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Facing a major goal when seems you have is too few resources CAN BE an incredible inspiration for your organization’s innovation strategy.

I worked with a CMO who would revel in difficult situations where it seemed we had too few resources, negligible support, and slight chances of success. As he’d always remind us, when you have almost no support, you have almost nothing to lose. Because of this, he saw difficult and resource-scarce times as the BEST opportunity for creativity and moving ahead with a bold innovation strategy.

Too Few Resources Can Create Opportunities to Innovate?

That idea sounds ridiculous on the surface, especially if you have plenty of money and support to bring your new innovation strategy to life.

Yet in situations where we had far fewer resources than necessary, we would step up our innovation game with extreme creativity and more ingenious ways to bring big ideas to life.

Based on these experiences, coming up with many possibilities to get things done in novel ways became second nature!

16 Ways to Find New Innovation Resources

Ultimately, exploring many paths for non-traditional resources became a standard procedure. It was so routine, in fact, I developed a battery of questions we could use when launching any project to identify a potential pool of resources to tap. These strategic thinking questions pushed our thinking on potential internal and external partners, strategy changes, places to borrow short cut ideas, and new outreaches for support.

The point behind all the questions was finding ways to accelerate our ability to innovate, turning more ideas into reality to move our business ahead.

We’ve compiled the questions into an eBook called, “Accelerate – 16 Keys to Finding Resources for Your Innovation Strategy,” and you can get your own copy here.

Whether you use the questions individually or with your team, you’ll discover ample new options to work around resource limitations standing in the way of your innovation strategy’s progress! – Mike Brown

 

Find New Resources to Innovate!

NEW FREE Download: 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Is your organization struggling to deliver on the innovation expectations you have for it?

From our experience at The Brainzooming Group and ongoing research, there are ten common innovation barriers blocking new idea and implementation across organizations. Only a couple of these barriers existing in a culture can block even modest expectations for implementing new ideas.

There is good news, however: none of the innovation barriers is insurmountable.

Understanding which challenges you’re facing is vital. That insight drives the smart change management steps needed to navigate each innovation challenge.

10 Innovation Barriers Lurking in Your Organization

We group innovation barriers based on their ties to strategy, process, and people issues.

Innovation-Strategy

Strategy Barriers

  • Lacking an overarching direction
  • Loving the status quo too much
  • Managing with an exclusively short-term focus
  • Using ineffective metrics

Process Barriers

  • Ignoring the need for a structured process
  • Struggling with core capabilities
  • Lacking sufficient resources
  • Operating with a history of unsuccessful innovation implementation

People Barriers

  • Failing to recognize innovative talent
  • Not motivating the team to take risks and innovate

Tackling Innovation Barriers

We use a diagnostic with senior leadership teams that ties to the ten innovation barriers.

Innovation-Room

The first step in the brief strategic thinking exercise has individual leaders assess the presence of the organization’s roadblocks. After leadership team members complete individual assessments,  we collect and analyze the responses as input for a strategic conversation among senior leaders. In that conversation, we:

  • Acknowledge areas of agreement on the presence or absence of specific barriers
  • Discuss reasons where there are different perceptions on innovation barriers
  • Identify, based on the overall scores, whether significant barriers are tied to strategy, process, or people issues

Is Your Organization Struggling with Innovation?

Are you trying to push for new ideas and innovation in your organization, but not finding success?

You need to download our free eBook, “The Ten Big Nos to InNOvating.” It highlights each of the ten innovation barriers and includes the diagnostic we use.

If you want to go deeper in jump starting an innovation strategy, contact us. Let’s talk about the best options to engage your employees for input and innovation!

Are you ready to boost innovation in a high-impact way?

New-10Barriers-Cover-BurstDo you need a quick evaluation to understand your organization’s innovation challenges so you can create a strategy to boost new ideas and successful implementation?

Download “The Ten Big Nos to InNOvating – Identifying the Barriers to Successful Business Innovation.”

This free Brainzooming eBook highlights ten common organizational innovation barriers. A one-page evaluation sets the stage to quickly self-diagnose where to focus your organization’s efforts in customizing a successful innovation initiative.

Download Your FREE eBook! 10 Big NOs to Innovating in Organizations

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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When it comes to whether an organization demonstrates ample creativity and new ideas, you have to place a load of responsibility on the leadership. How the leaders encourage and cultivate new ideas (or don’t) will affect the volume and richness of creativity throughout the organization.

160709-No-Dump-Ideas

If you want to go deeper into our thinking on the topic, here are a variety of articles on how leaders both support and stand in the way of creativity and new ideas.

Leaders Supporting Creativity and New Ideas

Creative Thinking – 7 Keys to How “Idea Magnets” Boost Creativity

Career Challenges – 8 Ways to Let Talented People Help You

The Process of Strategy Planning: 5 Ways to Keep the Boss from Dominating

New Employee Success – 5 Ways to Create Success for New Ideas

Be a Business Fan for Your Work Team Members

Creative Thinking Skills: 6 Tips for Sharing and Receiving Creative Ideas

Unleash Creative Possibilities with Bob Thacker

Extreme Creativity – When Do You Trust a Creative Genius?

Leaders Getting in the Way of Creativity

5 Ideas When an Uber-Positive Boss Crushes Creative Thinking

Protecting Your Creativity in a Culture that Doesn’t Value It

New Business Ideas and a Creative Block in Your Organization

Mike Brown

 

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ebook-cover-redoBoost Your Extreme Creativity with “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation”

Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Contact us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Reviewing the innovation strategy challenges business executives identified when downloading Brainzooming eBooks, they frequently mention gaining “buy-in” for significant change initiatives. That’s no surprise. There are so many ways to botch involving employees (and community members, if that’s your audience) in developing and successfully implementing an innovation strategy.

Here are five keys we’ve found for successfully engaging employees in innovation strategy. Consider it “The Brainzooming Buy-In Manifesto,” written in the voice of your employee or community member.

The Brainzooming Buy-In Manifesto – 5 Keys to Engaging Employees in Innovation Strategy

Employee-Engagement

Ask me to participate

Ask about my aspirations and hope for our organization. Help to me to productively contribute to identifying what we need to do and what it might mean for us. Let me share ideas for how we might be able to accomplish the changes we need to make.

Listen to my ideas

Let me share what I’ve been thinking about or maybe just imagined. Listen as I struggle to put words or images to big ideas that aren’t fully formed. Listen to the ideas you hoped to hear, and keep listening when I share challenging perspectives and ideas that aren’t nearly as comfortable to accept.

Incorporate my ideas in our collective direction

If I’ve shared ideas, I expect to be able to recognize how they shaped what we’re going to do. We may not do everything that I suggested, but I want to be able to see how my participation influenced or shaped the overall view of what we’re going to try to accomplish, and how we’ll make it happen.

Let me know what’s going on

I’ve shared my ideas. I don’t want them to simply go into a big black box and then have to comb through a document or internal announcement later to see what happened after I was involved. Even if I need to return to what I do every day, don’t forget I was part of the team in its earlier stages. We have a legitimate expectation to keep hearing about what’s happening even if my participation is reduced.

Talk in real words

When sharing ideas and information, use familiar language we use within our organization. Don’t hide questionable ideas or intentions in vague or jargon-filled language that obscures meaning and understanding.

That’s the Brainzooming Buy-In Manifesto

If you want engagement and ongoing participation for developing and implementing an innovation strategy, start with these five keys. – Mike Brown

 

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Looking for a Successful Innovation Strategy to Grow Your Business?
Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookBusiness growth can depend on introducing new products and services that resonate more strongly with customers and deliver outstanding value compared to what’s currently available.

Are you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise eBook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE eBook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!





Download Your Free  Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Fake Book




Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’m frequently asked for free advice. You know the whole “can I pick your brain” routine. To which I typically answer, “If you pick my brain, it will never heal.”

In a number of other business and personal situations, I formulate pieces of advice that are either never requested or never volunteered.

7 Pieces of Advice – Only Some of Which I Passed Along

Pick-My-Brain-Advice

Thinking back over recent weeks, there was some decent pieces advice (both for others and for me) that I both passed along and kept to myself without saying anything. Here are seven that come to mind:

  1. Your health is more important than a job. If your job is making you sick, you have to get out as soon as you can.
  2. Don’t send an email when you’re dumping a load of crap in someone’s lap that did nothing to deserve it. Pick up the phone and be an adult about it. And maybe figure out several possible alternatives while you’re at it.
  3. Simple, great ideas might only be great ideas in a vacuum. Once you introduce them into an organization’s culture, that same simple, great idea can create lots of complexity and hassles.
  4. Print the whole report out, single-sided. Then start throwing out pages and rearranging it until it looks like the report you need.
  5. When you read an email that makes you mad or confused initially, close it. Come back to it fifteen minutes later, read it slowly and thoroughly, and see if you have the same sentiments about it.
  6. In many situations, it doesn’t matter who does it, but SOMEBODY has to be in charge.
  7. Today has hardly any impact relative to eternity. Get over it. Things will be fine no matter what it feels like right this minute.

If any of these apply to you, feel free to borrow them – for free. – Mike Brown

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Contact us to learn all about how Mike Brown’s Brainzooming workshops on social media and content marketing can boost your success!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I mentioned in an earlier article how the Gas Can event on June 24, 2016 was “half empty” at best. After the event, I posted on Facebook about how difficult it is, once you’ve produced events, to sit in the audience and not re-produce an event with major production problems.

While writing an article poking holes in the Gas Can program would be easy, however, it wouldn’t have much value for you.

Instead, how about a list of 14 event marketing strategy questions you can use the next time you or your organization plan an event? It’s one way of passing along our conference production experience and lessons to all of you.

14 Event Marketing Strategy Questions You NEED to Ask Early

Gas-Can-Crowd

If you’re planning a conference, ask all of these questions in plenty of time to do something about them!

  1. Have you seen the speakers you’re putting on stage?
  2. If you haven’t seen all of the speakers, have you at least seen some of them to know where to place the strongest speakers?
  3. For the speakers you haven’t seen, do you have an idea of what they are planning to speak about so you can arrange them in a way that there is continuity (and not a violent and uncomfortable swing in tone and subject) between each segment?
  4. To boost networking, have you designed name tags so peoples’ names and companies are bigger than the event name (since people know where they are, but don’t necessarily know other people)?
  5. Have you planned to start the event with your second biggest moment?
  6. Have you planned to end the event with your biggest moment (especially if you’re planning a next event in this series of events)?
  7. Have you made it easy for attendees to create and share social media content about the event?
  8. If you’re attempting to create a legitimately curated event (meaning you are deliberately challenging the audience’s patience and tolerance for variety in disparate segments), have you figured out how to provide a few cues to tie the pieces together so attendees don’t walk away feeling as if the program was a random jumble?
  9. Have you scheduled a rehearsal and made sure you’re absolutely confident with what and how every speaker is going to do (and whether every presenter should still be on the agenda)?
  10. Have you made sure you have a monitor in the front of the stage so presenters don’t have to keep turning away from the audience to see what the current slide is?
  11. Have you satisfied yourself that presenters have strong enough diction, volume, and speaking styles so the audience will be able to understand what they are saying throughout their presentations?
  12. Have you tested the sound system well in advance and made sure it will work for all the elements of your program?
  13. Do you have someone knowledgeable about the sound system and the venue running the sound?
  14. Is the stage lit properly so the audience can see (and photograph for social sharing) both the presenter and the slides

Yes, you need to be able to answer “Yes” to all these event marketing strategy questions. – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Following our post on the tenth anniversary of the Brainzooming strategic planning methodology, the guys at Armada Corporate Intelligence, who were an important part of developing and testing the process, wrote a companion article. They highlighted 5 keys to streamlining strategic planning based on how we implemented the Brainzooming process as a contrast to traditional (and slow) strategic planning techniques.

In an edited excerpt, here is what they shared in their Inside the Executive Suite column about streamlining strategic planning.

5 Keys to Streamlining Strategic Planning

Planning-Meeting

Most executives can’t write a strategy plan, so don’t make them

We hit this challenge repeatedly. Executives that SHOULD know how to develop and write a strategic plan struggled. Since strategy planning is an infrequent activity, it is difficult for executives to master it. We learned that if we asked executives a series of questions leading to the information needed to complete a strategy plan,  they became productive strategy planners.

Strategy Implication: Remove the tedious aspects of strategy planning, replacing them with efficient alternative approaches. This implies focusing participants on contributing in ways that they can be most productive.

The number and types of participants are critical to developing a strong plan

A marketing manager is generally the expert on a particular product line. That doesn’t mean, however, it works best for him or her to close the door and spend weeks trying to write a marketing plan individually. To compress the time spent planning, we assembled multiple people with important, yet perhaps more narrow perspectives on a product line, to participate. The collaborative approach created more thorough and vetted plans. Involving more people turned weeks of solo work into a one-day collaboration to prepare a strategy plan.

Strategy Implication: Adding more people is only part of the equation. The right mix of participants must include three perspectives: front-line people, functional experts (i.e., finance, operations, market research), and innovators (people that look at business situations differently). This combination, typically accomplished with five-to-ten people, leads to a stronger strategy.

A strategy plan should be integral to daily business activities

One problem with strategic planning is it often seems completely separate from other activities. The plan includes big ideas, statements, and expectations beyond anything an organization will ever do. It summarizes the strategy in jargon foreign to daily business conversations. We instead developed a process built around facilitating conversations among people with a big stake in company performance. This leads to a realistic focus on implementing what matters for business success within the plan.

Strategy Implication: By building strategy planning around collaborative conversations, the plan input sounds just like how people in the organization talk. The ideas incorporated into the plan also come from within the organization and aren’t dropped into it by (an ultimately) disinterested outsider. It speeds understanding, acceptance, and rapid implementation of a strategic viewpoint and plan.

Creative thinking exercises generate ideas, not facts

We adapted the strategy planning process to develop major account sales plans. This switch supported a program aligning sales activities for the company’s largest accounts. Despite similarities, a sales planning workshop’s success depended tremendously on how knowledgeable the sales participants were. While creative thinking exercises help generate new ideas, it became clear that creativity couldn’t help a salesperson without key facts (e.g., knowing the decision maker) generate answers.

Strategy Implication: Document as many needed facts as possible BEFORE assembling a group to collaborate on plan building. Use online surveys, focused fact-finding exploration, and pre-session homework to establish basic information. This is vital since nothing shuts down a planning session as quickly as the absence of key facts no one can credibly address.

There are multiple ways to complete a strategy plan

With an internal department driving the rapid planning approach we used, there was no built-in bias to require a complex set of planning steps. Everyone benefitted by simplifying the process as much as possible. In fact, our approach was to use everything the internal client had already completed that would move planning ahead more quickly. Instead of using a static process requiring internal clients to adapt, our process adapted to what worked best for the internal clients and the business.

Strategy Implication: There are many ways to develop and complete a strategy plan. The overall steps are basically the same for a corporate strategy, a marketing plan, or a functional area’s priority setting. Recognizing that, there is significant flexibility to vary planning steps to accommodate an organization’s ability to develop and execute a strategy. For the sake of efficiency, we did insist in every case that we would time-constrain planning activities and manage conversations to keep things out of the weeds. This ensured everything we did was adding new insights and material to complete the final plan. – Armada Corporate Intelligence

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Find New Resources to Innovate!

NEW FREE Download: 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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