Guest author | The Brainzooming Group - Part 4 – page 4
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Today’s Blogapalooza article from a student in Max Utsler’s Innovation in Management of Communications class at The University of Kansas comes via Allison Dollar. Allison is a Local Business Account Executive at The Kansas City Star Media Company. Her article for today on personal leadership lays out 10 keys to hustle . . . every day.

Personal Leadership – 10 Keys to Hustle . . . Every Day by Allison Dollar

Allison-DollarIn the words of Mos Def, “Focused. I’m a hustler. And my hustle is trying to figure out the best ways to do what I like without having to do much else.”

Well-said Mos Def. Well said.

A hustler is defined by Merriam Webster as, “An enterprising person determined to succeed; go getter.”

Are you a hustler?

You don’t have to be in sales to be one but you do have to commit to the following ten steps if you want to be successful. While I consider myself a hustler in constant training these are 10 keys to hustle, every day. You have to practice them daily, get better at them, and enjoy.

  1. Love your Hustle

Whatever it is, love it. And I mean with all of your heart. If you don’t enjoy what you spend most of your life doing then it’s a waste of time; time is the one thing we can’t get more of so…again I say, Love your hustle.

  1. Listen

Most people like to talk sometimes, no, most of the time, and they talk too much. Listen more, and speak less, I promise you will hear something that will lead to a business lead, idea or relevant knowledge. If you find yourself in a situation where listening is difficult, leave. It’s not worth your time. This brings me to my next point.

  1. If it’s dead, leave it on the ground and walk away

This could refer to anything, a client that will never be happy and who takes too much time, a peer who complains all the time about the same old things, or my favorite, a manager who has no idea what he/she is doing or saying the majority of the time. If you run into any of these situations leave them immediately and do not look back, it’s not worth it.

  1. Swagger

Confidence is a non-negotiable for any professional hustler, you better be able to own whatever it is you need to own. The presentation you just gave to high-level decision makers, the smart-ass comment you dealt to a high performance peer or the stare down you delivered in the boardroom full of talented professionals just like yourself trying to get ahead. Whatever you do, get and keep your swagger. Without it, you are just like every other professional “insert your title of choice here” working day in and day out. Your swagger is just that Your Swagger. It is as unique as you are, use it to your advantage.

  1. Learn Something

Learn something every day. It’s as easy as that. Each day approach it so you learn something new, no one can ever take your knowledge away from you. Believe in your abilities and reward yourself with the knowledge it takes to come out on top every day.

  1. Be the Expert

Ensure that whatever it is you know just as much if not more than the senior level manager/sales representative/vice president or whoever it is in the room. Be able to speak in a healthy fashion no matter what the topic. Set yourself apart by showing you have taken the time to educate yourself on the topic at hand.

  1. No Fear

Period. Fear paralyzes you and has no room in the mind of a true hustler. If you have it, do not show it. Get a plan together on how you can keep it to yourself then toss it away after your mind has processed the situation. Fear is a private thing that everyone experiences but a hustler never shows.

  1. Love yourself

No one can love you like you. Sounds weird but it’s true. No one knows you better than you. Give yourself the time to process demanding information; strategize your next move or whatever it is you need. Also take care of yourself, even a proper hustler needs to eat right, exercise, and get some sleep. Know when to shut it down and take care of you.

  1. Never ask Permission

A hustler just gets it done. Don’t ask permission, ask forgiveness. Like I said, a hustler gets it done, and anyone who knows a hustler realizes this from the moment they are introduced.

  1. Network

A hustler knows everyone. The new business owner around the corner, the new employee on the second floor and even the new CEO hired to work for the competition. You can’t be successful being a recluse. It just doesn’t happen. Know your people.

Think you got what it takes to hustle? Use your cane if you need to, but get your hustle on or at least get it started. – Allison Dollar

 

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The Brainzooming blog has a wonderful group of guest authors who regularly contribute their perspectives on strategy, creativity, and innovation. You can view guest author posts by clicking on the link below.

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Lens smashing is a common innovation strategy technique to get to the next level of thinking.  With lens smashing, you articulate different perspectives and create a forced connection or dot-connecting activity to see the impact of various combinations.

So what are the lenses?

When Strategos created the lens concept in the early 2000’s, it illuminated three external and two internal lenses:

  • External lenses – Discontinuities, Customer Insights, and Economic Engines
  • Internal lenses – Orthodoxies and Core Competencies

Smashing. That sounds really powerful, doesn’t it? It can be, but as with most things, garbage in, garbage out.

Let’s start with orthodoxies. I call them “sacred elephants.” In other words, they are the things everyone believes, but no one wants to challenge.

Defining orthodoxies in your organization can be similar to teaching an elephant to dance. Both activities are nerve-racking and intimidating. Who wants to point out to an elephant that it is not exactly light on its feet? Similarly, who wants to point out that the organization is clinging to beliefs that are clearly mistaken. Remember the Naked Emperor?  There wasn’t a rush to speak up and point out the fiction everyone was willing to embrace.

Dancing-Elephants

In light of that daunting view, let’s define orthodoxies in a way that feels safer.

An article called ”20 Cognitive Biases that Screw up your Decisions,” by Samantha Lee and Shana Lebawitz, gives us a framework to identify orthodoxies in an objective fashion that will keep you from being crushed. Delivered via an infographic, the article describes many ways we let our cognitive biases keep us from making better decisions. Orthodoxies also keep us from making better decisions.

Let’s take a look at a couple of these cognitive biases and convert them to orthodoxies:

Biases

  1. Selective Perception: Here is an example of an orthodoxy that reflects this bias about competitors: “Our competitors’ practices are unethical. If customers knew about these practices, they would be outraged.”
  2. Stereotyping: Here is an example of how this bias can become an orthodoxy: “That person, place, thing, process wouldn’t fit within our culture.” Think about that one.

Here’s a new innovation strategy tool: Take the 20 biases in the article and write as many orthodoxies as you can envision for each one. Break them up among team members. Duplicate with other team members to see what is common and what is different. Give a few to executives and see what they can come up with in a short amount of time.

Next, we make those sacred elephants flip. Take the orthodoxy and write it in a way that conveys the opposite meaning.

For our previous examples, the orthodoxies could read:

  • “Our competitors have as much integrity as we do. Our customers have a tough time choosing between our offerings.”
  • “Our culture is based on inclusiveness and diversity; the more different the better.”

How does that simple restatement make you think differently about the innovation strategy possibilities?

Do you feel safe to create new ideas? The sacred elephants are dancing! – Marianne Carr

 

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Looking for Ways to Develop a Successful
Innovation Strategy to Grow Your Business?
Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookBusiness growth can depend on introducing new products and services that resonate more strongly with customers and deliver outstanding value.

Are you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise eBook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE eBook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!





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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Talking with various colleagues, clients, and potential clients recently, each discussion included a reference to innovation expertise.

“You’re the expert in innovation, what do you think?”

That started me thinking, “Am I an expert?”

Who exactly IS an innovation expert? And WHAT is an innovation expert?

I don’t know for sure, but here’s the first in a series of articles to explore the question.

One type of innovation expert knows a great deal about innovation tools and techniques that propel ideation to new heights. This is an expertise in facilitation.

Ideation

Facilitating innovation ideation is an art and a science that isn’t easy to do. It’s also definitely not for the faint of heart.

Good facilitation takes finesse, fast decision-making, an ability to read people quickly, and high energy. It’s all about the pivot- also practice.

You can read about many of these innovation tools and techniques. But you have to make it your own set.

Training by other experts is helpful (innovation training is an expertise for another article), but it takes the courage to practice, practice, and practice.

It reminds me of a stand up comedian. For a long time you make a fool of yourself. Some people like you and some people don’t. Your style works for some and not for others. You have to take a lot of risks. Work for drinks. And, most importantly, stand up and expose yourself, trying, almost every time, something new while perfecting the old over and over and over again.

What did Malcolm Gladwell say? 10,000 hours is the hurdle for expertise? Yeah, I think if you are serious about becoming the best possible Ideation facilitator, you are one kind of Innovation expert.

But again, that’s just one type of innovation expert.

Innovation-Expert-Tease

Your innovation expertise could also be in training, executing of innovation Strategy and Models, project management, and leadership.

Exploring those varied types of expertise in future weeks will help determine this innovation expert definition yet. That should lead to a snappy answer to questions about who the innovation expert in the room is. – Marianne Carr

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Looking for Ways to Develop a Successful
Innovation Strategy to Grow Your Business?
Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookBusiness growth can depend on introducing new products and services that resonate more strongly with customers and deliver outstanding value.

Are you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise eBook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE eBook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!





Download Your Free  Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Fake Book




Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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As always, click on the headline to go to the original link. Enjoy! 

Ten Stages of Creativity – Love Sandwich

“The question of what creativity is and how it works will perhaps remain humanity’s most unanswerable — but that hasn’t stopped us from trying.” –  Maria Popova, Brainpickings

Bookmark this article on the stages of creativity and refer to it again, and again, and again. There are great links to the “Wisdom of the Ages” about creativity and ideation. It also features the 10 Stages of Creativity articulated by filmmaker Tiffany Shlain:

  1. The Hunch
  2. Talk about it
  3. The Sponge
  4. Build
  5. Confusion
  6. Just Step Away
  7. “The Love Sandwich”
  8. The Premature Breakthroughlation
  9. Revisit Your Notes
  10. Know When You’re Done

This article started me thinking about the confusion that comes when talking about creativity and innovation. Is there a difference? Of course. But we can all agree that creativity and innovation are very close cousins. It’s difficult to talk about innovation without talking about creativity.

These stages of creativity seem to be a more organic, intuitive approach an artist would followed in painting, writing or filmmaking. However, I can see a parallel path for innovation.

Is there a Confusion Stage in Innovation?

Check. It’s not official, but it’s there.

How about “The Love Sandwich” Stage?

2-The-Love-Sandwich

Here’s the description from Shlain on The Love Sandwich stage:

“To give constructive feedback, always snuggle it in love — because we’re only human, and we’re vulnerable… Set expectations for where you are in the project, then ask questions in a way that allows for ‘the love sandwich.’ First, ‘What works for you?’ Then, ‘What doesn’t work for you?’ Then, ‘What works for you?’ again. If you just ask people for feedback, they’ll go straight for the jugular.” 

How helpful could this stage be during innovation?

It reminds me of the right way to critique ideas during an ideation workshop.

We all know “No” is a bad word when ideating. The more positive way to challenge an idea is instead of saying, “No, that won’t work because we only produce ten widgets an hour,” to phrase the negative feedback in question form.

For example “How might this work if we only produce ten widgets in an hour?” An alternative is, “In what ways does the number of widgets we currently produce in an hour impact this idea?”

This questioning approach opens the mind, allowing feedback to focus on recognizing opportunities and not shutting them down. Still though, a Love Sandwich sounds more fun!

There might be an opportunity to create an innovation tool mirroring Shlain’s stages of creativity, but with more rigor around the value proposition for your organization. After all, creating art is its own reward; innovation is not. – Marianne Carr

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

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Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help you generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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It’s Blogapalooza time again! In partnership with students in Max Utsler’s Innovation in Management of Communications class at The University of Kansas, Blogapalooza provides an opportunity for Max’s students to publish blog posts they write for class here and at Alexander G Public Relations

Laura-BerryThe first post for this semester is from Laura Berry, a master’s student in Integrated Marketing Communication. Laura works in marketing for a global engineering and construction company that is working to bridge tradition with innovation.

5 Characteristics that Set Game Changing Ideas Apart by Laura Berry

Innovation starts with good ideas. But how can you separate good ideas from transformative, game changing ideas? If it’s a revolutionary idea, chances are it has several of these qualities.

1. It’s not your first idea.

Let’s face it: seven billion people live on this planet. Your first idea isn’t original. Inspiration might pop into your mind, but innovation looks more like a notebook filled with sketches and scratched-out notes. If you’ve pushed, reworked and redeveloped your idea, then you’re on your way to game changing ideas.

2. The idea is simple.

Some of the best ideas look obvious in hindsight. It might be complex to build, but it needs to be easy to understand. When you hear it aloud, it makes sense. Heads nod. A social networking website that makes it easy for you to connect and share with your family and friends online? Head nod.

In the Harvard Business Review article, “Get Buy-In for Your Crazy Idea,” Author David Burkus writes, “If you have to explain a joke, it’s not funny. In the same way, if you have to spend significant time explaining how your idea will work, it’s never going to win people over.”

3. It’s creative.

To create what doesn’t yet exist, you need imagination. Imagination asks the question, “What if?” Did you just create the most powerful bag less vacuum? (Dyson) Great. But what if I don’t want to push it around? (Roomba) Awesome. So now my vacuum cleaner runs by itself. What if my lawnmower did? (Roomba robotic lawnmower). “What if” questions stretch good ideas to new places.

Framing-Ideas

4. It serves a purpose.

Thomas Edison said, “I find out what the world needs, and then I invent it.” Breakthrough ideas have an intrinsic human connection. Innovation often solves problems or meets needs. Are you old enough to remember running home to wait for a phone call or accessing the Internet through the piercing screech of dial-up? Thank goodness for innovators. When you understand the problems people face, you’re better able to help.

5. It took some sweat.

If innovation were easy, everyone would be doing it. To take an idea from good to game-changer, you have to nurture it. And that’s just a fancy way of saying it takes work. Your good idea could be a few “What if” questions from game changing ideas. Will you take it there, or will someone else? – Laura Berry

 

ebook-cover-redoBoost Your Creativity with “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation”

Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help you generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Download Your Free

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Marianne-Carr-PhotoToday I am focusing on LinkedIn inspirations for creative clicks; I get inspiration there every day.

I have been a LinkedIn fan from the beginning. Here are articles, postings, and people that inspire me from the largest online professional networking platform. Feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn. – Marianne Carr

As always with creative clicks, click on the headlines in these LinkedIn Inspirations to link to the original article.

linkedin-icon-2

 

The Death of Marketing Strategy – Killer Article!

“One topical example of ‘strategy’ without due diligence is the foray into social media.  How many brands have invested in Facebook pages and content creation without a clear idea of where this fits into an overall strategy and what they’re actually trying to achieve? Not being able to see the woods because of the trees could become the norm.” – Originally posted at Thinkshots and re-posted to the CMO Network group by Glen Myatt

Read this entire article. It is SOOOOO true. When did tactics take over?

Abstract Advantage for Innovation

“During the past 10 years, psychologists such as Yaacov Trope, Nira Liberman, and their colleagues have provided ample of evidence of what they call the ‘construal level theory,’ i.e. the closer you are to an object or event, the more specifically you think about it. While the more distant you are to that object or event, the more abstractly you think about it.” – Originally posted at Innokinectics and reposted in the Psychology of Creativity Group by Americo Mateus

Being a HUGE egghead, it inspires me to get a dose of the science behind creative thinking exercises. I read once, but of course can’t remember the source, that the reason outsiders and consultants get more credit for having new / better ideas is because of distance theory. The practical application was the next time you want to tell your boss a new idea, pitch it over the phone when you are out of town. It creates a distance influence.  I tried it, and it seemed to work.

Beeeee the Pork Chop

“The great philosopher and thought leader Rodney Dangerfield once said, ‘I was so ugly as a kid that my parents used to put a pork chop around my neck so the dog would play with me.’ Now that is fantastic advice all thought leaders, speakers, and authors should follow.” – Authored and Posted on LinkedIn by Peter Winick.

What a great visual reminder. In what ways does our strategy include a Pork Chop to hang around our neck to attract the Hungry Dogs?

The Story of Your Brand

“Business success is built on personal and emotional connections with individual customers, not some corporate mission statement that supposedly conveys your brand’s core values and goals. Despite this truth, so many stubborn businesses continue to focus on developing internal clarity as opposed to delivering unique messages through external storytelling.” – by Samuel Edwards on Business.com and re-posted on LinkedIn by Kathleen Curtis Wolf.

Kathleen Curtis Wolf re-posts a wide variety of branding, leadership and overall positivity articles that inspire me. We are connected via LinkedIn, and we actually know each other personally. Because I know Kathleen, I am always inspired by how her posts are a genuine, authentic reflection of her professional passions.  She lives her personal brand. 

Food Hall Boom in Full Swing

“A far cry from the suburban shopping mall food courts that hit their stride in the 1970s and are now falling into decline, these multi-faceted, typically indoor markets showcasing a variety of local food vendors and artisans have long been a tradition in Europe — and they’re finally hitting it big in America, with a surge of new projects that have opened in the past year and plenty more on the way.”- by Whitney Filloon, on Eater.com and re-posted on LinkedIn by Eric Stonecipher.

I don’t know Eric Stonecipher. We are connected on LinkedIn, however, which allows me to see his re-posts. That’s a funny thing about LinkedIn connections – you don’t always really know the person, do you? Eric has some of the best industry specific re-posts. Who isn’t interested in all things food?!  I click almost every one of his re-posts and read the entire article. Kudos to Eric on such great curation.

When I read this article about the Food Hall Boom trend, my first question was, “but why?” Lucky for me, there was a link to this article embedded to answer that very question.

But Why?

“As Americans become increasingly obsessed with all things culinary — and more conscientious about where their food comes from — a return to the old-school way of food shopping by visiting multiple specialized shops instead of one giant big-box store seems like a natural evolution. Food halls are stepping up to fill that interest, offering a convenient, modern approach. Many of the food halls already open or in the works are bringing new life to historic buildings, transforming underutilized spaces into new community hubs and often serving as incubators for independent businesses and startups.” – by Whitney Filloon, on Eater.com

Guilty! I have changed my food shopping habits dramatically because I feel guilty. I can’t buy food with uncertain origins anymore. I feel like a selfish person if I buy “too-commercialized” food because of its environmental impact. Maybe my Catholic up brining has something to do with this guilt.

These two articles inspired me to think about the ways this trend of centralized delivery of diverse, but competitive, small batch offerings will impact other business models before too long.

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

ebook-cover-redoBoost Your Creativity with “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation”

Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help you generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Download Your Free

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Marianne-Carr-PhotoI am crazy for podcasts. Maybe I am not an early adopter. I don’t care. I love them.

I have always been a big believer that radio advertising – great radio advertising- was the most creative, and most difficult of the traditional advertising formats. Unfortunately there is also a tradition of really bad radio advertising. That’s because it’s hard to do. When done well, audio storytelling uses the theater of the mind, making the strongest audience connection.  When imagining your own pictures, you are engaged and probably emotionally committed. When audio storytelling is good, it works the head and the heart, which is the essence of great advertising.

Which leads me to Content Marketing. In what ways are Podcasts the ultimate Content Marketing tactic? It is a one-way conversation, at first, but the podcasts I listen to suck me in so deeply that I then seek out blogs, Twitter, and Facebook forums to see what others are saying.  I even join the conversation.

However, right now, none of the podcasts I listen to is associated with a brand or some other organization that wants to separate me from my money, or even build its position as an influencer in my professional life.

Could there be a podcast interesting enough to drive this behavior from me? We will see. I hope so. In the meantime, here are my top podcast recommendations.

As always, you can get to the creative clicks via the headlines. Enjoy!Marianne Carr

Creative Clicks for Podcast Listening

The Timbre.com Postmortem XIX Best Podcasts of the Week

This week’s Review of Podcasts on Timbre featured a Freakonomics episode. Not surprising. These guys are clearly masters at creating content. A podcast provides the perfect opportunity to extend a book’s premise, eliminating the wait for creating and publishing a follow up book to keep the message alive.  A comment at the end of this week’s reviews complimented the reviewer and exclaimed that he was not surprised NPR listenership was declining. The commenter couldn’t fathom why ANYONE would listen to Radio anymore.

I know why I still listen to radio. It takes a special talent to curate programming really well. What killed radio was the commercialized programming of music based only on promotion. We, as listeners, fell victim to a B2B model.  Thus we got bored and left as soon as we could. I listen to The Bridge a local radio station that provides unexpected delight through music I would never find on my own all because the DJs are very talented curators.

In what ways might we improve our curation skills to surprise and delight our audience to be better content marketers?

The Secret of the Mystery Show

“It must be quite a trip, to go about the world with this kind of head on. If every person you see is a treasure-chest of stories just waiting for the right question to open up, then you are never more than seconds away from a glittering, life-changing revelation. But of course, they are, and we’re all just too busy power-walking between pointless appointments, listening to podcasts, to notice.

“I wouldn’t have thought it was possible to be so moved by an eighty-year-old Swiss man I have never met, in a town I will probably never visit, rediscovering a long-lost gift. But unexpectedly, I’m welling up. Empathy, like God, moves in mysterious ways.” – Richard Obrien

This review of the Podcast the Mystery Show, by Obrien, is spot on.

How might your target audience member (also known as a person) be a treasure chest of stories you can tap into for your content marketing?

The Art of Storytelling

I just started listening to Lore, a podcast featuring short, dramatic essays about folklore and other mythical longstanding beliefs. It’s a lot of fun. One sponsor is The Great Courses. This organization sponsors several of my regular podcasts; I must be the perfect target audience member. The Great Course featured is always relevant to the podcast’s topic. Sooo smart. I may never want to take a course about The Law as featured on Undisclosed (yes, I am still riding this trend, can’t help it), but I will take this course on Storytelling, particularly since I am offered a listener’s discount.  One missing cross marketing tactic is that of mentions on the websites of each organization. Why not? Integrate!

Content Marketing Institute Podcast List

It wouldn’t be right to discuss podcasts and content marketing without listing a few podcasts featuring content marketing!  Here are several. I have not had the opportunity to listen to them yet, so I would love to hear your critiques. All are produced in conjunction with The Content Marketing Institute.

Podcasts-Bubble

Creative Clicks for Reading about Podcasting

If you’re intrigued by podcasting, here are several articles addressing the fundamentals.

The Power of Podcasts for Content Marketing

This article by the Digital Agency, Koozai, from Across-The-Pond (The UK if you are not one of our US readers), is a KEEPER! Written by John Waghorn, it outlines all the basics of Podcasting for your organization. The section about Creating Your Own Podcast. Makes it seem doable. Dispels some myths. It is further fuel for the fire to create a Brainzooming Podcast. Stay tuned.

Plan the Work, Work the Plan

This article by Sark e-Media gives a great set of questions to ask yourself when deciding to launch a podcast. I am a big believer in strategy, go figure.

Facing the Blank White Page of Podcasting

Wishpond highlights content types and tips for creating a podcast.  The tip to interact with other podcasts is most intriguing. When podcasts I follow mention hosts of others – or topics from other episodes – it makes me feel like part of a very special community. I am in “the Know.” This concept of exclusivity, or being a member of something, is very powerful in marketing, especially content marketing.

So if Brainzooming starts a podcast, what do you want to hear?

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

ebook-cover-redoBoost Your Creativity with “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation”

Download our FREE “Taking the No Out of InNOvation eBook to help you generate extreme creativity and ideas! For organizational innovation success, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative growth strategies. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Download Your Free

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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