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Applause is a wonderful part of any conference event. Applause makes the speakers feel better. Applause signals the attendees are enjoying the event. Applause keeps things lively.

None of that means applause always happens spontaneously, however.

How many conference events have you been to where speakers start or finish with no applause?

I’ve been to plenty.

Sometimes there’s no applause because of the audience. Often, though, it’s because event organizers aren’t actively enabling applause as part of the event strategy.

5 Event Strategy Ideas for Generating Applause When You Need It

Want to make sure your event strategy maximizes its applause opportunities? Here are five ideas for doing the most with applause at your event, whether it’s a big conference or a small association luncheon or dinner.

Applause

1. Identify upfront where you want applause.

It’s easy to know you want applause when someone takes or leaves the stage. What are other places where you want applause? After videos? Following a certain big statement a speaker makes? When the event ends and people are prone to wander off? Create a list of all the places where applause will pump up the program and make it part of your event strategy.

2. Make sure there is always an applause starter in the audience.

This Individual (or potentially multiple individuals), is stationed off to the side in an inconspicuous spot. Your applause starter will do what the title suggests. This person is ready to start applauding at every point you want applause. Hand the applause starter the list you’ve developed, brief them on what will be happening throughout the event, and turn the applause starter loose to applaud in all the right places. The great thing an applause starter (trust me on this) is the audience will join in and readily applaud once someone takes the lead.

3. Invite the audience to applaud.

This may seem crass, but it needn’t be. When writing intros for speakers, add a line that says, “Please welcome,” “Help me welcome,” or “Let’s have a warm welcome for our speaker.” A line as simple as that along with the person doing the introducing actually starting light applause will ensure there is applause for a new speaker.

4. Keep presenters close to the stage.

It’s awkward when a speaker takes the stage from so far away that the audience’s applause dies long before the speaker arrives on stage. Position speakers close to the stage so they get where they need to be before the applause ends. If need be, make sure your speakers understand to move quickly and can reap all the benefits of the applause you are instigating for them.

5. If you’re a speaker, pause at your applause line.

Some speakers deliver applause lines (big messages that elicit audience affirmation) right and left. Other speakers do it occasionally. Either way, an effective applause line should be followed by a hard stop and a sufficient pause to allow the audience time to respond. If you’re a speaker who only occasionally has applause lines, take an applause line-type pause at other points in your presentation. With this, your real applause line pause doesn’t appear to be too needy. You may also want to arrange your own personal applause starter who knows where your applause lines are coming and gets things going.

Can we get some applause for these event strategy ideas?

I apologize if these five ideas seem basic. Based on the number of events I attend where there is far less applause than there should be, however, I suspect even these basic ideas are overlooked. – Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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You’ve heard the strategy. You’ve heard the strategy’s promise. Heck, you may be knee-deep or even waist-deep in the strategy.

What’s the strategy?

Giving away what you do for free in the hope of building an audience that will eventually pay you for what you do.

Strategic Thinking Question – When Does Free Become Getting Paid?

A lunch discussion the other day, however, was when and how do you start getting paid?

money-money-money

One intriguing answer to this strategic thinking question came via Jonathan Field as he addressed moving from free speaking to paid speaking. He tied the getting paid or speaking for free question to the size of the speaker’s “brand hand” relative to the event sponsor’s brand hand. In effect, whoever has the stronger brand sets the stage for how value (i.e., money) is divided, shared, and flows between the parties.

My answer to the strategic thinking question was you start getting paid when you are more willing and able to say, “No.”

When you’re in a position to turn down the people who expect things for free, you start setting boundaries about what’s free (i.e., maybe the first hour of consultation and listening is free before the meter starts running).

When you’re in a position to turn down the people who expect things for free, you address the “getting paid” conversation right away regarding how you’re delivering value with what you know and can share.

When you’re in a position to turn down the people who expect you to do things for far less than they are worth, you become much more explicit about what things cost. That applies to both what you charge and the costs to potential clients of not using someone as knowledgeable, proficient, and reliable as you.

What puts you in the position to say, “No,” to doing things for free?

It comes from addressing whatever weaknesses exist in your business.

That could mean, you have more than enough prospects or cash to sustain NOT doing business with the next potential client that comes along.

It might be you have reduced your overall business risk so you can take on the risk of saying NO.

It could also mean you really do have a better brand hand than the other party that wants you to do things for free or for much less than they are worth.

Or it may be something else.

Whatever it is that makes you say, “Yes, I’ll do that for free,” or give away things without ever having the conversation about free or paid, figure out what you need more of so you can say, “No,” to all the free work requests that are toxic for your success. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Have you seen this commercial about bad decisions people make in horror movies? It reminds me of the typical strategic planning process, where people KNOW it’s not going to be productive, yet they approach a kickoff strategic planning meeting the same way every year and think things will be different.

10 Signs of a Strategic Planning Meeting Nightmare

If you’re invited to a strategic planning meeting to prepare for next year or you are doing the one inviting to this type of meeting, look at the materials sent to participants.

Want to know in advance if the strategic planning process is going to be a nightmare?

Spooky

See how many of the descriptions below apply to what’s being sent to participants to prepare for the strategic planning process:

  1. The organizer isn’t a strategic thinker
  2. People or whole areas of the company that SHOULD be included are absent from the invite list
  3. A bunch of blank pages were sent out for people to complete in advance about past performance and future strategies
  4. Invitees are expected to come up with ideas, issues, strategies, and/or forecasts outside their expertise that they are supposed to fit into complex templates and forms
  5. The first time anyone will see what everyone else is working on is when they show up at the first strategic planning meeting
  6. The meeting is too internally focused, with insufficient time to address customers, competitors, markets, and important external factors
  7. There are lots of presentations, but no time for the group to work collaboratively
  8. Not enough time is set aside (within the meeting or across the whole planning process) to create a plan that meaningfully (and not just incrementally) improves things
  9. The person leading the strategic planning meeting has too much authority over the participants and will sway their perspectives
  10. It’s not clear how decisions are going to be made about priorities and what to do for next year

Do any of these sound familiar?

I’m not sure how many of these descriptors completely tip the scales toward ensuring your strategic planning process is going to be a nightmare.

If more than four or five of them describe your upcoming strategic planning meeting, however, you can pretty much rest assured it’s going to be a nightmare.

Want to change your strategic planning process for the better?

Contact us (info@brainzooming.com or 816-509-5320).

There’s still time (yes, there is still time) to make a course correction and turn your strategic planning meeting into something productive and beneficial.

Think of us as the running car in the commercial, and you can leave all your horrors to the horror movies!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Data about your website is great.

Data patterns related to your website are even better.

Having big data to tell you how people react to different scenarios and situations on your website is the best yet.

When you are just launching a website, however, you may not have any data.

When that’s the case, either you can design something that fits a design aesthetic, or you can take what you know, answer sound strategic thinking questions, and design a website that makes strategic sense.

Strategic Thinking Questions – 3 Questions for New Website Design

We were looking at a new website the other day designed for the user to “scroll, scroll, and keep scrolling.” The nagging strategic issue was, “Why in the world would an audience member want to keep scrolling?”

To help the website creator through the strategic thinking to answer this question, we put together the strategic thinking exercise below. It lists each of the main pages of the website down the left column. Across the three columns to the right are three strategic thinking questions, all asked in the voice of the user:

  • “Why should I stay interested?”
  • “Why should I keep looking for more information?”
  • “Why should I buy something now?”

We used these three questions to quickly review the copy and design of the new website. Our objective was to have a solid, compelling answer to at least one of the three questions based on the first look at each of the website’s main pages.

Strategic Questions to Improve Design and Copy on a New Website

Website-Tool

We used the three strategic thinking questions on a first pass review of the website. The questions helped us strengthen copy, make decisions on where to place key features, and changed perspectives about whether certain functionality made sense or not.

Our decisions weren’t data-driven because we don’t have any data on the website. The three strategic thinking questions definitely proved to be hard workers, however, for checking whether a brand new website offers compelling reasons for users to engage.

If you’re in a similar situation, grab a copy of this strategic thinking exercise and see how hard it can work for you! – Mike Brown

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“How strong is my organization’s social media strategy?”

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question.

Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social  Strategy.”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Several people in very different settings have asked for presentation tips on making last-minute speeches or moderating panel discussions at events.

My presentation tips in both situations was pretty comparable (although for panel discussions, I could actually point to a Brainzooming article specifically on the topic).

Panel-Short-Notice

Presentation Tips – 4 Ideas for Successful, Last-Minute Speeches

If you have just a few moments to set the stage, get your point across, and get off stage, all with high impact, here are four ideas on how to make that happen:

1. If the speech topic feels off, redirect it to something that works better for you.

You want to be up on stage talking about something that you can relate to well, even if it isn’t exactly what the organizers planned. Look for how you can twist the topic more toward your strengths. If you deliver a great message, no one is going to remember you twisted the topic around a bit.

2. Start your speech with a personal story, and weave the story into a reinforcing pattern.

It’s clear we all love stories. But use a personal story at the start of your talk to its best advantage. Tie the opening story to your bigger message, but consider creating some suspense by not finishing the story. That creates the opportunity to finish or call back to the story at the end of your talk. That’s always a nice touch.

3. In between stories, make a couple of related, memorable points.

When you have only a few minutes to present or set the context for a panel, confine yourself to only a couple of points. Succinctly convey those points, ideally in a way that relates to the story you told to start the presentation.

4. Have a couple of go-to questions at the ready.

If there might be an opportunity for questions after your brief remarks, have a couple of questions that you either plant with audience members or ask and answer yourself. And a few conversation-rich questions are always helpful for a panel moderator.

If you’re a frequent speaker, what presentation tips would you offer for making short, last-minute speeches?

Mike Brown

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It is always fascinating how business professionals approach business networking.

This is particularly true when you get to see how business professionals set themselves apart through smart business networking techniques.

Business Networking Techniques that Created Results

Here are five recent business networking techniques that stood out:

1. When meeting someone new, call attention to your shared networks.

One way to highlight your common network is printing your shared list of LinkedIn connections. This simple business networking technique can move a conversation ahead in positive ways. At a recent meeting, the other individual handed me a hard copy list of shared LinkedIn connections; the list was surprisingly extensive. Scanning it, I discovered a childhood friend who SHOULD be a prospect for the other individual’s service, and I provided background on why he should follow up with my friend.

2. Don’t give up making a meeting happen, even if the introduction is months old.

Several people contacted me right before my wife, Cyndi, had surgery and my availability for non-essential meetings shrank dramatically. One individual followed up four months later before abandoning the possibility of making the meeting happen. His email and phone call combo instigated our in-person meeting months after the initial introduction occurred.

networking-guys

3. Follow up an informal first meeting with a second invitation right away.

At the closing Content Marketing World session, I sat next to someone new. We hit it off, had a wonderful conversation, and identified Pam Didner as a shared contact. Before parting company, he invited me to a dinner he was having with a client. Back at the hotel and planning to head to another event I had already paid to attend, he texted me with specifics on where they were headed. His invitation and follow up turned into a great dinner getting to know him better along with two of his clients.

4. Make your follow-up personal, not formulaic.

After the recent networking event prompting the “you have to keep up your blog current once you start it” post, one person I didn’t get to meet reached out via LinkedIn with more than the standard, “Join my network” message. He recounted leaving the event early to tend to a diabetic pet. Having had a diabetic pet ourselves, his personalized message created an instant connection.

5. Have a good memory (or good notes) of why you met originally met someone.

Right before Cyndi’s surgery, I did squeeze in a networking meeting with someone new instigated by friend and blog reader, Michael Irvin. With everything else on my mind, I remembered it was a great connection, but by the time we reconnected, I could not remember the specifics. The other individual came to our second meeting, however, with detail on why we were meeting again and what we hoped to accomplish. What a great boost to a productive second meeting.

What have you seen work with smart business networking techniques recently?

Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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How big of a deal is creating an innovative workplace culture?

That question opened one of two Brainzooming workshops I facilitated at the Construction Financial Management Association Heartland Conference.

Consider these factoids on the importance of creativity and an innovative workplace culture pulled from various studies:

  • “Creativity is the most important leadership quality, according to CEOs.” IBM Global CEO Study, “The Enterprise of the Future”
  • “Seventy‐eight percent of Millennials were strongly influenced by how innovative a company was when deciding if they wanted to work there.” The Deloitte Millennial Survey, 2014
  • “Employing a worker in a creative occupation is an innovation input in a similar manner to employing a scientist.” The Creative Economy Report, London School of Economics, 2008

Not surprisingly, we also think an innovative workplace culture is a pretty big deal, and we’re glad we’re not alone on that.

Innovative-Workplace-Cultur

7 Keys to Creating an Innovative Workplace Culture

What constitutes an innovative workplace culture, i.e., one where people are able that to readily create fundamental, valuable improvements relative to the status quo?

Here are seven characteristics of innovative workplace cultures. They:

1. Provide Direction

Company leadership points the way and lets team members throughout the organization run with opportunities to innovate.

2. Invite Broad Participation

Diverse participants from varied levels and areas of the company, plus customers, outside experts, and other relevant parties are included in innovation efforts.

3. Meaningfully Engage and Involve Employees

Innovation team members receive training, structure, and access to opportunities that take best advantage of their knowledge and expertise to innovate.

4. Encourage Change

There’s a continual push to challenge past strategies and anticipate what the future holds to increase the value delivered to important audiences.

5. Pursue Smart Possibilities

There are clear processes in place to explore, assess, and prioritize the best innovation opportunities and meaningfully propel the organization forward.

6. Stay Agile

Despite a quickly changing environment, there is a focus on what’s most important for the organization’s success while embracing a willingness to change direction rapidly when necessary.

7. Celebrate Progress and Success

For all the fanfare about celebrating failures, an innovative workplace culture recognizes and celebrates trying and learning, progress and determination, AND success.

What would you add to or subtract from this list based on innovative workplace culture successes you’ve seen?

Mike Brown

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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