Performance | The Brainzooming Group - Part 3 – page 3
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We have a call with a client about an upcoming Brainzooming innovation workshop. One question (which we think MAY have been included by mistake on the list of topics they sent us) is what we do when energy is diminishing during a workshop.

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Seeing the question about how to boost an audience’s energy level ahead of time (and knowing they’ll want specifics), prompted this list of thirty things I’ve done during my career of designing and delivering interactive presentations and workshops.

Perhaps the most important way to boost an audience’s energy level is number thirty: we make every attempt to design any Brainzooming workshop to re-energize the group throughout the time together. In that way, we plan for doing the best mix of activities in 1 through 29 to keep the energy levels up throughout the workshop!

  1. Tell funny stories
  2. Use self-deprecating humor
  3. Be very silent (uncomfortably silent) until the audience notices and re-engages
  4. Present while walking throughout the room / audience
  5. Stand on a chair and present
  6. Do more activities where everyone must play an active role
  7. Move to the Shrimp creative thinking exercise
  8. Ask questions of the audience
  9. Take a seat at a table and start voicing a person’s internal thoughts about the presentation
  10. Have everyone stand up and stretch
  11. Have everyone stand up and scream (or jump around)
  12. Make the audience the stars of the show
  13. Start doing improv with the audience
  14. Take a break and let everyone refresh
  15. Rearrange things at the break so they return to a new room
  16. Invite someone else to tell a story to the group
  17. Go to the quiet part of the room and present from there
  18. Run around the room (or at least down an aisle) to increase your own energy
  19. Introduce an ice breaker exercise – even in the middle of the presentation (and do funny riffs on peoples’ answers)
  20. Get people to talk and then have fun with them
  21. Call on the people I met before the presentation
  22. Call on someone that is making faces
  23. Call on the person with bright eyes and engage with them
  24. Create a contest right on the spot and give a pair of orange I am Creative socks to the winner
  25. Have people change something to freshen up what has already become familiar, comfortable, and routine (even within this temporary group)
  26. Move people from one table or group to another
  27. Take everyone outside
  28. Speed things up
  29. Use an exercise where everyone can participate simultaneously
  30. Pre-plan (by watching the experience in my mind) so the audience won’t enter a low-energy state

Need a strategy, creativity, innovation or other learning and motivational boost for your audience?

Contact us, and let’s figure out the right topics, format, and activities to design and deliver an interactive presentation or workshop to energize your team during the workshop and beyond! – Mike Brown

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(Adapted from Inside the Executive Suite by Armada Corporate Intelligence)

Two junior team members in chief of staff / program manager roles asked how to best align with senior leaders to successfully share a strategy across an organization. Each was concerned about having enough regular access to senior leaders to feel comfortable in delivering consistent communications relative to what they would be saying in other forums. The challenge is doing more than just sending out a plan and expecting people to naturally understand the organization’s direction.

The Way to Successfully Share a Strategy

What can a senior leader do to share personal perspectives and expectations to facilitate stronger strategy implementation in an organization?

We recommend that an executive team develop its own strategy brief to support better, more aligned communication, and ultimately, strategy implementation. Borrowed from the idea of a communications brief, a strategy brief will:

  • Prompt greater strategic clarity and expectation setting
  • Help team members who are working on communicating and implementing the plan to perform effectively and creatively
  • Facilitate objectivity when judging the effectiveness and success of early strategy implementation

The strategy implementation brief contains three types of information:

  • Objectives – Detailing where the strategy should lead the organization, who it will impact, and what beliefs and action will be most important to success.
  • Preferences – Shares what messages, messaging styles, timing, and reinforcements pave the way for greater alignment.
  • Guidelines – Laying out what the strategy communication and implementation team needs to incorporate and avoid.

Within that framework, here are the questions to answer so your team can most effectively represent senior leadership to the entire organization.

Objectives

  • What is on the short list of initiatives that will move the organization forward?

Answering this question is step one in getting your strategic plan down to a bite-sized aspiration. Of all the initiatives you have planned, which handful are you, as a senior executive, going to monitor most closely? Your answer will determine whether you are going to move the needle or not.

  • What are your beliefs about the organization’s current situation? What do you think the broader organization’s beliefs are about the current situation? How do they need to change?

These questions begin addressing the arc of change you expect the organization to embrace. Is change critical to taking advantage of opportunities? Is a dramatically different direction needed to ward off challenges, but only after you overcome organizational complacency? Importantly, does the broad employee base see the organization’s situation comparably to the senior team? If not, orient the change communication toward what will make sense to THEM.

  • How do you expect the organization to think, behave, and perform differently with successful implementation?

Don’t spell out dozens of things you need employees to address so you can affect the desired strategic changes. Push your executive team to spell out five or fewer thinking and performance changes you are looking for from the organization. Pick only ones that will make a noticeable difference in results.

Preferences

  • What are the most important messages to convey and reinforce?

Identify the short list of messages most important for each target audience. Then do whatever homework you can do to see how those messages will resonate with your audiences. Far better to talk to audiences in ways that resonate with them versus ways that make sense to the senior executives.

  • What are the rallying points you will personally use to build momentum? How consistent do you expect to be in your own communication and messaging?

Share the talking points you expect will work best for you when you are interacting personally with audience members. Spell out how comfortable and confident you are in staying consistent with your messages. If you expect to shift them or are prone to get swept up in the moment and venture into new territory, let your team know to check back frequently for updates.

  • What emotions are relevant and okay to leverage to increase communication receptiveness?

Even if you’re data-driven and uncomfortable with emotional appeals, they do play an important role in business communication. Lay the groundwork for integrating appropriate emotions to move hearts in addition to minds.

Guidelines

  • Where are you looking for the team and others closer to the broader employee base to exercise their own creativity?

Once you’ve provided the foundation for your implementation team, let them know where they have room to bring their own ideas and variations to your thinking. Don’t expect them to be order takers, simply carrying out everything you dictate. Give yourself the advantage of tapping into the team’s expertise.

  • What touch points and feedback do you want from the implementation team?

This goes along with the previous direction. Share how involved and active you expect to be with the team. Make sure everyone understands how much latitude they have to act vs. circling back to the executive team for frequent check-ins.

  • What adjustments are you prepared to make if things seem off track?

Knowing your commitment level to the current direction helps the team plan for appropriate levels of change. Have you chosen an unwavering path, or are you experimenting your way into a new strategy, expecting to learn and adapt for the foreseeable future?

To Successfully Share a Strategy, Don’t Keep Your Implementation Team in the Dark

While it’s hardly statistically projectable, the two individuals asking how to align with senior leader messaging are likely voicing the sentiment of junior team members on the hook to implement your senior-level strategies. That’s why a strategic implementation brief is valuable for paving the way for an organization’s successful strategy implementation. – Mike Brown

 

fun-ideas-strategic-planning11 Ideas to Make a Strategic Planning Process More Fun!

Yes, strategic planning can be fun . . . if you know the right ways to liven it up while still developing solid strategies! If you’re intrigued by the possibilities, download our FREE eBook, “11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning.”

Download Your FREE eBook! 11 Fun Ideas for Strategic Planning

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I was talking with an executive about the dramatic changes going on in her organization. Everything is maxed out: expectations, pressure, stress, timelines. The whole nine.

In the midst of it, two leaders who experienced a serious professional rift a number of years ago are simultaneously thrust into the center of today’s crisis. They are readjusting their roles, as they’re now required to always be on the same page publicly. They also have to have a keen sense of what the other one is thinking, saying, and doing.

Hearing this, I wondered aloud: will today’s crisis heal the professional rift and reset the relationship?

via Shutterstock

I’ve experienced the impact of using a crisis to push forward with change. I’ve experienced the team-building and affiliating impacts of a group of professionals banding together to accomplish a major initiative. I hadn’t put the two together to think about embracing a crisis situation to reset a professional relationship.

Which prompts me to wonder: when today’s crisis emerges, what is the potential impact of reaching out to people that you aren’t as close to anymore? What are the potential benefits to involving them in facing a common, critical challenge? When you let a professional crisis go by without doing so, what is the missed opportunity?  – Mike Brown

 

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Facing Innovation Barriers? Here Is Help!

Innovation-Strategy-eBooks

Are you facing organizational innovation barriers related to:

We have free Brainzooming eBooks for you to help navigate barriers and boost innovation!

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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People still ask if I miss working for a Fortune 500 company. I tell them the only times I do are on the 15th and 31st of the month.

That line always gets a laugh.

When you are in an entrepreneurial venture, the paydays aren’t on a predictable schedule. Yet, since The Brainzooming Group works with many major corporations, it’s not like I don’t retain a sense of the upsides and challenges of working in the corporate world.

For today, at least, it is great to be out of the corporate world.

That sentiment all revolves around our content marketing strategy.

The client we’re onsite with today working on an innovation strategy comes with an intriguing history.

Our primary contact saw me speak in 2014 at Compete Through Service Symposium produced by the Arizona State University Center for Services Leadership and subscribed to the Brainzooming blog email. At the company he was at, there was no opportunity to work with us.

He changed jobs early in 2017 and re-subscribed to the blog with his new company’s email address. By mid-year, he completed a Contact Us form on the website, wanting to discuss his brand’s innovation strategy. Coincidentally, we were headed to his city the next Monday to host another client’s annual customer forum. We arranged a meeting and subsequently developed a scope of work. It changed a few times as he worked to sell-in the initiative. Several months later, the deal seemed in question, but we got an opportunity to do a 30-minute phone conference with the company president to address his questions. That led to another spin on the scope of work.

Right after 2018 started, they signed the scope of work to begin. Following an online input survey with both internal team members and external partners, three of us are onsite TODAY for a full-day innovation strategy and new product development workshop.

So, why does this story make me glad I’m not in the corporate world anymore?

It’s because I can’t fathom trying to assign credit for this deal if it unfolded in a Fortune 500 company:

  • The relationship started multiple years ago through a speaking engagement.
  • The only client contact for nearly three years was the blog email and an eBook download.
  • Once we moved into active business development mode, three of us participated in developing the scope of work.
  • I led the call that moved us toward winning the business.
  • Four of us contributed toward creating the Brainzooming experience we’ll deliver today.

In a Fortune 500 company, this could lead to a huge tug-of-war for credit.

In an entrepreneurial venture, we can talk through the best approach to assign credit that equitable for everyone without needing a system to track and allocate effort.

Here’s to a wonderful, productive, and beneficial workshop with our new client, and our hope that it leads to a long relationship. And even better, as we move forward, here’s to nobody even remembering exactly did what to win it. – Mike Brown

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Looking for Brand Innovation to Grow Your Business? Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookAre you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise ebook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE ebook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We were facilitating report outs at a strategy planning workshop after multiple teams tackled developing high-level plans to improve various employee challenges in a relatively high-performing company. Chuck Dymer, who was co-facilitating the client workshop with me, remarked at the depth and importance of several of the report outs and the conversations they sparked.

Why were these report outs different than others we’d done previously?

Four of the five report outs in this strategy planning workshop were delivered by female leaders in the organization.

Rather than looking at the report outs as perfunctory assignments, the female leaders used the platform to share hopes, concerns, frustrations, and possibilities important to them and to the organization. And once they did, the men in the group jumped in to these powerful conversations.

If you’re in charge of a company or a significant business unit or department, are you actively managing gender diversity? Are you making sure women are in leadership positions where they can voice things that need to be said that male leaders are unwilling to say?

These questions are real.

And for the too many client strategy planning workshops we facilitate (especially in business-to-business settings) where all the participants are male, these questions about female leaders are of supreme importance.

What are your answers to the questions, and what are you doing to improve the situation right away? – Mike Brown

 

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Facing Innovation Barriers? Here Is Help!

Innovation-Strategy-eBooks

Are you facing organizational innovation barriers related to:

We have free Brainzooming eBooks for you to help navigate barriers and boost innovation!

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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An article in The Wall Street Journal by Paul Ziobro shares an report on how toy manufacturers, including Mattel and Hasbro, are accelerating their new product innovation processes. The brands want to capitalize on market growth stemming from toys tied to popular social media themes. These trends, as one industry insider put it, “burn really bright and really short,” necessitating abbreviating product development cycles from several years to months, or even weeks. Thus, the need to catalyze innovative success by streamlining the steps between ideas and implementation.

2 Super Smart Ways to Catalyze Innovative Success

Let’s review two of critical success factors toy manufacturers are embracing that are of value, if your brand also wants to speed up its innovation pace.

1. Listening to the Market in Multiple Ways

From just the few toy industry innovation stories reported in the WSJ, you see multiples ways of incorporating broad and early market perceptions to shape innovation:

  • Social Media Listening
    Portland-based organization Zing employs three people to monitor social media for popular topics with the potential to inspire successful toys. During June 2016, they noticed people in Greece using beads as a toy for nervous fidgeting. That holiday season, it released Thumb Chucks, its own version of the beads.
  • Observing Behavior
    Online video platforms provide new ways to observe customer behaviors and perceptions beyond formal research studies. Hasbro has released multiple toys based on viral video trends, including bottle flipping and people wearing dental mouth guards as they try to pronounce complicated words.
  • Point-of-Sale Analytics Trends
    LaRose Industries saw Walmart sales of its Cra-Z-Art glue increase over 50% monthly in the fall of 2016. Investigation showed that kids were creating slime (a gooey, fun concoction popularized on the Nickelodeon TV network) by mixing the glue with other household products. LaRose jumped on the growth trend, introducing slime-making kits in January 2017.
  • Securing Early Commitments
    Before producing the slime-making kits, LaRose Industries paired with Nickelodeon to license the slime name and identity, boosting potential customer awareness immediately. It also secured interest from retailers at the January toy show. It only then moved into manufacturing, reaching stores within 45 days.

Beyond these possibilities, what else can your brand explore to expand its repertoire of market listening strategies?

  • Directly Observing Customers
    Whether in business or consumer markets, how can you secure cooperation from your customers to observe them in their work or home settings, using your products and others? This is a fruitful way to identify innovation opportunities customers can’t clearly articulate.
  • Involve Customer-Facing Employees
    Instead of confining new product innovation to employees working in corporate offices, directly involve sales, customer service, and other employees who routinely interact with customers. They are a rich source of customer insights and feedback.

2. Exploiting Small and Nimble to Catalyze Innovative Success

Another theme from the toy industry stories is taking advantage of smallness – in team sizes, budgets, and development windows – coupled with sizable impact expectations:

  • Hasbro
    It has created a Quick Strike team to push new product innovation stemming from popular social media topics and memes. The team has released new products in as few as 11 weeks. The manufacturer is migrating the approach into its overall organization.
  • Mattel
    The team deployed to develop social-trend based toys at Mattel is made up of ten people. The company’s CEO reports having given the team very little budget and only three months to have toy ideas ready for last January’s toy fair. The toys are scheduled to reach stores later in 2018.

Restricting resources and keeping big innovation demands in place can seem counter-intuitive. The strategy is consistent, though, with other case studies of major brands creating small, separate incubators to rapidly develop new ideas. Consider these points when developing a comparable strategy to boost nimbleness and speed:

  • First Plan the Team around Capabilities
    Rather than starting team selection with an org chart, identify the talents, capabilities, and functions the team needs. Only then start looking for the right people. Set a goal of maximizing the talent pool with as few people as possible. More people provide more ways to slow down decisions and progress.
  • Push for Self-Sufficiency
    A corporate intrapreneurial leader in the cosmetics industry cautions innovation teams to develop their own solutions rather than reaching back into their main organizations. Her experience was that parent organization answers carry time, complications, and overhead that a rapid development team can’t tolerate.
  • Streamline Decision Making
    Identify upfront the team’s parameters to keep moving forward without seeking review and approvals. As you remove typical decisions steps, make sure to enforce this simplified process throughout the development cycle. Otherwise, the parent organization may work overtime to slow down ideas it hasn’t vetted in the typical fashion.

What Else Do You Need?

These examples can get you thinking about new ways to streamline innovation. If you want to go deeper, the Accelerate eBook covers sixteen keys for finding resources to accelerate your innovation strategy. Get your copy today!Adapted from Inside the Executive Suite

 

Find New Resources to Innovate!

FREE Download: 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’m involved with a new outreach effort at church. Our objective is connecting with people that have left the Catholic Church or those that have expressed an interest in joining. Another thing our pastor asked us to implement is going door-to-door throughout the parish boundaries to reach out to everyone in the area.

I know I speak for myself and the other committee members: none of us were very excited about engaging in door-to-door ministry. We don’t want to seem like people from one of THOSE churches where we ALL hide when the doorbell rings.

Researching Catholic outreach ministries, I found a prominent one with a palatable strategy for door-to-door outreach. It recommends focusing exclusively on asking people if they have anything that your church can pray about for them. Whether it’s a challenge, aspiration, or nagging concern, the idea is simply to let people know that others care and want to join them in praying about what is on their minds.

Then a few weeks ago, a priest from a Catholic young adult ministry visited our parish. I was there early and helped pass out the pamphlets he brought with him. I placed them in the pews without even looking at them, figuring they solicited contributions. Only later, during his homily, did I learn that the return portion of the brochures had nothing to do with a request for money. It asked everyone to share prayer requests we had so that the young adults in the ministry could join with us in prayer.

How do you follow up within your brand’s business development strategy?

via Shutterstock

Against this backdrop, I was recently working on a business development strategy for a business when the idea clicked. Rather than reaching out to prospects to talk about what the firm does, they could reach out to business decision makers interested in the company and ask them for their version of a prayer request.

For this brand, some comparable prayer request ideas might include:

  • Asking what questions they have and providing an answer then or in a follow-up.
  • Offering a free consultation call to solve a challenge.
  • Providing access to an exclusive webpage or group with resources to help them do their jobs.

If you applied a comparable business development strategy for following up with your prospects, what would be YOUR brand’s version of a soliciting a prayer request? – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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