Marketing | The Brainzooming Group - Part 26 – page 26
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Most marketers would agree that having and demonstrating they know the customer well is a key to great customer service. Nevertheless, it is possible to go overboard when trying to know the customer well. The signs I found in a Western Kansas Days Inn demonstrate  that knowledge can also be a little disconcerting when it’s less about providing great customer service and appears to be more about micro-managing the customer experience.

Don’t Clean

For instance, not sure I wanted to know—via this sign on the table by the television—that the customer experience of the previous occupants of my room had possibly involved cleaning game or boarding hunting dogs where I was walking around barefoot.

Do Clean

On the other hand, I found it interesting that those same bird-shooting, dog-keeping occupants were significant consumers of beauty aids that must be removed with a special cloth.

Did You Clean Enough?

Finally though, I did appreciate that while the hotel management was going to charge me if I stole any of the linens, that they were going to check daily to make sure that I was following good hygiene practices.

How do you want to see a brand managing your customer experience?

How do you react when it feels as if a brand is micro-managing the customer experience? Do you appreciate the deep knowledge they have about you and does it translate into great customer service? Or would you prefer the brand simply back off and give you some room? – Barrett Sydnor

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your customer service in a smart way without seeming as if you’re micro-managing the customer experience.

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0

The Proliferation of Free Speech Expectations

I received an email the other day asking me to speak for a private organization because it would be really good for its audience to hear what I had to say. To APPLY to speak, I was asked to complete a multi-page form that made it clear speakers would not be paid and had better not promote any product or service during the “free speech.”

Wow.

Wow, but not unusual.

With the great free online content explosion the past few years, there’s a similar expectation that any content, including content delivered live to an organization that is being paid to host the event where the content is being delivered, should be free speech.

Remember “gunga galunga” from Caddyshack? It’s kind of like that; there will be no money, but MAYBE for your effort you’ll receive total consciousness on your deathbed. So you’ll have that going for you.

What is Fair Trade Speech?

As someone who has both done some free speaking AND asked others to speak for free, here’s an alternative, and potentially much more successful strategy, for event organizers to use:

Realize that there is value to content, even if you don’t think you have the dollars to pay for it. In those cases, be creative so you can deliver commensurate value to the speaker you’re trying to attract.

The key to implementing this fair trade speech strategy successfully is for an event organizer to understand what resources you have that might be valuable to the speakers you’re trying to attract for “free speech.”

A Fair Trade Speech Strategy Instead of Free Speech

This list is by no means exhaustive, but from speaking myself and working to book speakers, here is a list of 18 resources that could be valuable for speakers:

Website & Publication-Based

  • Include links to the speaker’s website
  • Promote the their business or whatever it sells
  • Promote/feature the speaker’s content (book, blog, etc.)
  • Incorporate logos for the their company

Networking

  • Arrange for interaction opportunities with the speaker and target attendees (whether meetings, meals, or even additional sessions)
  • Ensure introductions to attendees the speaker wants to meet
  • Provide a list of attendees for the event

Exposure & Audience Building

  • Demonstrate you are investing in a real marketing effort to build attendance for the event
  • Host a pre- or post-webinar to provide more exposure
  • If it’s a multi-presentation event, mention the speaker’s session and company in general sessions
  • Allow them to share a promo spot or advertisement for their business online or in-person
  • Handle a pre- or post-event email to attendees from the speaker
  • Video and edit the presentation they deliver at your event for their promotional use
  • Offer to do recommendations for the speaker on LinkedIn or on video

Other Financial Offsets

  • Offer to handle administrative details (i.e., filling out registration and other forms, making travel arrangements, etc.)
  • Buy the speaker’s content to give to attendees
  • Offer to produce a speaker’s handouts / promotional materials for the event
  • Provide one or more free or reduced-cost admissions for their use with clients
  • Pay for Travel and Lodging
  • Use the talents and resources within your organization to do something for the presenter (i.e. one recent conference I attended updated a speaker’s website as a trade-out)

As I said, this list of fair trade speech ideas isn’t exhaustive. But please don’t take the omission of coffee mugs, pens, and bulky and liquid gift items when the presenter is flying as accidental omissions. They aren’t. Trust me.

Give a Fair Trade Speech Strategy a Try

Go to a speaker you’re trying to sway to with a free speech (or drastically reduced speaking fee) plea and use this list (along with the background about the worthiness of your cause) to see how a fair trade speech strategy works.

I guarantee you’ll have better success with a fair trade speech strategy than sending them an application and a threat about self-promotion.

Trust me.  – Mike Brown

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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4

Friend and author Jim Joseph recently led a webinar on his book “The Experience Effect for Small Business” (affiliate link). During the question and answer segment, someone asked about how much a business should “spend” on brand building. I quickly tweeted:

“How much to spend on your brand? Zero. Instead, INVEST in brand elements that generate ROI.”

The tweet prompted Margie Clayman, Director of Client Development at Clayman Advertising, to ask what I meant exactly with my tweet. Her question prompted a great back and forth Twitter exchange about marketing investment vs. spending. At the conclusion, I promised a follow-up blog post on marketing investment to respond more completely to Margie’s initial question.

Don’t Spend Anything on Brand Building?

Back in the corporate business-to-business world, when trying to increase our organization’s emphasis on building a brand in all forms (service quality, awareness building, customer service, sponsorship marketing, etc.), we were seeking significantly more resources for activities we believed would benefit the company.

But instead of talking about our request for more resources as “spending,” we made ourselves talk about our marketing INVESTMENT strategy for brand building.

Why the distinction?

In our business-to-business organization, SPENDING implied we simply wanted more dollars because we were marketers, and marketers SPEND money on frivolous, nice looking things that don’t matter. INVESTING, on the other hand, was what the organization did to secure equipment, facilities, and everything else perceived to be vital to performing the services we sold.

Banning use of the word “spend” in favor of “marketing investment” created five clear benefits. Some of the benefits were organizational. Others simply made us be better marketers.

Investment both implies and forces you to think about your strategy in a new way:

1. A marketing investment implies an underlying business objective

You can spend money on anything. You invest in assets expected to generate a positive return and address important business objectives. Displaying a marketing investment attitude makes you ground brand building programs in real business objectives, not just creating new advertisements because the old ones are boring to the marketing department.

2. Talking about return on investment (ROI) adds credibility and makes building a brand seem (and become) less squishy

Making yourself discuss a program with all the elements incorporated in an ROI calculation makes a marketer take on a whole business perspective and not that of someone who simply designs advertising or tweets for a living. You’ll directly benefit as you help the organization learn that marketing and branding don’t simply involve logos, but instead focuses on the entire experience customers (and prospects) have with your organization.

3. Talking about marketing investments will get Marketing into early conversations with Finance

One of the most challenging business relationships for a marketer focused on building a brand is with the finance function in your organization. When you start building a brand thinking about your marketing investment levels and ROI, you’re going to need to reach out to Finance to ensure you are in sync. That outreach will get challenging conversations started sooner than later, which will pay tremendous dividends financially and organizationally.

4. An investment attitude will force you to make sure you’re doing enough to meet your return objective

When you put yourself on the hook to forecast a return associated with your marketing investment strategy, it causes you to look at your plans and make sure you are planning enough of the right types of strategic actions to generate necessary returns. Far better to consider those strategic actions upfront than when your program is falling short of goal half-way through implementation.

5. Making marketing investments forces you to ensure you have measures and listening posts in place to capture necessary ROI metrics

Considering upfront what it will take to calculate an ROI from your marketing investment strategy causes you to evaluate whether you have the measures and listening posts in place to measure the positive returns you expect to generate from building a brand. If you were simply “spending,” you might find yourself at the end of a marketing program knowing how many dollars went out, but with insufficient metrics to demonstrate any returns.

The Final Tweet on Marketing Investment and Building a Brand

I thought Margie Clayman’s final tweet was a perfect summary to our conversation:

Investment really does say you’re putting something into your brand AND expecting something back for it.

So what words do you use (and not use) relative to your brand building efforts?  – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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6

You hear people ask, “Why does time fly so much faster than it used to?”  It feels like time is running past so quickly. Holidays and major life events seem as if they arrive right on top of each other. Yet as fast as it seems time flies, some recent events (i.e. meeting IRL with Woody Bendle for #Ideachat last month and again this past weekend) seem as if they happened a year ago.

Why does time fly so much faster in your estimation?

Considering this question, I came up with three possible ideas:

1. Information Overload

There is so much more information that comes at us now, we’re processing what used to be a year’s worth of information in a relatively short time One study from a few years ago said information was coming at us 5 times faster than 20 years before. Right now, with the further proliferation of social media participation, the five times faster figure seems low. Regardless, what used to be a year’s worth of information hits you so much faster – in just a couple of months now. This phenomenon has to be a big factor in disorienting our perception of time passing.

2. Seasonal Marketing Is Out of Whack

To get in front of the message glut and to try and cut through the message clutter, marketers (especially retailers) begin seasonal messaging so much earlier than the calendar suggests. Retailers time shift the entire year. The Christmas retail season goes from July to December 26 (contrast that with a liturgical view of the Christmas season which runs from the evening of December 24 to early January). The Halloween retail season starts in early September and is on closeout before October 31. Back-to-school seems to overlap with “just barely leaving” school. The result is it feels like time is running out and nearly completely disassociated from what the calendar says.

3. The Challenge in Scheduling Meetings

Since in so many organizations there are fewer people to do more work than there used to be, there is a challenge in scheduling meetings and other events. As a result, you wind up scheduling meetings far in advance. On a routine, longer-term project for us, it is common to be scheduling meetings three months in advance. When it comes to a bigger event, the scheduling window is even longer. When you are operating like that, the challenge in scheduling meetings forces you to be thinking many months ahead and acting as if the future is now.

What to do?

If you buy those three reasons for why time seems to fly by so quickly, you can try to manage your information intake as much as you can and do your best to maintain a perspective and a schedule more firmly rooted in the actual calendar than in seasonal marketing messages.

Will this help? What do you think? – Mike Brown

 

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Challenged at finding the time to think about strategy? If you CAN find the time, do you need to get your strategy work done so quickly it’s not very effective? If that sounds like you,  The Brainzooming Group is your perfect answer. Our name says it all: we’ll get your brain thinking strategically so quickly, it will feel like more than time is zooming. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call 816-509-5320 for a free consultation on how to get started.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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6

Dilbert.com

When I run a Dilbert comic strip, it is because there is some core idea or concept within the comic strip that really hits home with a theme we cover on the Brainzooming blog. This Dilbert comic strip’s subject is a little bit different in that it covers something that has not been covered directly here, but is on my mind frequently. The question is how to let people know about what The Brainzooming Group can do and the value we provide clients without violating my own sense that one should never engage in bragging?

If you spend any amount of time listening in social networks, it seems that online bragging  is rampant. If you spend TOO MUCH time listening in social networks, it can make you believe that you have to jump into the same level of online bragging to keep up.

I have had many days where the temptation is to follow Dilbert’s perspective, change our messaging direction here and in other social media channels, and engage in the same online bragging game that plays out on social networks every day:

  • Crowing about vaguely detailed client wins
  • Touting significant projects that might not really be all that significant
  • Bragging about everything else happening that can be fabricated into sounding like the most important things ever to happen in business.

However, every time it seems like trying to change our messaging direction is appropriate, there is a signal from somewhere that bragging is not the right thing to do. This one came, interestingly enough, via Twitter this weekend.

What can I say, other than Proverbs trumps Dilbert and online bragging every day of the week! We’ll stay focused on accomplishing stuff, one instance of which we’ll share, with great humility, tomorrow. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

Amid all the fervor about content marketing and the importance of sharing frequent, compelling content about your brand, there could be a real problem.

Your may be dealing with challenging content. It could even be inaccessible to parts of your intended audience. Maybe your content is:

  • Overly technical
  • Meaningful to only a small audience
  • Difficult to understand or interpret
  • Boring
  • Obscure

Maybe you have challenging content for some other reason entirely. If you are saddled with the responsibility for building an audience and making challenging content accessible, what can you do? Here is an idea if you’re doing content marketing in this type of situation.

Making Challenging Content Accessible

My friend Emma Alvarez Gibson, who is perhaps the biggest Nick Cave fan in the world, has been talking about Nick Cave on Twitter and Facebook as long as I have known her. In an effort to discover shared connections with an online friend, I’d even sampled Nick Cave music on iTunes and eMusic several times. For me, Nick Cave’s music could be considered eclectic and challenging content. The songs were generally way too slow for my liking; I didn’t “get” his music and certainly didn’t download any of his songs.

Then recently, I was direct messaging with Emma and complaining about some things going on that day. Emma said she’d gone through some similar situations and songs from a couple of Nick Cave (Grinderman) albums had been helpful in getting her through it all.

With that, Emma stepped through a masterful plan to make Nick Cave’s music accessible to me. The steps are worth reviewing because they’d be appropriate for any organization trying to make its own content more accessible to its audience:

1. Build a personal connection

Beyond connecting my current situation to one where Nick Cave’s music had helped her, Emma had shared stories previously about getting to interview the drummer from the Bad Seeds. Her connection made me more intrigued to discover what she enjoyed about the music.

2. Introduce relevant context

When Emma shared links with Nick Cave song recommendations, she offered background information about the songs, the characters, and what the lyrics mean. Now, I had some elements to listen for when checking out the songs.

3. Select a relevant subset of content

Rather than trying to get me to go through the whole Nick Cave catalog, Emma recommended songs from only a couple of Nick Cave records. This provided a pool of content more likely to click with me.

4. Suggest an appropriate and easy starting point

Within the subset of Nick Cave songs Emma recommended, she identified several songs as a good place to start listening. With her input, I created a download list starting with her recommended songs. I liked the very first song I listened to on the list.

5. Check back to gauge reactions

Since I started listening to the recommended songs, Emma has checked back several times to see my reactions and offer suggestions for edgier content to listen to next. Here, she made sure I didn’t get frustrated or disaffected and stop listening.

The Result? A New Nick Cave Fan

Emma’s efforts turned me into a Nick Cave fan. I can’t even begin to tell you how many times I’ve listened to the song “More News from Nowhere,” one of starter songs Emma suggested. Between the hook in “More News from Nowhere” and Cave’s delivery, I’m definitely a fan!

If you are involved with content marketing and making challenging content accessible for a brand, what steps do you take to build an audience? In case you’re struggling with it, I’d recommend the five-step approach Emma Alvarez Gibson took to turn me into a new Nick Cave fan. You’ll see results! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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17

This is the final installment of creative ideas from the June 2012 issue of Fast Company featuring its list of The 100 Most Creative People in Business 2012. These final thirty-six creative storytelling and creative process tips, as with the other from earlier ones, were all inspired by individual profiles on on the Fast Company 100 Most Creative People in Business list.

I hope this slightly different take on The Most Creative People in Business list profiles has been helpful now and in the future. For me personally, I pulled away perhaps five big idea possibilities for The Brainzooming Group. They tied specifically to business development and user experience ideas. Quite frankly, I’d hoped for a more, but the shortfall may be because of the abbreviated nature of the profiles Fast Company features on each person listed.

Now that our coverage on the creative people list wraps with these thirty-six creative storytelling and creative process tips, I guess it’s up to all of us now to get on with our creative work to try and make the list in 2013!

Creative Storytelling

What’s your story? Write your story. Then share it. Over and over.  Bradford Shellhammer – Cofounder, Chief Creative Officer, Fab.com (#50)

Make stories. Tie together important touch points and create stories from them.  – Steve Porter – Viral Video Producer (#60)

When you develop your own material you can create it in the way you want, with the people you admire, and end up with creative output that works for you.  Aziz Ansari – Comedian, Actor, “Parks and Rec” (#87)

Curation isn’t exclusively selection. It’s about playing out a perspective that connects to the audience.  Maria Popova – Editor, Brainpickings.org (#51)

In conveying information (whether infographics or not), start with analysis, followed by determining the size and breadth of the insights, and finish with making it accessible.  Eddie Opara – Partner, Pentagram (#52)

Introduce new content to your audience every day wrapped in great creative storytelling with strong characters, plot twists, surprising resolutions and a hint at what happens next.  Andrew Wilson – Executive Vice President, EA Sports (#40)

In what ways does every piece of new content you create build on your amazing story?  – Jeremy Heimans – Founder, Purpose (#11)

Dress the creative part. It’s your obligation to wear jeans if it allows others to see you in the proper light.  Cyrus Massoumi – Cofounder, ZocDoc (#57)

Creative Process Tips

It’s harder to sustain your creativity than it is to work to get your creative break. Focus on only doing what counts to make or keep your creative break. Don’t let yourself become distracted.  Ceelo Green – Entertainer (#5)

You can’t sit still and expect ideas will just pop out of your head. Go do something!  Elvis Chau – Executive Creative Director, JWT Shanghai (#84)

How much nonsense stuff are you doing? Is it good nonsense (that spurs creativity) or bad nonsense (it saps creativity)?  Andrew Yang – Founder, Venture for America (#27)

If you’re the creative force in your organization can you afford to personally “touch” everything your organization produces? Can you afford not to?  Pamela Love – Founder, Pamela Lover N.Y.C. (#93)

Make every square inch of your work space creative and fill it with people who have both the creative and technical talents to create through your entire process.  Tony Haile – CEO, Chartbeat (#64)

Hold a weekly “Inspiration Friday,” event to share anything that’s been a creative inspiration in the past 7 days.  Neil Blumenthal – Confounder, Warby Parker (#92)

Try a “walking meeting” to talk and walk and solve.  Andrew Hsu – Founder, Airy Labs (#68)

Spit out as many ideas as fast as you can to get them out and captured. Then think about the connections and context among them.  Greg Gunn – Entrepreneur in Residence, City Light Central (#85)

Take an experimental view and put together unconnected things to find the strategic connectionsMasashi Kawamura – Cofounder, Creative Director, Party (#47)

When you’re in a partnership, one person’s passion for an idea or approach trumps the other’s reticence.  Anand Rajaraman & Venky Harinarayan – Coheads, Walmart Labs (#53)

When you’re creating a fantasy world, there still should be a solid internal logic to it.  – Thomas Tull – Founder, Chairman, CEO, Legendary Entertainment (#55)

Share a starting idea or piece of creative work with the crowd, and let the crowd edit, change, or rank it to create the final version.  Roy Price – Director, Amazon Studios (#15)

Invest more time in the visualization of whatever you do or create.  – Miriah Meyer- Computer Scientist, University of Utah (#24)

Every creative effort has to incorporate time to consider its aesthetics.  Janet Iwasa – Molecular Animator, Harvard University (#25)

If you have different strategic efforts focused on the same creative goal that are difficult to compare, come up with a new success metric that works for both.  Stefan Olander – VP, Digital Sport, Nike (#7)

If you’re addressing multiple audiences and can’t play creative favorites among them, create a prototypical audience member who is both everyone and no one at the same time.  Kibwe Tavares – Cofounder, Factor Fifteen (#91)

Turn teaching into an experience of a class creating something together.  Michael Karnjanaprakorn – Founder, Skillshare (#18)

When education is the goal, contact and interaction is a fundamental aspect of the process.  – Anka Mulder – President, OpenCourseWare Consortium (#19)

If you don’t want to seem abrupt to your audience, signal what you’re planning to do before you do it.  Leila Takayama – Research Scientist, Willow Garage (#30)

When signaling change, physically destroy a representation of the attitudes that are getting in the way (i.e., put negative culture characteristics on beer bottles and smash them).  – Jeff Charney – CMO, Progressive Insurance (#35)

Audiences are more accepting of new content being delivered without as much polish, allowing you more room for trial, error, and learning.  T.J. Miller – Actor, Comedian (#58)

Personal relevancy and engagement drive not only why people open things online, but also why people want to interact with anything.  Ron J. Williams – CEO, Cofounder, Knodes (#62)

Invest more of your creative time and energy on creating incredible transitions in your work.  Danny Trinh – Designer, Path (#66)

Maybe literacy in the Arab world is bad because of bad typefaces. Great reminder to keep asking, “Why else could this be happening?” until you get to very surprising answers.  Nadine Chahine – Type Designer, Linotype and Monotype Imaging (#69)

When thinking about creative executions for mobile applications, strip things down to their simplest, tiniest forms.  Ethan Marcotte – Freelance Web Designed (#75)

When someone’s pushed to the breaking point in a process you discover what they REALLY believe vs. what they’re doing simply it seems like the right thing to do.  Carrie Brownstein – Writer, Actor, Portlandia (#95)

If there’s a problem with even one part of your creative output, there’s a problem with all of your creative output.  Robin Guenther – Principal, Perkins + Will (#61)

When there’s a problem, look at the things that are still working and rewind them until everything seems to function in an expected way. Then restart.  Nina Tandon – Research Scientist, Columbia University (#26)  – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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