11

Talk about a great use of social media listening to engage customers! The evening before last week’s BMA Minnesota innovation training presentation on Taking the NO Out of Business InNOvation, I went to dinner at Crave in the Mall of America with good friends and Brainzooming blog readers Brian and Alison Wenck.

After parting ways with the Wencks, I walked into a store called Sox Appeal looking for orange socks to add to my collection. Lo and behold, they had multiple orange sock styles, and I bought 3 pairs of new orange socks.

Back at my hotel room later, I turned on Tweetdeck to catch up with happenings in the Twitter world. I tweeted about going to Mall of America and finding orange socks to give away at the next morning’s presentation.

In part, I mention brands in social media channels to see if they are listening and responding as part of their social media strategies. Not many responses come my way.

Within a very short time though, I had a reply from @MallOfAmerica wishing me well on the presentation. The tweet ended with “-lg,” which when I clicked on the @MallOfAmerica profile, told me Lisa Grimm (@lulugrimm) was handling the @MallOfAmerica account Wednesday night.

Lisa and I had a brief chat about Mall of America and its social media listening strategy. After bemoaning my four visits to MOA without getting to ride any rides, she invited me to stop by next time in town and definitely ride the rides! I invited Lisa to the presentation since she’d mentioned seeing info about it, but things were getting too crazy at work with the pending holiday season.

Granted, the Mall of America is a big operation, but think how smartly this brief personal encounter shows it is approaching its social media listening strategy. The Mall of America is:

  • Listening – Later in the evening (beyond typical business hours), they were listening when people were talking, not just when Mall of America was in full operating mode.
  • Reaching Out – I wasn’t looking to initiate a conversation with MOA since the orange socks were bought at a particular store. But because I mentioned the mall in the tweet, they took the opportunity to start a conversation.
  • Personalizing the Interaction – Even though it’s a business account, putting the tweeter’s initials on the tweet and the Twitter identities in the profile created both a business AND a personal connection. Although my haste caused me to take several times to get her name right, I’ve had a couple more conversations with Lisa on Twitter since then.
  • Inviting Future Engagement Online and IRL – The conversation about both the roller coasters and my interest in learning more about the Mall’s social media strategy led to the invite from Lisa to reach out to them next time I’m in town.

This is far and away the strongest social media listening and outreach integration I’ve experienced with any brand on Twitter. It’s a great standard for other organizations to emulate in social media listening strategy implementation! – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we’ve developed  integrated social media strategy for other brands and can do the same for yours.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

Typing up the results from a planning session the other day, I found myself going to just about any length possible to thwart my own progress. A wandering mind plus having Twitter on in the background naturally translates to more time wasting. In this case, it led to this list of Top 10 Time Wasters.

I’m sure you’ll recognize some of these. What time wasters do you wrestle with when you’re working, but you’re deadline seems very far off?

10. Lose stuff in your messy office, and then get really determined about taking time to find what you’ve lost.

9. Come up with a goofy #Top10TimeWasters Twitter hashtag and see if anyone plays along.

8. Spend time going through Gmail contacts to see if they’re out of date.

7. Check Twitter after every 23 words you type on the report you need to get done.

6. See if the mail has come 2 hours early with the check you’ve been waiting for.

5. Create a new seasonal personal Twitter avatar.

4. Go to the fridge and eat more Famous Amos vanilla cookies.

3. Offer to answer questions for anybody on Twitter, including performing extensive research on questions in areas where you have no expertise.

2. Refuse to settle for only 9 #Top10TimeWasters.

1. Use a business card to clean out the lint and crumbs from your computer keyboard. – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement.  To learn how we don’t waste your time when we work with you, email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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9

There’s a slide in my standard social media strategy presentation showing a young couple looking lovingly at one another. Okay, actually only the girl is looking lovingly. The boy’s face looks as if he’s brimming with ulterior motives!

The image is there to remind organizations considering social media that their strategies can’t resemble the teenage boy’s apparent dating strategy if they expect to build strong, lasting relationships.

The striking similarities between dating’s early stages and the first phases of implementing a successful social media strategy are a convenient way to gauge whether your organization’s social media strategy is likely be appropriate and successful.

With several Brainzooming presentations on social media strategy coming up, I wanted to share the specifics behind the slide’s message in more detail.

Here are 26 pieces of dating advice as valuable in trying to form a personal relationship as they are in creating successful social media-based relationships:

Preparing for Potential Relationships

As You Begin Pursuing Potential Relationships

In the Early Stages of a Relationship

  • Allow time to find out what’s interesting about the other person. What’s intriguing about someone else may not be readily apparent after a first meeting.
  • Make reasonable promises that you expect to keep on a timely basis.
  • Don’t place a lot of expectations on the relationship early on. Forget about demanding commitments right away or making someone change their behaviors as a precursor to continuing the relationship.
  • Don’t try to suffocate the person with too much communication.
  • Work to create positive, enjoyable time together without pressure to consummate the relationship right away.
  • Be available when the other person is interested. That means you have to commit to devoting the time to make a relationship work.
  • Small gestures are important and appropriate early on to show you’re interested in a relationship.

Follow all this advice faithfully, and your popularity and attractiveness is sure to rise both online and IRL. – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we’ve developed  integrated social media strategy for other brands and can do the same for yours.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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7

It’s the time of year when companies turn attention to strategic and annual business planning. Several times while giving strategic thinking and innovation training presentations the past few weeks on “Taking the NO Out of Business InNOvation,” I’ve been asked:

“Who should participate in successful strategic thinking and planning efforts?”

My answer is always the same:

You need to have three types of people involved for successful strategic thinking and planning. Getting diverse perspectives involved is of primary importance in business success.

The three types of critical thinking perspectives vital to great strategic thinking, planning, and implementation are:

  • People with Frontline Business Experience – This includes operations, sales, customer service, and any other areas with P&L responsibility or close customer interaction. They provide a solid view of what’s going on in the business, what the business issues and opportunities are with customers and competitors, and what important strategy areas require attention.
  • People with Functional Expertise – Leaders in support areas of the business should bring insights into strengths, weaknesses, and key opportunities for important business processes including marketing, human resources, information technology, accounting, finance, etc.
  • People with a Creative / Innovative Orientation – These people, regardless of foreknowledge of a strategy effort’s focus or experience inside a company, are adept at looking at business, industry, and organizational situations in unconventional ways.

These three groups are all important to include because they tend to see and react to situations from very different perspectives. This intermingling of viewpoints is vital to the best strategic plans.

So what happens if you involve only people with one of these perspectives?

  • Frontline business people, left to their own in planning, tend to come up with more conventional and incremental strategies. Because they’re so close to a company’s operations, there can be a real reluctance to stretch capabilities adequately to address emerging marketplace issues.
  • If only functional experts are involved, you’re liable to get great process ideas and strategies which improve the internal workings of a business but may not have the necessary impact on the organization’s business results.
  • And involving only creative people in planning?  Trust me, you’ll generate really cool, incredible ideas, but too often, there is no way to actually bring them to the market successfully.

The net of all this is for the strongest strategic plan, you need to find ways to include people with each of these perspectives. The challenge is it’s very often difficult for these three groups to work together successfully and productively. That’s where we’ve designed and use The Brainzooming Group strategy development approach which allows people with each of these points of view to actively and quickly build on the ideas of others to create strong, implementable plans. - Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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10

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

Monday’s post was about the importance of paying enough attention to customers that you talk to them when they’re already thinking about your brand. That very day, I had a first-time airline-related customer service situation which highlighted another basic and important service concept: thinking about service delivery in a strategic way from the customer’s point of view.

On a Continental Express plane (the jets so small there’s only one flight attendant), pre-flight instructions are recorded. This allows the flight attendant to demonstrate the various instructions without having to bounce back and forth between the intercom and the demonstration. Since I actually do try and pay attention, I noticed the flight attendant was mouthing the pre-recorded instructions’ words. Given how gregarious she had been on an earlier announcement, I laughed, thinking she had to be a former Southwest employee who was mocking the pre-recorded voice.

When she came by later for the beverage service, I mentioned noticing she was having fun with the recording. She surprised me by saying the reason she mouthed the words was for hearing-impaired passengers. By her reckoning, maybe if they couldn’t hear the recording, they might at least be able to read her lips to get the safety instructions.

I’ve been on a lot of other Continental Express flights (including one the day before) and have never seen this happen. I can only credit the great insight and modification to the standard process to her strategic thinking ability and mentally observing service delivery from the customer’s perspective to modify it for a minority audience segment’s benefit.

We should all be that perceptive and adept at strategic thinking! –  Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategy options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your brand strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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10

I’ll admit to being a very pre-meditated traveler. The night before a trip where I’m speaking to a conference or facilitating a Brainzooming strategy session, I spend time visualizing key events during the trip, thinking through what needs to be packed and what unusual situations to prepare for, just in case. Part of the pre-trip strategy involves identifying what absolutely has to be addressed before leaving and what can be handled while traveling.

As a result, it was a welcome surprise the night before my recent trip to speak to the Milwaukee Business Marketing Association when the following email arrived from Southwest Airlines.

Just as I was trying to anticipate what emails could get sent prior to leaving, the Southwest notification provided an alert that the next day’s flight would have Wi-Fi. How great to be able to incorporate this foreknowledge into planning for what could get accomplished while on the early flight the next morning.

Southwest Airlines successfully nailed what’s typically a big challenge for brands: knowing its customers well enough to understand when they’ll already be thinking about its brand. By anticipating this situation, Southwest increased receptiveness to its message since I already had its brand on my mind.

The challenge? While this is an ideal situation for a brand (talking to customers when they’re already focused on you), there’s no easy formula for doing it well. It really does take intense understanding of your marketplace, perhaps through ethnographic research where you have an opportunity to observe how your customers function and interact with your brand even when your brand isn’t formally present.  – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategy options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your brand strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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