Implementation | The Brainzooming Group - Part 255 – page 255
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The initial posts on this blog were on closing the strategic thinking gap that develops in many businesses (i.e., a desire to invest significant time on strategic issues, but little time spent in reality). Here are links to the five posts in order:

Why strategic thinking doesn’t happen
Something’s missing in strategic thinking
Somebody’s missing from the strategic thinking effort
Tools to improve strategic thinking’s efficiency & effectiveness
Outcomes are missing from strategic thinking & wrap-up

The posts provide an overview of specific approaches that can be taken to improve the quality & output of strategic thinking efforts in business.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Holidays often present our most memorable experiences because of the emotional range they touch – whether positive or negative. The strong emotional connections coupled with the high degree of personal interest in holidays fixes long ago memories in our minds as if they happened yesterday.

When we’re presenting ideas in business though, we usually don’t think about this relationship that creates holiday memories:

Memorability = Degree of Personal Interest x Intensity of Emotions
At best, business presentations assume some implied level of personal interest (since after all, it’s a business topic) and stop short of including any emotion (since after all, it’s a business topic). When you work through the formula above for most business presentations (Minimal personal interest x Zero emotion), you get NO memorability.

For your next business communication, use the formula to your advantage by thinking through and incorporating answers to the following questions when developing and delivering ideas.

To increase personal interest, for each person in the audience answer:

  • What about the business is important either as a motivator (opportunities, cost savings, satisfying customers, increasing stock price, etc.) or as a fear (competitors, losing customers, deteriorating EPS, etc.) for this person?
  • From what perspective does this person think about the business, and how does that shape their information processing and decision making?
  • What words do they use to talk about the business?
  • What are their most important personal motivators (advancement, looking good, being smart, etc.) and fears (losing a job, looking bad, being dumb, etc.)?

To increase the emotional connection of your presentation, think about how you could use:

  • Surprise – is there a different way to order or communicate the content to be more surprising?
  • Drama – would making it a suspenseful story or acting out part of it add a beneficial sense of drama?
  • Humor – if the information is challenging, can you use humor (maybe a funny cartoon or story) to help reduce defensiveness?
  • Excitement – is there an alternative format (movie clip, audience participation) that would be more exciting than Powerpoint?

One final consideration in seeking a more emotional connection – how receptive is your organization to incorporating an emotional angle and how will you signal what you’re doing? Both points are important so that you are bringing your audience along with you to get the maximum positive impact.

So back to holiday memorability. It’s late December – Christmas, Kwanza, and New Year’s are coming up; Hanukkah is over. I’ll stop focusing on creating business memories and get started on holiday memories if you’ll do the same! But let’s meet back here right after the first of the year. Have a blessed holiday season full of wonderful memories!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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When you don’t have anything interesting to say, step aside and let the people who do have something to say have the floor:

  • “ . . . by pitting multiple scenarios of the future against one another and leaving many different doors open, you can prepare yourself for a future that is inherently unpredictable. Brainstorming pays off. And the more possibilities you can entertain, the less likely you are to be blindsided.” – Peter Coy and Neil Gross, Business Week, August 30, 1999
  • “The best way to have a good idea is to have lots of ideas.” – Linus Pauling
  • “I not only use all the brains I have, but all I can borrow.” – Woodrow Wilson
  • “It’s hard for corporations to understand that creativity is not just about succeeding. It’s about experimenting and discovering.” – Gordon Mackenzie
  • “Don’t ever miss a day without improving something personally.” – David Glass, Wal-Mart, 2000
  • “Your teaching must have the integrity of serious, sound words to which no one can take exception. If it does, no opponent will be able to find anything bad to say about us, and hostility will yield to shame.” – Paul of Tarsus
  • “Be so good that they can’t ignore you.” – Steve Martin

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Yesterday’s post talked about building a personal creative team that you can reach out to compensate for your creative shortcomings. It’s a tremendously valuable approach to take.

Here are three keys that will help you cultivate a strong personal creative team:

  • Start with the attitude of giving yourself to others. Before thinking about how people can benefit you, understand your talents so that you know how you can first serve them. I initially heard Zig Ziglar say that the best way to ensure your own success is by figuring out how to make as many other people as possible successful.
  • Treat people nicely, be friendly, and smile (either in person or in your voice or written word if you’re communicating via voice or email). Taking the first step to be kind, appreciative, and friendly will create incredible relationship opportunities and open many doors that might appear to be closed.
  • Embrace “mutualism” – a sincere effort to find commonly shared goals, even among potential competitors, where you can realize a greater good. A great example is former presidents Bush and Clinton coming together several years ago for Tsunami relief. Although political rivals, their effort helped others, while benefiting each of them personally in different ways. Embracing mutualism requires the ability to compromise, reprioritize, and share: risk, success, and the limelight.

There are many other keys to building a great team, but these three will take you much of the way. Give them a try as you add to your creative team.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Creativity in teams is critical because no single creative gift is sufficient in an of itself. A team provides the opportunity to assemble a whole variety of talents in a strategic fashion. It’s similar to the song “The Twelve Days of Christmas” where a whole variety of gifts are needed to express true love.

So as you make up your holiday card list, keep track of something besides who sent you a card last year: do a double check to ensure that you have a full range of personalities and talents among your informal creative team’s members. See if you have someone on your list for each of these 12 characteristics:

  • Artistic
  • Funny
  • Inventive
  • Stylish
  • Adventurous
  • Well-Read
  • Diverse
  • Quirky
  • Playful
  • Spontaneous
  • Curious
  • Pop-Cultured

If there’s a creative talent missing on your team, resolve to identify a new team member in the new year that expresses their creativity in that manner. And if you don’t have a creative team you can reach out to, start building it! You’ll truly love the impact that it will have on you!  – Mike Brown

If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on creativity, strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Dear Kids,

Just like your management team at work, Santa’s very busy this time of year, and while he’d love to spend time with each letter, there are only so many hours in the work day.

Want to make sure Santa gets the point of your request so that you’re not disappointed this holiday season? Take a tip from “Winning with the P&G 99: 99 Principles and Practices of Procter Gambles Success” by Charles Decker and send him a brief (one-page at most) recommendation making it clear very quickly to Santa how good you’ve been and what you’d like. Here’s the 4-section recommendation format to use:

  1. Brief Background – Provide a quick overview of the issue that your recommendation is addressing so that your boss (I mean Santa) knows what you’re covering.
  2. Recommendation – Clearly & succinctly state what you think should be done.
  3. Rationale – List the reasons that support why the thing that you think should happen should happen.
  4. Next Actions – If the recommendation’s accepted, list out the next things that have to take place.

Let’s apply the approach (sans the headers that you’d use in a business memo) to our holiday letter:

Dear Santa,

I just wanted to update you on what a good boy I’ve been this year and suggest a gift that would truly be appreciated.

This Christmas, I recommend that you bring me a new tablet computer.

This gift is warranted because I’ve really tried to help my wife more around the house this year, including yard work (which I really don’t like). The tablet computer would allow me the flexibility to work on this blog while away from home, to stay in contact with friends and loved ones, to get work done on airplanes more easily, and to draw cartoons for my presentations.

If you agree that a tablet computer makes sense as a gift, please deliver it on the evening of December 24 in Hays, KS, where we’ll be celebrating Christmas with my family. Thank you, and please let me know if you have any questions.

Sincerely,
Mike

So there you have it kids. In fewer than a dozen lines, we’ve made our recommendation and laid out the best case. Try it with Santa AND try it at the office. It really works in cutting through the clutter and getting to decisions faster.

Btw – if you’re still doing holiday shopping, Amazon lists copies of the “P&G 99” for $1.89. That’s less than 2 cents per principle or practice – you won’t find a cheaper gift that will so dramatically improve your staff’s performance this coming year! Order now!!!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Jay Conrad Levinson is the father of guerrilla marketing, the concept that businesses can reap greater rewards through the strategic use of low- and no-cost marketing tools. He says that there are at least 100 guerrilla marketing tools available to any business.

Beyond the standard tool list that Levinson uses, I’ve found it helpful to get marketing teams to work through a specific question-based exercise to identify marketing tools unique or at least specific to their own businesses.

Use the list below with your marketing team. One way is for a team member to identify as many answers to a specific question as possible within a 3 minute period, and then rotate the question to the next team member to build on the list:

  • What do we want to promote?
  • What are our features, benefits & competitive advantages? Which are most meaningful?
  • What communications vehicles are in place?
  • What ideas/words/phrases do we use?
  • Who are experts/partners? What’s notable about them?
  • Where do our audiences congregate (geographically or virtually) and/or receive our messages?
  • What motivates our audiences?
  • How can we get permission and the info to keep marketing to our audiences?
  • What business & personal relationships do we have that could be of assistance?
  • Who would like to be involved with us in growing our business?
  • Who could we help make more successful?
  • What interactions do we have with our audience?
  • What new interactions can we create?
  • What tools or ideas can we “steal”?

I’ve had a team of 8 to 10 people build a list of more than 200 tools (many of which they’d never thought of using) within a 25 minute period as everyone worked individually using the rotating question approach.

You can also check out a more focused set of areas to brainstorm and identify specific social media resources and tools your organization can use.

Give this exercise a try at your next staff meeting or planning session, and then go back through your marketing plan to make sure you’re using as many of the tools as possible that you’ve identified.  – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can develop an integrated, guerrilla marketing-oriented strategy for your brand.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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