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Magic happens through:

  • Creativity

  • Misdirection

  • Showmanship

  • Engaging storytelling

  • Illusion

Magic also happens through:

  • Discipline

  • Planning

  • Rehearsal

  • Process

  • Repetition

Magic happens through exploring big ideas with a whole brain approach!

When you do that well, it’s magic!!!Mike Brown

Taking the NO Out of InNOvationFor a magical creativity boost this holiday season, download the free Brainzooming ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” as a gift for your creative perspective!

If you’d like to have magic happen with your business strategy, contact The Brainzooming Group. We love using our whole-Brainzooming strategy planning process to catalyze innovative success and help your organization win big!  Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can create strategic magic for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

Following up yesterday’s post on the creativity boost working from memory can provide, winning results can also unveil themselves when you break away from what appears to be strategic common sense to pursue and implement an unconventional strategy.

The working from memory post got me thinking about a similar high school experience at a regional math competition. Fellow students Jeff Bernasky, close friend Dale Romme, and I were entered in a timed, competitive segment called, “Calculations with Calculators.”

I don’t frankly remember why, but none of us actually had a working calculator when it came time for the competition. As a result, we devised an alternative strategy. We’d each scan through the test and work only the easiest math problems – the ones which clearly didn’t require a calculator to solve.

When we implemented our strategy, it allowed us to answer more questions than any of the other student teams, since one can surmise, they were solving the equations sequentially using calculators every step of the way.

We won the competition in our sophomore year. And when we entered the competition the next two years, guess what? Yep, we didn’t use calculators and earned the threepeat!

Are you facing similar instances where employing the completely natural strategy makes sense but doesn’t yield the same winning results as an unconventional strategy could? You’ll never know what the possibilities are until you give the unconventional strategy a try! – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement.  To learn how we can structure a strategy to keep you ahead of your customers, email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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3

Looking for a dramatic creativity boost when you’re in the midst of editing a document for the umpteenth time? Try working from memory.

Instead of tweaking yet another iteration of what has become a too-familiar blur of words, force yourself to update parts of the document without consulting the most recent version you’ve been staring at for too long anyway.

Surprised a guy who loves the efficiency of working from pre-existing content would recommend working from memory? Don’t be!

I had to work from memory recently while traveling, and the document I needed to update wasn’t easily accessible. Much to my creative delight, because of all the time I’d spent with the original content, working from memory to recreate several strategic concepts spurred a fresh creative approach. The better results were much better (in hardly more time) than if I had tweaked the latest version in a fairly incremental fashion.

It’s the holidays. It’s the time for great holiday memories. So try putting your memory to work this holiday season and see what type of new creativity boost you’ll receive as a gift!  – Mike Brown

For an additional creativity boost this holiday season, download the free Brainzooming ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” as a gift for your creative perspective! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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6

What are wiggle words?

  • Draft

  • Interim

  • Current Version

  • High-Level

  • Rough

  • Illustrative

  • Mock-up

  • Prototype

  • Simulation

  • Rough Draft

  • Possible

  • Top-line

  • Peek

  • Early Look

  • Preview

  • Highlights

  • Working Draft

  • Summary

  • Advanced Copy

  • Potential

These are all “wiggle words.”

They’re words which get used when what you’re supposed to have delivered isn’t quite there yet. That may be intentional, i.e. you really are providing an early peek in advance of a deadline, or it may mean you’ve fallen short of the agreed to timing or content expectations.

In either case, “wiggle words” can be very powerful, creating important positive or negative results. It’s all in how you use them strategically relative to the expectations you’re facing. So be smart, and be careful. And use them prudently. – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you. Mike Brown

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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1

A creative block can happen when you’re handed a project or report and asked to work within a structure someone else has designed. Often when you haven’t helped create the project structure, it can lead to spending more time trying to figure out the format than making progress toward the effort’s objective, making it seem like a creative block.

When you find yourself facing a creative block in this type of situation, remember:

  • Don’t let arbitrary structures stop you from doing what makes sense.
  • Don’t let thinking you can’t get everything done stop you from doing something.
  • Don’t let a poorly conceived format stand in the way of you (or others) being able to see the progress you’re making.
  • Don’t let a situation spiral into over-complication when stopping and beginning anew would be much simpler.
  • Don’t let overly aggressive expectations preclude you from negotiating for a humbler objective which delivers a disproportionately large impact.

If you can employ these admonitions, you’ll minimize the possibility of a creative block, save yourself huge frustrations and create much better results. – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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10

Feel like it’s tough to generate consistent social media content to share through your outlets?

Or maybe at times it seems as if you have a whole bunch of social media content lined up? In either situation, here’s my best strategic advice: Space out sharing the content you have!

  • Content-SpreadIf you get a really good run at writing blog posts, don’t publish the two or three blog posts you’ve written at one time or even in one day. Hold the additional one(s) for a time when you need something fresh.
  • If you have a bunch of pictures from an event, don’t upload them all at once. Share a few at a time over a week.
  • Have an extra long blog post in the hopper? Divide it into two or three shorter blog posts and create a series that fills up a whole week. You can use the same strategy with long videos as well by editing them into multiple, shorter segments.

Taking this social media strategy advice means you can extend your content, give your readers something more manageable to digest, and save yourself some content creation time to focus on other social media listening and participation opportunities, or heck, even to live your life! – Mike Brown

 

“How strong is my organization’s social media strategy?”

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question.

Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy.”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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3

A question at my recent social media strategy for non-profits training presentation at the Topeka Community Foundation was what steps one, two, and three should be when just starting developing a social media strategy. Interestingly, the person asking the question speculated on the answer and was absolutely correct:

  • Start by making sure your home base, your own website, is fantastic before you focus on establishing cool outposts on popular social networks where your target audience spends time.

This idea about fixing up your home was highlighted in the recent post on similarities in dating advice and social media strategy. You want to make sure you spruce up your home so that as a relationship which started someplace else advances, you have an attractive, welcoming place to invite someone to get to know each other better.

There are some who say that with the prevalence of Facebook, an organization’s Facebook page will supersede (or even replace) its home page on the web.

Maybe.

But even still, while you may want to meet your target audience where they’re hanging out, a place like Facebook won’t let you share your full story.

It’s far better to have a much more compelling online option under your control where someone can learn about you, and importantly, derive more value from the relationship than they can when interacting with you on neutral ground.

If you buy that, what does it mean for your social media strategy?

1. Make sure your online home provides the richest experience possible, delivering valuable content and interactions for your target audience. That means it isn’t just a brochure or reads like the typical corporate b.s. Figure out what potential or current customers want to know about or do, and put it in place. If they want to conduct business without lots of extras, get core business functions up and running which are quick to load, perform well, and create a rich user experience.

2. Be present and participatory where your audience is today and extend invitations to your online home. Ask for permission to keep talking to them whether they’re interacting with you on Facebook, Twitter, or some other social network. Target securing an email address to open up the possibility for richer conversations on a schedule you’re more involved in establishing.

3. Once someone’s interested in your website, don’t spend all your time trying to get them to go to your Facebook page. Invest greater effort and website geography on providing a whole variety of ways to interact: a blog, distinct RSS feeds, sign-ups for newsletters, multi-media options (video, podcasts), etc.

It’s the holidays, so while you think about being home with the ones you love, give some time over to thinking about your online home and making it a great place for the customers (and potential customers) you love to want to return to in the future. – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we’ve developed  integrated social media strategy for other brands and can do the same for yours.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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