Innovation | The Brainzooming Group - Part 4 – page 4
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We facilitated a two-day innovation strategy workshop for nearly two hundred members of a prominent, long-established brand’s marketing organization. The innovation strategy workshop covered a variety of topics related to disruptive innovation.

Prior to our Brainzooming workshop, a tech speaker addressed external innovation opportunities and challenges facing the brand. After his talk, the audience posed multiple questions to get to more actionable details. One person asked him what would keep him up at night if he were a leader at their company. While our workshop hadn’t started yet, I immediately wrote one word on a sheet of paper to answer the audience question. I handed the paper to my Brainzooming co-facilitator, Emma Alvarez Gibson:

If I were at the company, except would keep me up at night. EVERY night.

The reason?

Our client’s leaders, unconstrained by anything else, know the types of disruptive innovation moves they should make. The brand has tech-centric, disruptive competitors surfacing. Related product and lifestyle categories are innovating in ways that will allow them to bundle their own version of our client’s products into theirs. Major data aggregators, including any company gathering GPS and other user behavior data, could make a move into our client’s space with compelling new offerings.

Yes, they likely know what and how they could employ disruptive innovation.

That’s where except appears to mess things up in strategic ways.

An article I found about the brand’s current innovation strategy initiatives included company executives highlighting a variety of new and exciting changes, EXCEPT they wouldn’t innovate away their sales model.

Before the workshop, conversations with attendees focused on the importance the brand is placing on disruptive innovation, EXCEPT they can’t mess up their current business model and revenue stream.

During the innovation workshop, participants used our Brainzooming tools and models to imagine and develop nearly two-dozen innovation strategy concepts. EXCEPT, the judges didn’t pick the one focused on giving away what they do for free to their clients in exchange for those same clients handing over all their data. That was one concept that seemed, at least to us, like a sure thing that SOME disruptive player will do.

In all of these cases, the company is taking options off the table, EXCEPT that NONE of its potentially-disruptive competitors are removing comparable options from their attack strategies.

See, what I mean?

While I understand the reluctance, EXCEPT means that our client is going to market with numerous restrictions that completely-different looking brands that are targeting them would never consider as limitations.

That’s why except would keep me from getting ANY sleep.  – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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This is a new slide for a two-day innovation strategy workshop we’ll be presenting this week in Los Angeles. While the slide is new, the appearance of all of these excuses (and more) for not advancing with an innovation strategy are anything but new. When we work with clients to expand their innovation initiatives, these reasons for why their innovation strategies haven’t made progress yet quickly emerge. As another slide in the workshop states: Thinking about innovation isn’t easy, but it’s easier than doing something about it!

If these excuses (or the idea of struggling to get an innovation strategy going and producing results) sound familiar in your organization, you need to complete a quick, ten-question analysis to determine how your innovation strategy stacks up. This brand new innovation diagnostic will process your answers and deliver an innovation strategy recommendation tailored to your organization.

Struggling with innovation? Or think you have innovation all figured out? Either way, complete the diagnostic and discover where your best opportunities to increase innovation and growth. – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We have a call with a client about an upcoming Brainzooming innovation workshop. One question (which we think MAY have been included by mistake on the list of topics they sent us) is what we do when energy is diminishing during a workshop.

Photo via Shutterstock

Seeing the question about how to boost an audience’s energy level ahead of time (and knowing they’ll want specifics), prompted this list of thirty things I’ve done during my career of designing and delivering interactive presentations and workshops.

Perhaps the most important way to boost an audience’s energy level is number thirty: we make every attempt to design any Brainzooming workshop to re-energize the group throughout the time together. In that way, we plan for doing the best mix of activities in 1 through 29 to keep the energy levels up throughout the workshop!

  1. Tell funny stories
  2. Use self-deprecating humor
  3. Be very silent (uncomfortably silent) until the audience notices and re-engages
  4. Present while walking throughout the room / audience
  5. Stand on a chair and present
  6. Do more activities where everyone must play an active role
  7. Move to the Shrimp creative thinking exercise
  8. Ask questions of the audience
  9. Take a seat at a table and start voicing a person’s internal thoughts about the presentation
  10. Have everyone stand up and stretch
  11. Have everyone stand up and scream (or jump around)
  12. Make the audience the stars of the show
  13. Start doing improv with the audience
  14. Take a break and let everyone refresh
  15. Rearrange things at the break so they return to a new room
  16. Invite someone else to tell a story to the group
  17. Go to the quiet part of the room and present from there
  18. Run around the room (or at least down an aisle) to increase your own energy
  19. Introduce an ice breaker exercise – even in the middle of the presentation (and do funny riffs on peoples’ answers)
  20. Get people to talk and then have fun with them
  21. Call on the people I met before the presentation
  22. Call on someone that is making faces
  23. Call on the person with bright eyes and engage with them
  24. Create a contest right on the spot and give a pair of orange I am Creative socks to the winner
  25. Have people change something to freshen up what has already become familiar, comfortable, and routine (even within this temporary group)
  26. Move people from one table or group to another
  27. Take everyone outside
  28. Speed things up
  29. Use an exercise where everyone can participate simultaneously
  30. Pre-plan (by watching the experience in my mind) so the audience won’t enter a low-energy state

Need a strategy, creativity, innovation or other learning and motivational boost for your audience?

Contact us, and let’s figure out the right topics, format, and activities to design and deliver an interactive presentation or workshop to energize your team during the workshop and beyond! – Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We were working with a client’s C-level team to develop its strategic plan. To help them articulate the organization’s strategic direction, we used several branding exercises. These branding exercises focused on identifying:

The combination of branding exercises effectively identified new language to describe its strategic direction and supporting strategies.

During the exercises and conversations to develop its big strategy statement, we discussed the role that expertise plays in the organization’s brand. Because expertise is central to the organization’s products, it has only considered a very strict definition for the attribute. That can be okay, but in a fast-changing market, ensuring everything is 100% proven slows solutions customers need. It also allows new, more nimble competitors to set the ground rules for important product features.

When we questioned the narrow use of expertise, they played back the attributes on the left as the defining characteristics for what expertise means.

We then added all the attributes on the right.

Our point was that the organization’s unquestioned expertise allows it to extend this attribute to work harder. Expertise COULD involve exploration and prototyping, where customers actively test and help develop new solutions. It’s unlikely that any long-term customer invited to test a product in development would see a potential glitch as evidence that the brand lacks expertise.

One meeting participant said this type of strategic thinking was a breakthrough for them. It opens up a whole new array of potential options.

Is your organization laboring under similarly narrow perspectives about your brand attributes?

If that seems to be the case, rethink your narrow definitions of brand attributes. Look at your brand attributes as platforms to innovate, expand, and introduce broader meanings that deliver greater value for your customers.

Or better yet, contact us, and let The Brainzooming Group take you through the business and brand strategy exercises to open your organization to a wide variety of growth opportunities!  – Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Is your business-to-business brand looking for new product ideas, stronger innovation strategy opportunities, and a bigger impact?

If so, look for ways to shape the customer experience of your product’s end users.

That doesn’t mean the intermediaries your organization may view as its customers: the distributors, wholesalers, or others that sell or bundle your product. Look to the customer experience as delivered to actual organizations and/or individuals that are USING your product on a daily basis.

What do you know about the people who are touching, interacting with, and determining whether your product makes their days better or worse? (Or perhaps your product is so seamless or invisible that it doesn’t even register with them.)

You know those people are out there, but how much time do you devote to thinking about the impact your product has on them?

If it’s slim to none, it’s time to dramatically increase the amount of consideration you give to end users – right away!

We took that approach when developing an innovation strategy workshop for a B2B manufacturer. While the organization has extensive insights into its intermediaries, we oriented many of the innovation strategy exercises toward the ways the people using their product experience (or don’t) what the company manufactures. One participant noted at the end of the workshop that focusing on the experience was new and valuable for them when it came to identifying new opportunities.

If you’re in the same situation, look to the individuals that are the last ones to interact with your product. How can you orient your innovation strategy to the experiences THEY have? – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

Need a Stronger Innovation Strategy to Grow Your Brand? Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookAre you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise ebook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation strategy profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE ebook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!


Download Your Free Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking eBook

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Sometimes, we get to design a creative thinking exercise that seems like so much fun during its development that it causes me to continually smile and giggle.

We have a new one of those that we debuted yesterday.

In its new form, it’s called Surf-to-Turf. It combines the Shrimp creative thinking exercise, the ultra-popular-at-Brainzooming mad face emoji, the extreme creativity and celebratory slogan (“Winner, winner chicken dinner”) of Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives, and one of our favorite products: orange, “I Am Creative,” notes to self socks.

All that in the poster shown here.

How can you see all those mad emoji faces and NOT giggle?

This design came about specifically for this client. Our objective was to provide the innovation strategy workshop participants a chance to vary their activities, work with new people, self-manage their performance on a creative thinking exercise, and have a chance to win a prize (the orange socks).

Do you like the idea of working with a partner that designs what it does all around what makes sense for your brand and the innovators you have on your team?

If you do, then contact us. Let’s figure out how we can customize and develop the right strategic thinking and creativity tools to make you giggle, smile, and come up with winning strategies! – Mike Brown

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Interested in disrupting thinking in your organization to boost innovation? Click below and download the FREE Disrupting Thinking eBook.

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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People still ask if I miss working for a Fortune 500 company. I tell them the only times I do are on the 15th and 31st of the month.

That line always gets a laugh.

When you are in an entrepreneurial venture, the paydays aren’t on a predictable schedule. Yet, since The Brainzooming Group works with many major corporations, it’s not like I don’t retain a sense of the upsides and challenges of working in the corporate world.

For today, at least, it is great to be out of the corporate world.

That sentiment all revolves around our content marketing strategy.

The client we’re onsite with today working on an innovation strategy comes with an intriguing history.

Our primary contact saw me speak in 2014 at Compete Through Service Symposium produced by the Arizona State University Center for Services Leadership and subscribed to the Brainzooming blog email. At the company he was at, there was no opportunity to work with us.

He changed jobs early in 2017 and re-subscribed to the blog with his new company’s email address. By mid-year, he completed a Contact Us form on the website, wanting to discuss his brand’s innovation strategy. Coincidentally, we were headed to his city the next Monday to host another client’s annual customer forum. We arranged a meeting and subsequently developed a scope of work. It changed a few times as he worked to sell-in the initiative. Several months later, the deal seemed in question, but we got an opportunity to do a 30-minute phone conference with the company president to address his questions. That led to another spin on the scope of work.

Right after 2018 started, they signed the scope of work to begin. Following an online input survey with both internal team members and external partners, three of us are onsite TODAY for a full-day innovation strategy and new product development workshop.

So, why does this story make me glad I’m not in the corporate world anymore?

It’s because I can’t fathom trying to assign credit for this deal if it unfolded in a Fortune 500 company:

  • The relationship started multiple years ago through a speaking engagement.
  • The only client contact for nearly three years was the blog email and an eBook download.
  • Once we moved into active business development mode, three of us participated in developing the scope of work.
  • I led the call that moved us toward winning the business.
  • Four of us contributed toward creating the Brainzooming experience we’ll deliver today.

In a Fortune 500 company, this could lead to a huge tug-of-war for credit.

In an entrepreneurial venture, we can talk through the best approach to assign credit that equitable for everyone without needing a system to track and allocate effort.

Here’s to a wonderful, productive, and beneficial workshop with our new client, and our hope that it leads to a long relationship. And even better, as we move forward, here’s to nobody even remembering exactly did what to win it. – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

Looking for Brand Innovation to Grow Your Business? Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookAre you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise ebook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE ebook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!

Download Your Free Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking eBook

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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