Humor | The Brainzooming Group - Part 5 – page 5
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We’ve tried to stay away from publishing multiple posts per day, but I woke up this morning, saw this creative idea on Facebook, and decided it was too funny not to go ahead and share it.

Jimmy Fallon Turns Brian Williams into a Rapper’s Delight

Here’s NBC news anchor Brian Williams rapping “Rapper’s Delight” from The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. Enjoy a laugh and a couple of minutes of fun!

This is a great example of having a creative idea, viewing non-traditional tools as your creative medium of choice, and then getting on with making it happen!  – Mike Brown

 

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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4
Kate-Jackson

Me and Kate Jackson

You know how they put a disclaimer at the end of movies and television shows as a CYA for any story, character, or animal issues?

Those disclaimers are meant to provide legal protection or at least try to ward off potential lawsuits.

It occurred to me, after reading years of blog posts, tweets, and Facebook updates that there should probably be a comparable social media disclaimer!

While there are social media policies, and rather bland Twitter profiles stating someone’s tweets don’t represent an employer’s point of view, they don’t go far enough. They don’t really protect a reader and help them understand the significant level of fiction, hype, and misinformation to which they are being exposed.

A Social Media Disclaimer Recommendation

As a result, here’s my suggested social media disclaimer to provide more accurate context for most self-serving social media content that’s out there. Try this on for size:

“Implied relationships with social media rock stars may be further away than they appear to be. Opinions are mine only, and not just as in they aren’t held by my employer. They aren’t held by ANYONE else either . . . unless I copied them directly from a social media rock star. All assessments of events, food, and social interactions are highly subjective and generally over-stated. Although pictures of me with celebrities, visiting glorious vacation destinations, and consuming fabulous food and drinks account for 99% of my photos on Facebook and Instagram, they represent only 1% of my otherwise boring life. By me sharing your content, don’t think it implies endorsement. It doesn’t even imply I read it before sharing it. Client projects mentioned in Facebook updates should not be assumed to be paying engagements. Some clients mentioned in updates are purely fictional and do not represent any real clients living or dead.”

This won’t help you beat any FTC issues on disclosing freebies you receive for review in your blog. But if people had to attach this social media disclaimer to every over-the-top, humble brag, or arrogant Facebook update they make, social networks would be a lot more tolerable.

Coming Clean on Humble Brag Social Sharing

What do you think? Would this help make the humble brag social media content you’ve seen the past week more tolerable? –  Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Hays-KSI was back home in Western Kansas for the third time in a month this past week.

Time to share a few thoughts, Larry King style, from these road trips:

Strategic Thinking on Relationships

I tend to think I hug people fairly readily, but based on recent experience, that’s not the case. Nevertheless, a hug is wonderful to solidify what might be a loose bond with someone . . . By the time there’s three people in a car, you have a resident expert on most topics within arm’s reach . . . If we think there are meaningless events and moments in our lives, it’s only because we haven’t figured out (or been open to learning) how to use them for a bigger purpose yet.

When you’re dealing with a really boisterous person, don’t forget to look for the soft-spoken individual underneath all the bluster. Chances are that individual is in there, but just afraid to be seen . . . In thirty years, and probably less, it’s apparently possible for people to completely lose sight of why they are where they are, how they got there, and what holds them together . . . If you don’t make a practice of it, start making a practice of getting these words out of your mouth: “Could you help me . . . ?” If you ask enough people, someone will want to help you . . . Checking a profile of someone rumored to be cheating with someone else, the ad on the alleged cheater’s online profile page was for detailed info on cheating spouses. Wow! Google even includes rumors in the advertising algorithm!

Experiences that Shape Us

You become what you’ve experienced. There may be ways to fight it, but what you’ve experienced always tugs at you, even in completely unforeseen ways . . . The human capacity for being shitty to others we used to love is incredible and pathetic all rolled into one . . . We all have the power to ignore the fashion statements of others . . . I never knew someone from our student activities group in college took Pat Benatar shopping at a mall the day she performed at our school. I only got to go shopping for a stool for Chet Atkins to sit on when he performed . . . Is there a song like “One of these things is not like the others,” to encourage kids to see similarities instead of differences? If not, somebody needs to write it.

Having a phone that’s decided to quit telling me I have voice mail messages is great for peace and quiet, but crappy for running a business . . . A reader left me an incredibly gracious message saying how thankful she was for the help provided by reading the blog. I want to re-listen to her message every morning for the rest of my life . . . Facebook is the ties that bind . . .What a blessing to learn that things you hoped made an impact on people really did . . . Go ahead and count your blessings instead of sheep . . .There are times when it would be great to be adept at writing fiction instead of focusing on writing blog posts. Sometimes, there’s just nothing like a short story to capture a moment. – Mike Brown

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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It is said that when the legendary college football coach Woody Hayes was asked why he preferred to run the football ball rather than pass it, Hayes replied, “Only three things can happen when you pass, and two of them are bad.”

As the Dilbert cartoon helps illustrate, you encounter much the same odds when your business strategy is developed exclusively by senior management.

Dilbert.com

Much like with a forward pass, three things can happen and two of them are bad.

  1. As in the case of Dilbert, the business strategy has a huge defect that the group that developed either it could not see or, because of groupthink or confirmation bias, would not see.
  2. The business strategy is sound, but because it is both unfamiliar to and lacks buy-in from anyone outside senior management, implementation fails.
  3. You get lucky, the business strategy is sound—even though it lacks diverse perspectives—and your organization is strong enough at implementation so you wind up creating strategic impact.

But why depend upon luck and extraordinary implementation for your business strategy to succeed?

By involving diverse participants in your strategic planning process, you can flip those odds. Involving the right people, and even the right groups of people, beyond senior management contributes toward creating strategic impact in three very important ways:

  1. It increases, sometimes exponentially, the number of ideas and strategies you develop and consider. And it greatly increases the variety and scope of those ideas and strategies.
  2. It helps those ideas and strategies be more thoroughly and critically refined and analyzed.
  3. It helps with implementation. A strategic planning process involving diverse participants comes with built in buy-in from the types of people that will have to understand and believe in the business strategy to implement it successfully.

It is, of course, possible to mess up a strategic plan developed through involving a broader base of people. If you lack strong strategic planning tools or if you choose or use participants inappropriately, bad things can still happen. But those two challenges can be dealt with by employing effective and tested planning processes and methods.

They do not rely upon luck and individual or small group brilliance. – Barrett Sydnor


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Customer experience strategy and innovation expert Woody Bendle is back, ranting up about thought leadership, what it means, and whether or not you can be a self-appointed thought leader. I’ve had a beef with the term for long time. That beef grew when a co-worker from the corporate days routed a strategy document he said was shaped by a number of thought leaders in the company. This was the first I and a really sharp co-worker had heard or seen of it. Get the picture? After that, the inside joke between us was whatever the hurdle was to be a thought leader, we were apparently FAR from it. But who knows, if you can meet Woody’s criteria, you just might be thought leader! Here’s Woody:

You Just Might be a Thought Leader by Woody Bendle

I look forward to this time every year when the Nobel prizes are awarded!  How exciting!

Since 1901 (with the exception of three years during WWII), the global community has celebrated the achievements of individuals making the most substantial contributions towards the benefit of mankind in Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, Literature, World Peace, and (since 1969) Economics.

The list of Nobel Laureates, in my opinion, is the quintessential who’s who list of Thought Leaders.  Here are a few you might recognize:

  • Marie Curie – Chemistry – 1911
  • Albert Einstein – Physics – 1921
  • T.S. Elliot – Literature – 1948
  • Max Theiler – Medicine – 1951
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. – Peace – 1964
  • Milton Friedman – Economics – 1976

Ranting-Woody-Bendle2Quite a list of thought leaders, wouldn’t you agree?

So you say you want to be a thought leader?

They say timing is everything, and the timing of this year’s Nobel prizes is really interesting in that I recently participated with entrepreneurs and innovators in a moderated discussion on Branding and Public Relations for startup businesses.  Within the first few minutes, the group’s conversation turned to the importance of being recognized as a “thought leader”’  For 45 minutes, the group discussed thought leadership and what they were doing (or thought others could be doing) to be seen as Thought Leaders.

I kept thinking there sure was a lot of misunderstanding about thought leadership. As far as I was concerned, most of what the group was talking about had little, if anything, to do with true thought leadership. What I took away from the group’s discussion, was thought leadership essentially boils down to three things:

  1. Putting out a lot of content that positions oneself (or one’s organization) as being a thought leader
  2. Having a lot of followers sharing or “liking” your content
  3. Getting a reputable publication do an article on you (or your organization) talking about your thought-leading status

While these tactics may very well help grow a business or build a brand, I do not at all feel it makes one a thought leader.

On my way home, I replayed the thought leadership conversation mentally, and it really bothered me that so many people actually felt that:

  1. It is really important to be seen (or positioned) as a thought leader
  2. It is relatively straight forward to actually become a thought leader
  3. And labeling yourself as a thought leader is expected in today’s business world

I flat-out disagree! True thought leaders are few and very far between!  They occupy the rarest of rare air!  They are in fact, the types of  extraordinary individuals who win Nobel Prizes!  But I have to admit, I wasn’t able to necessarily come up with a succinct working definition of Thought Leader.

You Just Might Be a Thought Leader

As I batted around some working principles of “thought leadership”, my inner Jeff Foxworthy took over.  Given no widely agreed upon definition for Thought Leadership, I took a crack at coming up with some of my own criteria.

  • If you have a body of thought named after you . . . you just might be a thought leader.
  • If you have created a widely used strategic framework, and it is named after you . . . you just might be a thought leader.
  • If you have developed an approach that has become the foundation for an industry or broader discipline . . . you just might be a thought leader.
  • If your approach to something has revolutionized the path forward for your field . . . you just might be a thought leader.
  • If you have an elementary particle named after you . . . you just might be a thought leader (with a nod to this year’s Nobel Prize for Physics recipient Peter Higgs).
  • If you have actually won the Nobel Prize . . . you just might a thought leader.

And here’s one more for good measure:

  • If you have the audacity call yourself a thought leader . . . you most definitely are NOT a thought leader!

I’m sure with more time, I could add to my list, but this is a pretty good starting point.  Besides, I’d love to hear some of your Jeff Foxworthy-esque thought leadership criteria! – Woody Bendle

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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3

What-to-blog-about-bubbleIt’s easy, once you start blogging, to get frustrated and fall out of the habit of writing regularly.

For others, you can become too obsessed with thinking about what to blog about and creating content.

I’ll admit to being in the too obsessed about creating content camp. I’m not proud of that, it’s just kind of how things are right now.

20 Signs You Are Too Obsessed with Creating Content

And figuring one of the first steps to correcting being overly focused on what to blog about it is to identify the symptoms, here are twenty warning signs you are obsessed with creating content.

How many describe you?

  1. Your life’s motto is ABCC – Always Be Creating Content.
  2. Never being without something to capture an idea or start getting notes down for a blog post.
  3. Knowing the exact number of blog posts in queue and what day/date they will run out.
  4. Having half-started (or “half-completed” – depending on how you look at it) blog posts scattered through multiple files and notebooks.
  5. Thinking, “That ‘Is the blog post half-started or half-completed’ thing is a good idea for a blog post.”
  6. Taking photos of things you see not because they are interesting in and of themselves but because they could be future blog post photos.
  7. Forgetting what you’ve previously written and accidentally creating content that’s pretty much the same every six months.
  8. Focusing so much on what you still have to write you have no idea what the blog post for today is.
  9. Knowing pretty much the exact number of words you’ve written for your blog since its inception.
  10. Categorizing people based on how likely interacting with them is to inspire a new blog post.
  11. You’ve written a complete blog post on your phone in a doctor’s office waiting for the doctor to show up. (Bonus points if it was “multiple blog posts,” and you’ve done it multiple times.)
  12. Spending more time backing up your blog files than you do your financial records.
  13. Spending any time at all contemplating what the best number of items is to attract readers to a list blog post.
  14. When you get sick, the first thing you think about is whether you have enough blog posts written for the length of time the illness might keep you in bed.
  15. Scheduling your entire day to start at 5:10 a.m. so you can check the editing on your new blog post before the daily blog email goes out to readers.
  16. You’ve taken a personal vow to blog, “For better or for worse, in sickness and in health, ’til death does my blog stop.”
  17. Factoring how much content you’ve created into your assessment of how good a day has been.
  18. Praying for the inspiration and creativity to come up with fresher content than you have created recently.
  19. Needing to write THIS blog post on a Saturday night at 11:30 before you allow yourself to go to bed.
  20. After writing this post, thinking, “Could I still get one more post done before going to sleep?”

How did you score?

Are you too obsessed with what to blog about?

I’m not sure yet what the minimum score is to suggest you are too obsessed with creating content. I’m guilty on all twenty, but maybe a fourteen or fifteen signals a problem (as in, “Hi, I’m Mike, and I have a problem with blogging taking over my life.”)

Take the quiz, and let me know what you think.  – Mike Brown

 

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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BoredOn Sunday, a Facebook friend sent me a message saying he was bored. Unfortunately, I was in the middle of things and couldn’t break away to do some creative thinking and message suggestions to him.

But his message did get me thinking: What do you do with a bored adult to amuse them, especially if the bored adult is you?

Maybe with a kid you’d give them Cheerios or tell them to get outside and do something. Or maybe you’d suggest they get some paper and draw something. And maybe those same ideas would work for an adult.

Creative Thinking and 34 Ideas for a Bored Adult

But just in case this ever happens again . . . to someone else or to me . . . here are 34 ideas for things bored adults can do when they are unable to come up with ideas to beat boredom. By the way, this creative thinking post was written in the middle of the night when I woke up with a sore throat and couldn’t go right back to sleep, but figured I could do some creative thinking to put me back to sleep.

So if you’re a bored adult, how about trying any of these to beat boredom?

  1. Walking around the neighborhood
  2. Watching a completely different TV show / network than you ever watch
  3. Doing something that will make you laugh
  4. Taking a nap
  5. Cooking something . . . even if you can’t cook very well
  6. Going to a bookstore or the magazine rack at a store and start perusing new publications
  7. Having a meal – not a bunch of snacks – but a real, hot meal
  8. Going to church
  9. Talking with someone in person
  10. Chatting with someone online
  11. Helping someone who could use your assistance
  12. Doodling whatever comes to mind
  13. Being completely silent
  14. Making a list about some topic and come up with at least 25 items for your list
  15. Working a crossword puzzle
  16. Doing a task you find completely mindless and let your mind wander as you do it
  17. Going and getting sweaty . . . your choice of how you do it
  18. Playing with a dog (or a cat if you’re a cat person)
  19. Visiting someplace completely new where you’ll see other people – a museum, a park, a store, a restaurant, an amusement park, etc.
  20. Writing a list of all your blessings (and yes, you have to come up with 25 of them)
  21. Asking someone else what they do to get past boredom
  22. Having sex
  23. Calling a friend you haven’t talked to in ages
  24. Writing a story about a fond memory in your life
  25. Listening to exciting or stimulating music
  26. Relaxing by sitting still and emptying your mind of worries, concerns, and expectations
  27. Forcing yourself to do the thing that is MOST boring to you right now
  28. Getting away from the computer for a few hours or the rest of the day
  29. Using a creative tool that’s completely new or that at least you haven’t used for some time
  30. Writing, drawing, videoing, or somehow otherwise capturing information about how to do something you do better than anyone else
  31. Playing with kids and letting them set the rules for whatever you are playing
  32. Putting someone else in charge for a bit, i.e., letting them tell you what to do, deciding what you’ll have for lunch or dinner, suggesting ideas to get past your boredom
  33. Taking a long shower
  34. Making yourself write a blog post (or anything else that you’ll find a productive use of your bored time)

If I had been able to do the creative thinking then and respond directly to my friend (who used to be a DJ at a club back in my hometown) when he sent the Facebook message, I’d have put together a couple of these ideas and suggested he write a guest blog post for Brainzooming about what made great dance music when he was a DJ and if the criteria are any different now. That might have got him out of his boredom and saved me some blogging time, too. You gotta love the mutual benefits of that idea!  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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