talks shown at TEDx18thAndVine was from the TED 2012 “Connected, but Alone?” presentation by Sherry Turkle. Her focus was how the constant availability of communication devices changes how we think and interact with others. There weren’t necessarily many supporting facts, but there were a variety of standout comments from Sherry Turkle:

  • “If we don’t teach our children to be alone, they’ll only know how to be lonely.”
  • “I share therefore I am.”
  • “We expect more from technology & less from each other. Technology appeals to us most where we are most vulnerable.”
  • Facebook and Twitter pages make it seem as if other people are listening to you.
  • People think the problem with conversations is that conversations happen in real time (you cannot control when they happen), and you cannot control and limit the interaction.  What matters most to people is to control their own attention for what they want.

Integration > Innovation

Jonathan Trent from NASA focused his TED talk on the OMEGA project that seeks to grow algae in the ocean to create new liquid biofuel. His wrap-up comments on the OMEGA project and success factors for the future came right out of our Brainzooming innovation work:

Suffice it to say the perspectives Jonathan Trent shared about making change happen were right on target.

The Earth Is Rounder than We Think

Globalization thinker Pankaj Ghemawat shared a variety of statistics form his book World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve It (affiliate link) to support his point of view that the spread of globalization is many times less than the public believes. Pankaj Ghemawat has a word to describe the big messaging behind the earth being flat (affiliate link) and the pervasiveness of globalization: Globaloney. He suggests globaloney is a result of a dearth of data, peer pressure to see the world as one, and what he calls, “technotransis,” or an inability to NOT be sucked up into the expectation that technology will be all-pervasive and solve the world’s ills.

Step Up and Step Back

At day’s end, percussive guitarists Usman Riaz (the young gun) and legendary guitarist Preston Reed (affiliate link) collaborated on a striking, first-time guitar duet. Afterward, TED host Chris Anderson asked them to do something more, acknowledging they may not have prepared anything by saying, “We just want to see another 30 or 40 seconds, and if it goes horribly wrong, it’s fine.”

Sure, go for it in front of a global audience. The two guitarists talked briefly and launched into another number, playing out a great lesson if you’re ever asked to improv with someone else: let the junior person shine (Riaz played lead) and the more experienced individual support, providing background and structure (Reed was more “percussive” than “guitarist”). The natural tendency might be to have a more junior person take a step back, but their collaboration showcased Usman Riaz, while making it apparent that Preston Reed was the underpinning to their guitar collaboration.

Words to Live By

“If you want to make something you love (i.e., TED stage time) better, give it away.” – Chris Anderson

2012 TEDGlobal Wrap Up

As I tell anyone who asks, watching a streamed TED event is different than watching popular TED Talks from the TED website. When looking at individual videos, you’d think every TED Talk is fantastic. When you watch a whole array of them as they’re delivered, your takeaway is that there are boring and ho-hum TED Talks, too.

You also take away, as I did during yesterday’s 2012 TEDGlobal Session 6: Misbehaving Beautifully that it is good to experience people on the fringes, but you need to not confuse yourself by thinking they represent the mainstream. Radical Openness is fantastic, but sometimes Radical Wariness is called for in equal doses! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I spent two days last week with a business conference focus, attending two Kansas City events: The iKC Innovation Conference on Wednesday and the Kansas City Digital Storytelling Forum on Thursday. The keynote presenters at both business conferences were worth the price of admission (Michael Raynor (affiliate link) at iKC and Frank Rose (affiliate link) at the Digital Storytelling Forum), which was great because the panel discussions at each business conference were less successful. While that is disappointing, it is not shocking. Weak panel discussion sessions are more frequent at a business conference than free logoed pens.

7 Ideas for Event Planners to Make Panel Discussions Better

What can an event planner do to make a business conference panel discussion a stronger part of the audience experience? Here are seven ideas an event planner and a panel moderator should consider when deciding to include a panel discussion in a business conference:

1. A bad solo presenter isn’t necessarily going to be a compelling panel discussion member

There seems to be a rampant belief among event planners that a bad solo presenter will suddenly be great when placed in a panel discussion. That is simply not true. If someone has a good personality, enthusiasm for a topic, and is engaging BUT simply does not present well individually, a panel discussion slot can be the answer. If the person has a bland personality, little energy, and is not engaging when they interact, however, an event planner needs to forget about a panel discussion slot fixing the problem.

2. An event sponsor’s employees won’t necessarily be compelling panel discussion members either

It is easy for an event planner to offer discussion panel slots to sponsors’ employees as part of a sponsorship package. But if an event planner is serious about great content, then the sponsor’s employees need to be strong panelists to earn an onstage role. Boring panelists from a major sponsor fill up space, but will not reflect well on the sponsor or the event planner.

3. A panel moderator should watch Charlie Rose, Larry King, and The McLaughlin Group beforehand

The panel moderator has the job of starting the conversation, creating a compelling flow, making connections, and tying topics together. These hosts all handle(d) group interactions in different ways, but each is worth watching and learning from for any new panel moderator.

4. The panel moderator should talk with panelists individually

While pre-session group calls with panels are fine for getting to know each other, the panel moderator should talk to each panelist individually as well. One-on-one interviews are used to identify individual topics specific to each person so there’s fresh content for panelists to react to when the panel is live onstage.

5. Discuss topics, not questions, with panel members ahead of time

It’s great to have panelists well-versed on the subject matter. But it doesn’t make for an interesting panel discussion when panelists have all the questions upfront to rehearse answers. When that happens, you have both a bad presentation (because the remarks are all prepared) and a bad panel (because interaction evaporates).

6. Identify areas of healthy disagreement to explore during the panel discussion

When everyone on a panel agrees, it’s boring. Without different perspectives, there’s no basis for healthy (and interesting) interaction. It’s up to the organizer to assemble a panel that represents differing perspectives and experience. It’s up to the moderator to identify areas where panel members can exchange differing perspectives and then challenge them to do so.

7. Not everyone has to answer every question

The point of a panel isn’t to take a 45-minute chunk of conference time and divide it evenly with each panelist getting equal time. Yet, so many panel sessions try to have equal participation to the detriment of the overall session. Let panelists address questions that make the most sense for them (even if it’s not all equal) and interact with each other. It may seem less orderly to the event planner, but it will definitely provide a more compelling audience experience.

Do you enjoy panel discussions at business conferences?

Granted, I’ve taken a pretty harsh view of panel discussions here, but there are some redeeming qualities and compelling content that can emerge. What  do you enjoy or not enjoy about business conference panel discussions? – Mike Brown

 

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If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Emailus at info@brainzooming.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

 

                            (Affiliate Link)

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The Wall Street Journal featured a review this past Saturday of “Wait: The Art and Science of Delay” by Frank Partnoy (affiliate link) by Christopher B. Chabris. The review highlights Frank Partnoy’s challenge to those espousing the need to act right away, lest opportunities be forever lost and his support for the waiting game strategy in both business and personal lives. The question of using the waiting game strategy is something we have talked about here on Brainzooming before as “strategic patience.”

Affiliate Link

In “Wait,” Frank Partnoy offers examples of the waiting game strategy paying off in a variety of situations. These include a baseball batter who can wait on getting the right pitch to 3M waiting twelve years between the discovery of a low-stick adhesive and the introduction of the Post-it Notes the adhesive made reality.

As with many books, Christopher B. Chabris points out in his review that Frank Partnoy offers examples, but no answers to know when and how long to wait because “there is no formula for getting the right answer.”

I don’t necessarily have a formula either.

But as one who likes to use the waiting game strategy, thinking back through lessons from both my business and personal lives suggested six characteristics of situations where a waiting game strategy can work and two critical success factors for one being more successful.

Six Characteristics where a Waiting Game Strategy Can Work

Thinking about situations where you are considering waiting over acting, you’re likely to find a waiting game being successful if these six characteristics are in place:

1. Waiting is consistent with a longer-term strategy you have in place

This implies a pre-determined reason for waiting that was baked into your initial strategy.

2. Your longer-term strategy is flexible and can accommodate several situations or time frames

When your strategy could apply to a variety of different market and organizational scenarios, waiting for the best of these is a viable approach.

3. Your opportunity and risk exposure is so small that you are willing and able to sustain the window of opportunity going away completely

This is the classic negotiation technique. If you are in a waiting game, you have to be able to walk away from the deal (or have it walk away from you) and still be okay.

4. You are still learning or receiving benefits while waiting that improve your ability to respond

This reflects the advantage played out by fast followers. Rather than jumping in first and learning by trial and error, fast followers watch the leader and go to school on their mistakes before launching a similar effort.

5. You are able to move forward with actions supporting a definitive path to be pursued later

If you’re able to make progress while keeping your strategic options open, that’s a real benefit.

6. Future options are not being shut down (and in fact be expanding) with the passage of time

As long as you’re in the position of being able to decide your course of action (as opposed to having inaction making decisions for you), waiting can still make sense.

Two Critical Success Factors for Making the Waiting Game Strategy Work

To better ensure you do not miss too many opportunities while you are content to wait, make sure you:

1. Don’t let the opportunity you are waiting on be pushed out of sight, out of mind

You need listening posts to monitor market and competitive actions relative to the opportunity you are waiting on to make sure you actually pull the trigger at the latest and best possible time.

2. Have individuals in your close circle that will instigate for action and keep forcing the issue

You want to make sure that even during a period of strategic patience you have people in your organization who are advocates for taking action. As much as you may be fine waiting for things to play out over an extended period of time, you want someone pushing action to keep you honest.

Don’t wait to share what you think!

What are your thoughts on this idea of strategic patience, a waiting game strategy, and the areas Frank Partnoy is addressing? If you’re someone who pursues it, how do you make it work for you? If, instead, you are a person of immediate action, what works best about that approach for you?

We’re waiting to hear what you have to say! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

 

      (Affiliate Link)

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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