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A new national experiment begins. Strategically, it’s smart to avoid experiments at the top of any organization, but this is what we’re facing. 

How will this experiment unfold?

Will it be like a Bugs Bunny cartoon from long ago where Elmer Fudd took on the persona of whatever hat he wore? Does being in a particular position cause one to suddenly behave in an appropriate manner for the office one assumes?

Will it be like having a turnaround CEO at the top? One good turnaround CEO whose tenure I lived through didn’t particularly trust anyone. He wanted others under him that didn’t trust the functions they were supervising. Because of this, they weren’t always well-versed in the areas they were running. Ultimately, he was looking to them to make hard decisions with no attachment to the past.

Will it be like having a sociopath running the show? Having lived through several leaders who acted dangerously, inappropriately, and without regard for others, that would be a rough go for everyone, no matter your political preference.

Will it demonstrate the power of prayer? If enough people started praying for better leadership, would divine intervention save us from what is already an ugly pattern that seems to have no hope of ending well, absent a miracle?

Will it prove, as many believe, that a business person with an up-and-down track record is really U.S. Grant, Adolf Hitler, Hugh Hefner, and Lester Maddox, with healthy doses of nepotism, all rolled into one? It might seem extreme, but you can easily connect the dots and find yourself pointed in that direction.

Will it cause all of us, the people of this nation, to rethink our political and social structures, and aggressively work for something better in 2020? Lord, I hope that’s the case.

As much as it would be nice to be a disinterested observer of this experiment, no one in the United States (or the world, for that matter), can afford that attitude. 

Pick your position, do your strategic thinking, and start creating positive change — today! – Mike Brown

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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In recent years, I took a blog vacation the last few weeks of each year. That was important to get a break and refresh creatively for the New Year.

If you noticed, the blog vacation started a month early in 2016, starting suddenly in mid-November.

The reason is my dad, Bernie Brown, passed away unexpectedly on November 19, 2016.

Typing that last sentence stops me in my tracks.

While intellectually, I know my dad died, I have been so steeped in processing the impact of his passing on my life, it has been tough to focus beyond only the most essential things in front of me.

Weeks later, I am still coming to grips with my dad’s death. That is likely why I have not written anything about it here yet.

If you follow me on Facebook, you might have seen updates the week he died featuring the hashtag #SurroundedByLove. I used the hashtag to represent the tremendous outpouring of concern, affection, and love people shared in the week between my dad’s death and the funeral.

For those of you who are blog readers, but are not as deep in what’s going on in my personal life, here are a few previous Brainzooming posts about my dad:

If you would like a deeper sense of this incredible man, and how his world view shapes what you see on this blog, here’s a video of the eulogy I delivered at his funeral. The audio is not great in the church. If you are interested, a pretty close transcript of my remarks is at this link.

As comfortable, as I am in where our relationship was, I miss him tremendously and am trying to fill the big hole he left in my family. So if the blogs don’t come rushing back like they did previously, you know the reason.  – Mike Brown

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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A fundamental part of effectively building a social media network is positively and beneficially interacting with other social media users. Another part is being able to successfully  ask members of your social media network for assistance and participation – either collectively or individually. Doing this successfully directly relates to the social media etiquette you display when you’re making a big social media “ask” of your audience.

There are clearly better and worse ways to ask your social media network for action. And based on requests we have received lately, there are a variety of basic social media etiquette practices social media users (even prominent ones) don’t know, selectively follow, or choose to blatantly ignore.

11 Keys to Seeking Social Media Network Help

When it comes to seeking help from your social media network . . .

  • If you solicit people in your social media network to leave comments on your new blog post, be prepared to check for pending comments throughout the day and APPROVE them as they are made.
  • When asking your social media network to “Like” or “Follow” your new social media presence, start sharing content in advance so your social media presence looks like an active one.
  • If you’re going to direct message someone to prompt them to retweet your important new social media content, make sure the link you include works – every time.
  • When you request guest blog posts, offer some direction on who your audience target is and provide activation support within your social media network after the guest post appears.
  • If you want to become a guest author on a blog, first show up and participate on the blog (or other social networks where the blogger is active) instead of simply making a request out of the blue.
  • When writing a guest post for someone else’s blog, don’t send the same post to multiple bloggers.
  • If you ask for a review of your book, webinar, or speech, be willing to adapt to a blogger’s writing approach (and actually supply the discount code you promise will be available to the blog’s readers).
  • When throwing out a question on Twitter or Facebook to other social media users, be ready to interact with members of your social media network who respond.
  • If you insist on sending an auto-direct message to someone who newly follows you on Twitter and include a question in the tweet, follow them back beforehand so they can respond to you with a direct message.
  • When asking someone within your social network to do something for you, do something for them first.
  • Use “please” and “thank you” liberally – even if it means sending someone another message (or two) to say them.

There are certainly more than these eleven social media etiquette tips, but these provide a solid foundation for cultivating greater social media network success.

What other social media etiquette tips would you add?

What social media etiquette miscues do you see when people make requests via social media? And what successful social media etiquette practices do you appreciate within your social media network?  – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Photo by: diesel | Source: photocase.com

10. The USB drive with all my proper blog post starting ideas was downstairs, and it was too much of a hassle to go down and get it.

9. Driving across Kansas doesn’t inspire nearly the same blog post creativity that flying does.

8. Too much time spent writing and not nearly enough time spent absorbing creative ideas recently.

7. I still owe Bob Fine an article about Google Fiber in Kansas City for The Social Media Monthly magazine.

6. I’m trying to get comfortable with not writing a blog post every day.

5. Suffering from a persistent case of creative apathy.

4. No one is demanding a post today (or on Thursday or Friday).

3. My focus right now is on not screwing up cooking Thanksgiving turkey for my mother-in-law.

2. After hearing Joe Pulizzi a few weeks ago, it’s clear we need to spend more time on the marketing side rather than the content creation side of “content marketing.”

1. I’ve temporarily run out of interesting lists. – Mike Brown

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help your organization make a successful first step into social media.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Okay, that’s the second misleading headline this week, but I wanted to get the attention of all my market research friends in case you all didn’t see this Dilbert comic strip from this past Sunday!

Dilbert.com

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Where do you fit in the Intellectual Capital Hierarchy?

  • Those who can, do.

  • Those who can’t do, go around the country talking about case studies of those who do.

  • Those who can neither do nor share case studies, like to pay to hear stories of those who do.

Mike Brown

I “do” and also “talk,” for the most part, about stuff I’ve actually “done” instead of reading about stuff others have done and talking about it. It would be great to participate in your event or training session to share an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to see how we can get your audience members Brainzooming!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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