Implementation | The Brainzooming Group - Part 118 – page 118
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If you haven’t started already, there’s not much time left to make sure your organization is asking itself innovative strategic planning questions and looking for top opportunities before 2013 starts.

The good news in all this, however, is it’s ALWAYS a good time for strategic thinking and considering innovative strategic planning questions. No matter when it is, you can use great questions to push your strategic thinking and move you into increasingly smarter, more differentiated, and successful market strategies.

Strategic Thinking Questions for Next Year

Reviewing conference tweets, Brainzooming strategic planning engagements, and leftovers in our strategic thinking exercise R&D lab, here are fifteen innovative strategic planning questions (plus a bonus ice breaker question) to move to the top of your strategic planning questions list – whether you’ve started planning or not!

Strategy & Purpose Questions

  • When we say our purpose and messages aloud to someone outside our business, do these statements make sense? (Evan Conway, president of OneLouder, a Kansas City-based mobile app developer)
  • What would you do differently if you HAD TO get 10x better / bigger in the next 12 months? (An incredibly challenging question was inspired by Chuck Dymer – Brilliance Activator)

Strategic Marketing Questions

  • How can we shift more value to the front end of a customer relationship, not charging anything until later when the customer fully realizes the benefit? (Inspired by TEDxKC presenter, Shai Reshef)
  • Have we set a pace for our brand experience to allow a customer to get the maximum value from our brand? (Inspired by Julian Zugazagoitia, Director of the The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art at TEDxKC)
  • What are our organization’s passion and purpose, and how are we effectively and innovatively marketing them? (From BigIdeas12 conference tweets)

Strategic Innovation Questions

  • How can we get more ideas at early stages when it’s easier and less expensive to incorporate great ideas? (Inspired by Rob Grace of Bazillion Pictures)
  • What can be removed from what we do / produce? (A variation on a Steve Jobs question to drive simplicity, via Ken Segall, author of “Insanely Simple” affiliate link)
  • In what ways can we innovate to offer “more for less”? (Michael Raynor, author of “The Innovator’s Manifesto” affiliate link)
  • To identify potential innovation opportunities, what are the most frequent workarounds customers are asking our sales, customer service, and other representatives to perform?
  • How can we break up big change into pieces too inconsequential to fail (i.e., no matter what happens, we’ll either meet our objectives or learn so much when we don’t, we still win)?

Customer and Market Questions

  • Who specifically is representing the customer 24/7 in our business?
  • What benefits are our customers seeking when they buy from us, and who else is poised to deliver those benefits to them?

Learning Organization Questions

  • Who are our rising stars two jobs away from ever being included in strategic planning that need to be included starting right now?
  • What makes the work our organization does worth it for our employees? (From author of “The Commitment Engine” author, John Jantsch at TEDxKC affiliate link)
  • How are we learning (individually and as an organization) by doing, failing, collaborating, creating, and teaching? (Danya Cheskis-Gold of Skillshare at BigIdeas12)

And a Bonus 16th Strategic Thinking Question – My New Favorite Ice Breaker

  • If you could have the characters in any painting come to life, which painting would you choose? (A wonderful ice breaker from Amy Dixon of CreativeRN.com on Twitter that elicits very diverse and insightful answers)

Still Need to Get Your Strategic Planning Set for Next Year?

If you’d like help in developing your annual plan done faster than ever, contact us at 816-509-5320 or email info@brainzooming.com.

Our Brainzooming name means what it says: we’ll stretch your brains through strategic thinking exercises to consider new opportunities and quickly zoom them into a plan that’s ready for next year when next year starts! We’d love to help you hit next year zooming!   – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

If you’re struggling to create or sustain innovation and growth, The Brainzooming Group can be the strategic catalyst you need. We will apply our  strategic thinking, brainstorming, and implementation tools to help you create greater innovation success. Contact us at info@brainzooming.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you figure out how to work around innovation and implementation challenges.


Find New Resources to Innovate!

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Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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6

Author Jim Collins checking out my orange shoes.

I was first introduced to the idea of an organization having a core purpose statement when our CMO pushed for developing a core purpose as discussed in a Harvard Business Review article by Jim Collins and Jerry Porras.

Core Purpose Statements in Organizations

A core purpose statement for an organization is essentially its reason for existence. But rather than simply stating what the organization produces or sells, its core purpose statement should be relatively long-term articulation of why the organization warrants a place in the market along with what drives it toward success. It’s neither a brand promise nor a slogan (which are shorter term), but congruence between all three statements is important.

A couple of examples of core purpose statements we used at the time were:

  • 3M – To solve unsolved problems innovatively.
  • Walmart – To give ordinary folk the chance to buy the same things as rich people.

Ultimately, the core purpose we developed as a transportation services company was: To make global commerce work by connecting people, places, & information.

Each of these has a similar format:

  • To (VERB)
  • WHAT? Or WHO?
  • HOW? WHAT? Or WHY?

What was particularly intriguing for me was the Walmart core purpose is about “giving,” and ours was about “making,” even though Walmart doesn’t give things away, and we didn’t make anything as a service company. This discontinuity between what a company does and its reason for being indicates a certain positive internal tension to drive an organization forward to a bigger goal and success.

How does a core purpose statement translate for an individual as part of personal branding?

As an outgrowth of the work we did, and as I started to speak to groups on personal branding, I developed a personal core purpose statement. For an individual, it is the driving force in your life to which all your activities are tied.

When developing my personal statement, I was in a period of spiritual reawakening. As a result, the original version of my core purpose statement, which was tied to a sense of financial freedom, transformed completely into one that defined success as serving others on a daily basis.

My own core purpose statement has been a tremendously important force in helping me abandon trying to balance my life’s activities. Instead, I focus on the success of aligning my priorities, decisions, and activities to my core purpose. That’s provided an incredible amount of peace of mind over the years.

Questions to Develop a Personal Core Purpose Statement

What gets you up every morning?

You can ask and answer these questions to start formulating ideas for your core purpose:

  • What things motivate me to get up & get out of bed every morning?
  • In what ways am I of the greatest service to others?
  • What brings me happiness & contentment?
  • What things do I find most fulfilling?
  • On what would I spend my time, talents, & attention if I didn’t have to work?
  • At the end of my life, what things will make me smile when I look back?

Use the format shared above to structure the common themes emerging from your answers into a personal core purpose statement. And whether you share your personal core purpose with others is a decision you’ll have to make. Quite frankly, I’ve only shared the exact wording of mine with a couple of people. Instead, my hope is that people see the impact of it in my behaviors and the way I lead my life.

What do you think about a core purpose statement leading to success in a career?

Is this a new concept for you, or have you already developed a statement? If you already have one in place, how does it help shape your life? – Mike Brown

 

Subscribe for Free to the Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic new ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these innovation benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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1

It can be easy for bloggers entering the holiday season to slack off on regularly publishing the company blog. Bloggers may neglect the schedule for publishing on the company blog because of the struggle with what to blog about to effectively cut through all the holiday-related messages. Blogging neglect can also come from seeing readership and other activity metrics on the company blog decline in previous years as customers turn attention to the holidays.

Rather than getting out of the blogging routine, go out of your way to deliver highly valuable content between now and early next year. When it comes to what to blog about, turn your blogging attention to publishing content that helps customers better prepare for the end of the current year and the start of the next.

10 Ideas for What to Blog About Now

For you bloggers, here are ten ideas for what to blog about in the coming weeks to deliver highly valuable and time-sensitive content for your customers:

  • Important end of year issues your customers need to address
  • Critical start of the year issues your customers need to address
  • Regulatory changes taking place within and around your industry that will have an impact on customers
  • Your organization’s perspective on market conditions in the coming year (perhaps based on input from talking with multiple customers)
  • Ways customers (and non-customers) in your market can maximize the value they get from products and services in your business category in the coming year
  • Background on new products and services you’ll introduce to address customer needs / demands in the coming year
  • Summarized updates on relevant market research you’ve conducted that would be beneficial for your customers to understand
  • Seasonal and year-end reflections from you or key people in your organization
  • An annual recap on what’s happened in your marketplace the past twelve months
  • Tips for hitting the ground running in January

That’s just a start on what to blog about for the turn of the year. You can definitely incorporate other specifics from your business to expand the list.

Make Your Year-End Blogging Evergreen

While the blog topics above are time-sensitive, you can write the blog posts to be more evergreen (i.e., extending their timeliness into the early weeks of next year, if not subsequent years).

Bloggers can make  company blog posts more evergreen by:

  • Referring to “this year” and “next year” instead of specific year numbers
  • Covering general principles and linking to more time-specific background sources
  • Prioritizing perennial advice/information and concentrating time-specific content in only certain blog posts
  • Refreshing blog posts early next year to switch out or update time-specific content

Keep Blogging in the Weeks Ahead

While daily blog readership may have lagged in previous years, you can use these ten ideas on what to blog about to keep great content coming for readers who are still reading now – and for those who will catch up with your valuable blog content in the first part of next year too! – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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16

There is clearly tremendous value in having diverse, positive creative thinking skills on your creative team. What you might be overlooking, however, is the value of having access to creative thinking skills that might not typically be considered particularly constructive for a creative team’s success.

Consider It “Critical” Thinking

While creative instigators can be vital to the robust development of creative thinking, you can’t afford to let it coast its way toward implementation without being challenged. “Critical” thinking  make your creative thinking stronger near-term and your creative thinking skills sharper over time.

Don’t let a premature implementation push leave your creative thinking work vulnerable to critical challenges too late in the creative development process.

Select your creative team to make sure you identify the individuals who will supply five critical thinking perspectives to make your creative thinking stronger:

1. The Skeptic

The skeptic isn’t going to believe anything you tell them the first time. The skeptic will demand proof for the creative thinking you’re trying to sell to them. The skeptic making you prove everything, however, forces you to ensure you have the strategic and insight-driven support for your creative ideas.

2. The Short Attention Span Theater Fan

Certain people will not or cannot sit still for an in-depth explanation of your creative thinking. You might have only three PowerPoint slides worth of time to provide the background, make your recommendation, and show your supporting rationale. When someone on your team has a short attention span, you’ll get much better at getting to the point . . . or you’ll be talking to yourself in an empty room!

3. An Argumentative So and So

We all know people who object to everything. Everything is wrong; nothing will work. And they are ready to let you know all the things you can expect to fall short with your creative ideas. Talk about critical thinking! As a result, making your case to an argumentative person will cause you to be ready to answer all kinds of passionate, unexpected objections to the creative ideas you believe in so strongly.

4. The Dense Person

Some people simply don’t “get” things as fast as others. You can explain a new idea and see it in their eyes or in their body language: something about your creative idea isn’t clicking. Even if your dense creative team member does get the idea, he or she will not get it the next time you discuss it, so you’ll have to explain it again. While it may feel as if repetitive explanations are taking up time, repeating your creative idea multiple times will productively challenge the consistency of your thinking and your attention to strategic detail.

5. Your Narrow Minded Associate

The creative team member who has a clearly different, and markedly narrower, perspective than you can be maddening most of the time. These people do not (or simply refuse to) see the bigger picture. They also don’t have much time or respect for alternatives viewpoints to their own. Where they are beneficial as you try to sell your creative ideas, however, is when they force you to find (or incorporate) benefits to address non-believers in your audience.

Do you know who the problem people are on your creative team?

Are these “critical” creative thinking skills accounted for on your creative team? Are there other challenging creative thinking skills  you depend upon for your creative success? Let’s hear about them! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

One of the most frequent questions people ask me is, “How do you come up with the creative inspiration for what to blog about five days a week?”

My answer is I pay attention all the time for creative inspiration and start to process experiences through a very specific filter: “How could this interaction, story, factoid, image (or whatever it is) fit as a Brainzooming blog post?”

When you go through life expecting EVERYTHING to provide creative inspiration for what to blog about, you see potential topics EVERYWHERE.

For me, the bigger challenge is finding the time to turn all the creative inspiration into blog content both of us (you and me) would be interested in reading.

I’m not a fast writer, and I’ve gotten even slower through distracting myself while writing and incorporating more SEO-oriented steps than when the Brainzooming blog started. The result is many ideas never make it into completed blog posts, although some will show up even a year or two later. Never underestimate the value of historical creative inspiration!

Brainzooming Creative Inspiration – What to Blog About

Several months ago, I wrote a Brainzooming post detailing the creative inspiration for the previous thirty posts. Some of the points of creative inspiration are the same, but many differ from the previous article on what to blog about:

1. You are inspired by stories and challenges others are sharing on Facebook (Being Thankful for the Blessings in the Challenging Parts of Life)

2. Something already written can be recast and made more helpful than when it was originally written (Current Clients, New Opportunities – Five Ideas to Discover New Growth)

3. You’re trying to motivate yourself to improve on things that bother you about yourself (Distracting Yourself – 19 Ways to Undermine Your Success)

4. There’s a keyword phrase generating favorable blog traffic, and it’s time to add more blog content on the topic (Strategic Thinking Exercises – 6 Characteristics the Best Ones Have)

5. Many intriguing articles on a topic are taking up space in your web browser, and it’s easier to summarize them in a blog post than bookmark the links (10 Articles on Creativity Lovers, Haters, Branding, Insights and Storytelling)

6. You’re trying to solve your own business challenge, and you use a blog post to think through your best options (Combat Client Block – 8 Ways to Beat Client-Specific Creative Block)

7. A sales call surfaces an issue you know others are contending with as well (Social Networking, Personal Relationships & 7 Content Strategy Questions)

8. There’s an opportunity to combine content only tangentially related to your blogging subject with a different angle to make it relevant (Innovation Success – Innovating, Strategy & Pissing Off People)

9. Marking an anniversary by sharing lessons learned (What to Blog About and How – 25 Blogging Lessons from 5 Years and Number 22: 25 Lessons Learned (or Reconfirmed) in Year Three Away from Corporate Life)

10. Creating a compilation of previous articles as a resource for readers and yourself (Project Management Techniques – 21 Articles to Better Manage Projects)

11. There’s an opportunity to link your subject to a current news topic (Political Concession Speeches – Why Are They the Best of the Election Campaign?)

12. A great, frequent guest blogger has written a post (Innovation Success Through Planning, Preparation, and Organization by Woody Bendle and Number 24 Creative Thinking Exercise – SCAMPER around KC by Woody Bendle)

13. It’s possible to turn too much time watching TV into a lesson-oriented blog post (Creative Process – 5 Creative Ideas with a Twist for Product Design)

14. A bizarre situation has been staring you in the face for years, and you finally figure out an angle to turn it into a blog (Brand Experience, Glass Houses, and Naked Shower Guy)

15. A great, new guest blogger has written a post – after you made a request on Twitter (The Top Three Don’ts of Brand Building by Julie Cottineau)

16. A current event provides an opportunity to write something more outrageous than you would ever typically address (Zombies and Vampires – Strategic Perspectives on Their Popularity)

17. In the course of a phone conversation with a potential client, you list out all the items for a blog post (Strategic Planning – 7 Questions for Avoiding Strategic Management Failures)

18. It makes sense to share some behind the scenes info on a social media strategy you use (Social Media – 5 Tips to Sharing an Evergreen Blog Post)

19. You’ve developed a guest post for another blogger you can rewrite into fresh content for your own blog (Brainstorming Tools – Drawing on Big Creative Ideas)

20. A new approach to what you do is still in the creative thinking stage, and you’re interested in getting reactions to it (Strategic Thinking Exercise – Black Swan Events in Your Plan)

21. You share a lesson you don’t particularly like that you’ve had to learn to like and embrace (Creative Inspiration – Creative Ideas from Your Daily Life)

22. See number 9

23. A conference event you attend reveals a real-life factoid serves as a case study (Television Program Ideas – How Many Ideas Per Television Series?)

24. See number 12

25. A social media rockstar is pissing and moaning about something that isn’t a problem, and you want to respond in a longer format (Social Media – 19 Content Strategy Ideas from a TV Network)

26. You’re having a conversation with someone who tells you something about what they are doing, and it would be a perfect guest blog post (The Importance of a Passion Project by Alyssa Murfey)

27. Another blogger’s intriguing blog title wasn’t matched by an intriguing post, so you write the post the other blogger should have written (Brainstorming Ideas – 10 Signs You’re Done Brainstorming)

28. You’ve written enough Twitter posts to create a decent compilation (Twitter Topics on @Brainzooming – This Tweet Is for You)

29. You sit through a speech that’s so bad and lacking in beneficial information your only choice is to write about how bad the presentation is (Keynote Presenter Advice – Don’t Do These Things)

30. You’ve had to develop a new skill that your audience can benefit from developing as well (Social Media Content – 7 Ways to Repurpose What You’ve Written)

What creative inspiration does this list suggest about what to blog about for your brand?

– Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining social media ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your social media  strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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7

Today is Thanksgiving in the United States. It used to be a holiday steeped in religion and prayers of thanks for blessings we have received.

Now, it seems to be less about giving thanks and more about prayers of supplication:

So while there are still lots of prayers involved with Thanksgiving, they are hardly the types of prayers one might hope for on this day set aside to reflect on our blessings.

Speaking of Blessings in the Challenging Parts of Life

Thinking about the past few years, the most important thing I’ve learned is there are blessings in everything we’re presented in life – whether we perceive those things as good OR bad.

That hadn’t been my mindset before. Previously, I looked at good things as blessings and (apparently) bad things as annoyances that were there primarily because of something going awry. And those things needed to be FIXED to turn them into blessings.

Through a lot of reflection (and listening to a lot of EWTN), it’s become apparent how much good comes out of things I’d have considered as debacles just a few years ago.

One example?

Early in 2011 I was headed to Columbus, OH to work with Nate Riggs for several days of client meetings. Since it was February, I purposely booked my flight to arrive the day before to account for any potential weather delays. Sure enough, I flew in a day ahead of the great blizzard of 2011.

Just as we were pulling into Nate’s office, I received a call from our client asking when I was planning on getting into town. He informed me they not only had an emergency all-department meeting been scheduled for the next day (when our meetings were supposed to be going on), but because of the blizzard, the company was likely going to be on ½ days for the next several days. His hope was that I hadn’t left Kansas City so we could simply cancel everything.

The old me would be at the peak of frustration from having traveled to Ohio to have the client tell me our meetings (which we were told were a big deal to get done ASAP) were now in several days of TBD status.

The newer me realized there must be some reason I was supposed to be in Columbus, and it was important to sit back and see what it was.

I learned the reason the next morning, when our suddenly open schedule provided the opportunity for Nate and I to visit the Arvey store and meet Cheri Allbritton. Our visit probably wasn’t more than 20 minutes, and it’s the only time Cheri and I have met in person. But that time with the three of us talking in her office was a vital part of cementing a friendship that has flourished online. And this friendship was especially important as Cheri went through a very difficult 2011. I had the blessing to learn from the grace with which Cheri handled the real life challenges she was facing.

Without the snowstorm, there never would have been time to meet.

And guess what?

We got all our meetings done in a compressed time frame, and even though Chicago had been shut down the day before, I flew through Midway with no delays.

That’s only one example. I could go on with others, but won’t . . . at least not right now.

Being Thankful

So here’s my prayer for you on Thanksgiving: that we’re all able to embrace and learn from the challenges we face – big and small – and have the gift of patience to look for and discern the blessings behind each challenge.

And I guess that prayer even applies to the challenge of missing out on the last iPad deal you waited in line for hours to get at the big box electronics store!

Happy Thankshopgiving! – Mike Brown

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic new ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these innovation benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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0

A business associate returned  from a manufacturers’ conference reporting new opportunities for growth and business development among attendees were generally coming from them looking at current clients in new ways.

What a great, often overlooked, reminder.

While it may be easy for organizations to get bored with their same old clients, surprising, unrealized new opportunities are often present with clients you have had for years. To discover new opportunities with current clients, however, can depend on pushing what you’re already doing on business development into new areas.

Five Ideas to Discover New Opportunities with Current Clients

Here are five ideas for taking your business development efforts into new, unexplored territory, by discovering new opportunities with current clients:

1. Go beyond just knowing your client’s job responsibilities

Make sure you know the range of duties for which your client contact has responsibility. Also find out, however, where your client spends too much or too little effort versus how they would like to allocate their time. A client spending more time than desired on an activity signals an opportunity to offer new ways to streamline and reduce demands on them. Areas where they aren’t spending enough time could be new opportunities to address what’s missing in their desired efforts.

2. Discover your customer’s business challenges beyond your category

After calling on a customer for some time, you may only focus on challenges they have tied to your product or service. Work to discover a customer’s biggest challenges outside your business category, too. With a broader view of a customer’s challenges, you can identify additional opportunities to solve, situations a partner can help address, or completely new business solutions to stretch your organization.

3. Ask how all your customer’s vendors are performing

It’s always helpful to play the Spy vs. Spy game of trying figure out how you’re doing relative to direct competitors. Additionally, start concerning yourself with how the providers of any product or service your client uses are making your client more successful. You can uncover value-creating approaches other vendors have identified for your client that you may be able to engineer into what you deliver for them.

4. Take a backward look at your client’s purchase decisions

If a customer is doing business with you, they’re “satisfied,” or they’d choose one of the many other options available to them. Instead of focusing on satisfaction levels when talking directly with clients, spend time discussing why the client STARTED and continues to buy from you. This line of discussion provides the opportunity to see if you’re still meeting initial expectations, if you’ve expanded the value you’re delivering, and if new needs/decision factors are shaping the client’s CURRENT expectations.

5. Dig for the problems being created for your client by . . . (wait for it) . . . you

It’s nice to hear nice things about how you are performing for a client. Beyond probing for what’s going well, it’s critical to uncover the customer’s biggest issues and how your organization could be unknowingly exacerbating them. Getting to the heart of this yields vital insights into how products, services, and processes your organization considers standard gum up the works for your clients and hold back your growth in serving them.

What are you doing to look at current clients in new ways to discover new growth opportunities?

There are obviously many more approaches to look at current clients to find new opportunities. These five ideas, however, can definitely open up unaddressed possibilities in any long-term business relationship. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

If you’re struggling to create or sustain innovation and growth, The Brainzooming Group can be the strategic catalyst you need. We will apply our  strategic thinking, brainstorming, and implementation tools to help you create greater innovation success. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you figure out how to work around innovation and implementation challenges.


Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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