0

Applause is a wonderful part of any conference event. Applause makes the speakers feel better. Applause signals the attendees are enjoying the event. Applause keeps things lively.

None of that means applause always happens spontaneously, however.

How many conference events have you been to where speakers start or finish with no applause?

I’ve been to plenty.

Sometimes there’s no applause because of the audience. Often, though, it’s because event organizers aren’t actively enabling applause as part of the event strategy.

5 Event Strategy Ideas for Generating Applause When You Need It

Want to make sure your event strategy maximizes its applause opportunities? Here are five ideas for doing the most with applause at your event, whether it’s a big conference or a small association luncheon or dinner.

Applause

1. Identify upfront where you want applause.

It’s easy to know you want applause when someone takes or leaves the stage. What are other places where you want applause? After videos? Following a certain big statement a speaker makes? When the event ends and people are prone to wander off? Create a list of all the places where applause will pump up the program and make it part of your event strategy.

2. Make sure there is always an applause starter in the audience.

This Individual (or potentially multiple individuals), is stationed off to the side in an inconspicuous spot. Your applause starter will do what the title suggests. This person is ready to start applauding at every point you want applause. Hand the applause starter the list you’ve developed, brief them on what will be happening throughout the event, and turn the applause starter loose to applaud in all the right places. The great thing an applause starter (trust me on this) is the audience will join in and readily applaud once someone takes the lead.

3. Invite the audience to applaud.

This may seem crass, but it needn’t be. When writing intros for speakers, add a line that says, “Please welcome,” “Help me welcome,” or “Let’s have a warm welcome for our speaker.” A line as simple as that along with the person doing the introducing actually starting light applause will ensure there is applause for a new speaker.

4. Keep presenters close to the stage.

It’s awkward when a speaker takes the stage from so far away that the audience’s applause dies long before the speaker arrives on stage. Position speakers close to the stage so they get where they need to be before the applause ends. If need be, make sure your speakers understand to move quickly and can reap all the benefits of the applause you are instigating for them.

5. If you’re a speaker, pause at your applause line.

Some speakers deliver applause lines (big messages that elicit audience affirmation) right and left. Other speakers do it occasionally. Either way, an effective applause line should be followed by a hard stop and a sufficient pause to allow the audience time to respond. If you’re a speaker who only occasionally has applause lines, take an applause line-type pause at other points in your presentation. With this, your real applause line pause doesn’t appear to be too needy. You may also want to arrange your own personal applause starter who knows where your applause lines are coming and gets things going.

Can we get some applause for these event strategy ideas?

I apologize if these five ideas seem basic. Based on the number of events I attend where there is far less applause than there should be, however, I suspect even these basic ideas are overlooked. – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Mike-Brown-Gets-Brainzoomin

Learn all about how Mike Brown’s workshops on creating strategic impact can boost your success!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

In reponse to a re-share for a Brainzooming post on the negative impact on the creative process of 29 phrases used in business, Ying Ying Shi reached out to expand on the idea, mentioning the starkly different impacts of periods and commas on the creative process.

Her ideas expanding on the creative process impact of  punctuation intrigued the heck out of me, and I asked her to share her thinking for Brainzooming readers, which we’re featuring today.

Ying Ying Shi is a multilingual international manager currently working at Clueda AG, a big data start-up. Previously, she was an M&A and strategy advisor to small, medium and transnational companies. She shares her experiences and musings on leadership, business and self-improvement at www.yingyingshi.com

Here’s Ying Ying!

 

Creative Process – How Using Periods Harms You by Ying Ying Shi

Ying-Ying-ShiIn a previous Brainzooming post on the creative process, Mike listed 29 phrases blocking innovative ideas. The phrases listed are necessary, but not sufficient conditions to block our creativity. There is nothing wrong with acknowledging limitations or existing problems; this is part of life and the improvement process. It is how you deal with these observations subsequently that has an irrepressible consequence: either halting you from solutions or opening new roads and views.

Language is our main tool of thought. When you speak out loud or write things down, you organize your thoughts and bestow them with power. Care is, however, needed. The words you speak cannot be retrieved; there is no ctrl+z. The words you think and write have an impact on your brain; there is no escape from that.

Psychology has been telling us that positive words have a positive effect on us and that we can be primed by these. Some psychological studies even point out to the fact that our genes are modified by positive words.

The other language constituent (besides words) that is often neglected is punctuation marks. These are essential in our communication. Had I used not punctuation until now in this post, you would have probably had a hard time understanding it.

Punctuation assigns a certain meaning to our expressions. Is this a question? Or perhaps just a wonderful example! You can know that this sentence hasn’t come to an end, unless you see a period.

As opposed to the mere grammatical function of punctuation marks, they can also trigger different thought channels. Periods define the end of our thought process, whereas commas or even ellipsis leave us open to different options and ideas.

The phrases on Mike’s creative process post were written without punctuation marks. It is up to you to decide which ones to use.

Compare the following (the original number of the phrase in parenthesis):

  • Initial observation (3): We don’t know how to do that
  • Period: We don’t know how to do that.
  • Comma: We don’t know how to do that, but we can hire an expert.
  • Initial observation (7): We’ve done something similar before
  • Period: We’ve done something similar before.
  • Comma: We’ve done something similar before, but the circumstances are different now, and we should try again.
  • Initial observation (13): I don’t know anything about that
  • Period: I don’t know anything about that.
  • Comma: I don’t know anything about that, and I am willing to take this challenge.
  • Initial observation (15): It’s too new for our market
  • Period: It’s too new for our market.
  • Comma: It’s too new for our market, and we know it’s a great opportunity.
  • Initial observation (29): We don’t have time for that
  • Period: We don’t have time for that.
  • Comma: We don’t have time for that, though we could prioritize it for the next period.

While the phrases with periods killed a creative thought process, blocking creativity, the commas have given way to limitless possibilities of which I have only written one.

Remember when you were disappointed or feeling down? You were most probably using a period. Maybe you thought: “I failed.” Yet it really should have been “I failed, I learned, and I moved forward.”

Try replacing periods more often in your thoughts, especially when you are identifying a problem.

While the correct punctuation usage might not yet modify your creative genius, it will certainly prevent your thoughts from being stopped by a period. With the right use of punctuation marks in life, your options can be infinite . . .

Ying Ying Shi

We-Create-Innovative-Ideas-Brainzooming

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

There’s huge potential for video to capture and create powerful moments at an event as part of an overall content strategy.

Yet talking with an event organizer who had dispatched a staff member with a video camera to cover the organization’s annual event, the results were disappointing. While the organization’s event was emotional and transformative for attendees, none of that translated to the event video.

The problem was the staff member with a video camera was dispatched with no clear plan or a content strategy with direction on where to look for strong content creation opportunities.

Left to his own devices (literally and figuratively), the event video was meandering and lacked a strong storyline.

The answer is having a content strategy with a starting outline and plan on where to shoot video. There should also be a basic understanding of how to ferret out and take advantage of impromptu opportunities for great video. With the right video content strategy, a video shooter can capture a plethora of raw video footage suitable for multiple uses, including event marketing, highlight videos, and future content sharing.

cmworld photo

Content Strategy and Imagining Where Great Content Will Be at an Event

While every event is going to be different, here’s a list we created for the event organizer mentioned above to help a future video team in imagining where great content will be at an event.

We’re guessing, although it’s generic, this list will work as a starting point for many (most?) events.

Attendees and Groups

  • Attendees interacting with one another in new or very active ways.
  • Attendees voicing their ideas – whether about the conference content or personally important topics.
  • Movement or activity with the entire group or big segments of the group.
  • Opportunities to depict the entire attendee group together.
  • Reasons from attendees on why others should attend.

Emotional Content

  • Attendees having fun or experiencing other emotions during the event.
  • Casual and informal interactions.
  • Any kids or pets that are at the event.
  • Goodbye moments among attendees.
  • The most exciting moments during the event you can anticipate.
  • Content surprises the attendees don’t know about ahead of time.
  • Thank yous to attendees for attending.

Planned Content

  • Beginnings and endings of significant content sections.
  • Content from experienced speakers.
  • Content from genuine, less experienced speakers.
  • Moments tied to lyrics of songs you’re expecting to use with event video.

Behind the Scenes

  • Attendees getting to the event.
  • Attendees exploring the event space.
  • Extracurricular activities, excursions, or site seeing within the event.
  • Behind the scenes activities that reveal something about the event’s content.

Big Visual Impact

  • Shots of dramatic / cool aspects of the event space.
  • Instances where dramatic lighting will be used on stage or in other locations.
  • People with dramatic motions that don’t require words.

That’s our starting event video shooting list. What would you add to it? – Mike Brown

 

Enjoy this article? Subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

“How strong is my organization’s social media strategy?”

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question.

Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social  Strategy.”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

1

I presented both a workshop and a breakout session at last month’s Social Media Strategy Summit in Dallas. This was my second time attending a Social Media Strategy Summit this year, and conference producer Breanna Jacobs and the team from GSMI do a fantastic job of bringing together both wonderful presenters and experienced attendees together in a very interactive learning environment.

Here are a few highlights of the tweets, insights, and audience reactions to the social media strategy ideas shared at the Dallas event.

Social Media Strategy and Customer Service

Via Vanessa Sain-Dieguez (@VSDieguez) of @HiltonHotels

  • You don’t want to “train” your customers to tweet and get better attention than when you call.
  • It’s vital to listen for people mentioning your brand in multiple ways, even when someone isn’t mentioning your brand directly. For example, if the location on a tweet or Facebook update suggests a person is at your location with an issue, you want to be able to identify that and respond.
  • Hilton layered its social media-based customer services activities into pre-existing protocols between its franchisees and customer service group. This move minimized issues that might have developed if social media customer service were treated differently. That’s not to say that delivering customer service via social is simple. “Scalability is our biggest challenge every day.”
  • Successful real time marketing is about what’s relevant, not what’s trending.

Via Jeff Gibbard (@jgibbard)

  • It’s easy for customers to be rude to a logo on Twitter or Facebook. That’s not so if they sense a person on the other end. That’s why it’s important to sign your customer service social media in some way to show there’s a person involved on the brand’s end.

Social Media Strategy Insights from Adrian Parker of @Patron

Quick disclaimer – I was one of three people who won some of the new Roca Patron Tequila for live tweeting the most during the Adrian Parker presentation.

AdrianDParker2

Nevertheless, Adrian had a plethora of great strategic insights and paraquotes from his diverse career experience.

  • “Outsource your thinking, but not your decisions.”
  • “Your social strategy should be something your competitor would never do.”
  • “A best practice isn’t a strategy. It’s something you should be doing anyway.”
  • “Good strategy is inspired by, but not limited to, current customer behavior.”
  • “A good strategy should make you nervous.”
  • “Leadership is plural. Vision is singular.” Multiple people can lead against the sole vision.

An Attendee Recap

Dan Vadeboncoeur (@danvadeboncoeur) attended the SMSSummit and shared his recap on take-aways on his Media Nerds podcast. I tweeted Dan that I appreciated the shout out, especially since he sat in on both of my sessions.

Video Highlights from the Social Media Strategy Summit

In a great example of using content providers to create even more content from an event, a video crew was onsite the second day of the conference to film brief interviews with #SMSSummit presenters. There is a YouTube page with all of the videos, plus here are several from yours truly on social media and content marketing strategy.

See the video at: http://youtu.be/sOuBJzHvRBQ

See the video at: http://youtu.be/Vkf6Xu2HKWs

See the video at: http://youtu.be/MQkdKal2rtM

Wait, There’s More

This quick recap doesn’t do justice to the breadth of content at the #SMSSummit. Look for another post with additional highlights coming soon! – Mike Brown

 

Enjoy this article? Subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

“How strong is my organization’s social media strategy?”

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question.

Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social  Strategy.”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

2

I’m not a frequent plane talker.

My mother says I have a look that says, “Don’t talk to me.” If that’s true, it’s not because I consciously TRY to display that kind of look. I will admit, though, that small talk isn’t one of my favorite activities.

And on a quiet plane flight, I typically get a ton of writing done.

When someone starts airplane talking though, I’m going to listen, especially when the person is a riot.

That’s what was happening on the first leg of the flight home from Content Marketing World in Cleveland late yesterday afternoon.

Rolling in the Aisles

Blogging away while the plane was boarding, I watched with interest as a woman was rearranging luggage in the overhead bin. She grabbed a small bag and asked the owner to stow it under her seat so more luggage (specifically her own carry-on bag) would fit.

She sat down in the middle seat between me and a guy having a particularly loud phone conversation.

I think OUR conversation started with, “What’s the matter with people who think they should have loud conversations wherever they are?”

We quickly discovered we’d both spoken at Content Marketing World. Her name is Ahava Leibtag, author of “The Digital Crown: Winning at Content on the Web,” (affiliate link) and the niece of the late U.S. Senator Arlen Specter (who was from Russell, Kansas, just 30 miles from where I grew up).

SHUT UP . . . or not!

I can’t begin to replay all the hilarious ground we covered. Suffice it to say Ahava should be a stand up comedian. And during the flight, she developed her go-to, comedic catch phrase, complete with 37 different inflections of it based on the situation. I can’t reveal the comedic catch phrase, though, until she secures the URL.

Brand Strategy

Amid the laughs, Ahava also weighed in (repeatedly) on the Brainzooming brand strategy, insisting we re-brand immediately as ZoomyZoome (with two long e sounds after the zooms).

ZoomieZoomeSueme

Based on the name alone, we should be able to raise millions in venture capital, since it sounds as if it would be a hyper-hyped app! And if we want to extend the brand strategy to become a shady ambulance-chasing law firm, THAT name would be ZoomyZoome and Sue Me. You can see the results of this early brand strategy exploration for yourself.

Airplane Talk

You may ask about this post, “What is happening to the Brainzooming blog?”

I know, sue me. (See what I just did there?)

After The Beatles tribute band post the other day, I promised the very next post would be serious.

Sorry.

The NEXT post will be serious.

But this was the funniest airplane talk ever. And after a long week, you just can’t keep that to yourself.

So, what is your funniest airplane talk ever? Wanna talk about it? – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Mike-Brown-Gets-Brainzoomin

Learn all about how Mike Brown’s workshops on creating strategic impact can boost your success!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

1

Today’s post is simply silly. Even sillier than anything we’ve ever done before.

If you want serious, come back tomorrow.

Last night, as the close to the first day of Content Marketing World, there was a fun party at Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica.

COntent-Marketing-World-FLo

I wasn’t exactly sure if Nautica was the aquarium, a marina, or simply the orange clothing sponsor of Content Marketing World. Nevertheless, it was several hundred attendees at Content Marketing World noshing from local Cleveland food trucks, drinking adult beverages (the Smurf vodka-based drink was especially good), and enjoying a Beatles tribute band.

Beatles-Tribte

Speaking of Beatles tribute bands, here are the top ten things to enjoy and watch for whenever you see a Beatles tribute band (I warned you this was a silly post):

  1. The age range of the people drawn to a Beatles tribute band is remarkable. There were young women in their twenties who knew the lyrics to every song.
  2. For as long as I was there, this group never really moved beyond the first few years of The Beatles. And that was perfectly okay, except I’d hoped they’d do “Long Tall Sally.” And “Kansas City” would have been a nice touch.
  3. The quote of the night came from Elton Mayfield of ER Marketing: “If the Paul isn’t left handed (in a Beatles tribute band), you just have a guy in a costume.”
  4. Ringo didn’t sing a lot of songs, but at least the early songs Ringo sang were pretty rocking.
  5. Elton Mayfield saw Paul McCartney in Kansas City earlier this year and reported Paul is 72. I think the Paul in the Beatles tribute band with the young looking wig was close to 72 as well.
  6. I’m one (two at the most) degrees of separation away from the real Paul McCartney. It hasn’t translated into any business or personal benefits, however.
  7. This particular Beatles tribute band has been on tour for 31 years. I’m hard pressed to think of any other example of replacement parts lasting more than three times the original.
  8. You can’t go wrong with donuts covered in powdered sugar, even if they weren’t hot. Definitely, you should always go for the powdered sugar donuts. (Not technically about The Beatles cover band, but it was an important part of the evening.)
  9. When a Beatles tribute band play a George song, that’s when everyone goes to the bathroom.
  10. I can sway to a Beatles song, but that’s about it. I definitely can’t dance, even to The Beatles, but if someone asks me, I’ll try.

And that’s the dispatch from the first evening of Content Marketing World! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

The ever-growing Content Marketing World is next week in Cleveland. I’ll be co-presenting a session with global content marketing expert and author, Pam Didner, on Maximizing Content Opportunities at Events.

It’s always great to get back to Northeast Ohio. The experience will be enhanced by presenting with Pam Didner as her new book on Global Content Marketing launches (affiliate link).

Pam will be quick to tell you, however, that she won’t be talking about any book material in our presentation!

Maximizing Content and Experience Strategy at Content Marketing World

CMWorld-PresentationWhat we WILL be discussing is something we’ve characterized as a two-part case study on a transformational business event.

Pam participated in the most recent C2 conference, a very different type of event that bills itself as a “business conference somewhere between genius and insanity.” Pam will open our session with the perspective that at an event such as C2, content and experience are identical. She’ll back that up from an experiential perspective and interviews with C2 organizers.

In my portion of the case study presentation, we’ll look at C2 in the same way Brainzooming evaluates many strategies. We’ll reverse engineer the experience to identify the types of models, concepts, and strategic thinking questions that would allow another organization to replicate the same type of feel and success in their own situation. In fact, I’m in the midst of developing a download with (by current count) 250 models, concepts, ideas, and strategic thinking questions attendees can use to design their own experiences and events to maximize content creation.

Join Us at Content Marketing World

If you are attending Content Marketing World, we’d love to have you our Wednesday, September 10th session (11:30 a.m. EDT). If you are there, message me and let’s try to meet up amid the sea of orange at Content Marketing World.

Look for updates on Twitter and here on the blog during the event next week! – Mike Brown

 

Enjoy this article? Subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

“How strong is my organization’s social media strategy?”

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question.

Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social  Strategy.”

           (Affiliate Link)

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading