Quotes | The Brainzooming Group - Part 3 – page 3
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For variety, I’m going to primarily shut up and listen this week, sharing links, quotes, and ideas on innovation, creativity, and strategic thinking. I’ll offer my thoughts in the comments section at Brainzooming. I hope to find yours there too! Let’s get started!

Creative Quickie – Creativity Quotes

Here are some quick quotes on creativity right from Twitter, so they may or may not be accurate. Enjoy them and add your cool quotes in the comments!
@ShaunConnell Rationality begets creativity. Until you understand the box, you can’t think outside the box.
@healthyincome4u Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way. ~Edward De Bono
@PopWuping “If limitation spawns creativity, is the limitless resource of the Internet a good thing?” — Alec Soth
@earthXplorer “Creativity is the power to connect the seemingly unconnected.” ~ Anonymous
@pixelati “Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist.” – Thomas Disch
@hottomali Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. – Scott Adams
@boxofcrayons RT @joevans: From Sir Ken Robinson: “If you are not prepared to be wrong — you will not come up with anything original.
@boxofcrayons RT @joevans: More Sir Ken: People are being educated out of their creative capacity. We do not grow into creativity, we grow out of it.
@JackieAustinBNC Creativity is generated by humor combined with conflict. WOW
@lildrummergie routinely doin somethin u enjoy over & over again, without variation or creativity, can diminish even that enjoyment. swimmin for instance
@pseudoliterat “Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that’s creativity.” – Charles Mingus
@gregnyc Fast Company Editor: “[Only creativity and aggressive innovation…will fuel a turnaround.]”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We’re in an annual transitional time in sports. Football just wrapped up, baseball spring training has started, and Matt Kenseth won the rain-shortened Daytona 500 in NASCAR yesterday. There was even a big poker tournament on ESPN Sunday. While there’s not a lot on sports here, this week’s articles will each touch on sports-related strategy lessons.

“One of Them Racing Lessons”
For several years, I ran a NASCAR sponsorship. It was a wonderful testing ground for guerrilla marketing approaches, and surprisingly, yielded a great strategy story from an unlikely source – our driver, Jimmy Spencer, “Mr. Excitement.”
At a 2002 Dover, DE race, our team had a good but not great car. The weather was iffy all day as storm clouds rolled over, and rain drops weren’t far behind. As the rain started, most cars stayed on the track to keep their positions, figuring the race would be rained out.
Instead of following, our car left its position among the leaders, heading for a pit stop to get gas and tires just as the race was halted. As a result, we went to the back of the pack, ruining our chances for a strong finish – if the rain washed out the race.
Why did the team make the decision?
Our team checked all available radar information and saw the rain should stop after too long. Knowing our car’s mileage and tire wear, coupled with how much of the race would remain if it resumed, the team used a strategy based on its insight (and expectation) the race would go the distance.
So what happened?
Unlike yesterday’s Daytona 500, the clouds moved on and the race resumed. While nearly every other car headed for the pits, Jimmy Spencer moved up to third. As racing heated up near the end, the first and second place cars made contact, slowing down just enough for Jimmy to drive underneath them and take the lead. “Mr. Excitement” won the race.
Even though we’d try to script what Jimmy would say, we’d always hold our breath when they gave Jimmy the microphone. In the winner’s circle that day, Jimmy made an unexpected great strategic statement: “We didn’t have the best car today, but we had the best strategy.”
I’m not sure if Jimmy meant all that in his comment, but I’ve used this story many times since because it’s truly a great strategic insight with value to all business strategists! – Mike Brown

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The first quote below from Matthew Arnold was on a cardboard coaster in my hotel room in Cancun, Mexico last year. It was intriguing, and I brought it back. Doing some quick research on him, uncovered a variety of intriguing quotes of his:

  • “Culture is properly described as the love of perfection.”
  • “For the creation of a masterwork of literature two powers must concur, the power of the man and the power of the moment, and the man is not enough without the moment.”
  • “Use your gifts faithfully, and they shall be enlarged; practice what you know, and you shall attain to higher knowledge.”
  • “The freethinking of one age is the common sense of the next.”
  • “Greatness is a spiritual condition.”
  • “To have the sense of creative activity is the great happiness and the great proof of being alive.”

Hope you enjoyed Creative Quickie Week, and watch for weekend updates on Twitter!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Someone forwarded a statement made by GE CEO Jeff Immelt at the Business for Social Responsibility Conference in early November 2008:

“The economic crisis that we’re going in right now doesn’t represent the cycle. It represents a reset. And I think people that understand that will prosper in the future, and people that don’t understand that will (I think) get left behind. The era of transparency, accountability for corporations, responsibility is profoundly different today versus where it was even six months ago . . . I think when we come out of this fog this notion that companies need to stand for something and need to be accountable for more than just the money that they earn is going to be profound.”

He went on to talk about people being afraid and the importance of leaders to help shape fear into self-confidence.

Very true words.

So what do you do to get through the reset as strongly and innovatively as possible? Three suggestions:

1. Although some things have diverted from the expected path, determine what important fundamentals are still in place from which to move forward.

2. Imagine the range of relevant possibilities that may yet unfold. Amid what may be presented as tremendous uncertainty, look for common elements among the possibilities. Figure out actions you can take that make sense irrespective of which scenario plays out.

3. Identify what everyone else is doing in reaction to short-term swings and irrelevant possibilities. Then dig deep (maybe pray hard) for the fortitude, wherewithal, and mental composure to move forward relative to the long-line with your sights focused beyond the “fog.”

That’s my strategy.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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To wrap the week, here are some quotes and notes from the marcus evans Customer Segmentation conference last week:

  • “If you could say it in words, there’d be no reason to paint.” – American artist Edward Hopper from an airport billboard at arrival
  • “If I’d asked people what they wanted, they’d have said ‘faster horses.’” – Henry Ford from Sheryl Connelly’s consumer trend presentation

Several quotes from “Connecting What You Value to What You Do” presented by Kevin Clark, Brand & Value Experience at IBM:

  • “FUMIFU – First Use Must Inspire Future Use TMPolyvision Products, a Steelecase Company
  • “You can tell you have good scenarios when they are both plausible and surprising; when they have the power to break old stereotypes; and when the makers assume ownership of them and put them to work. Scenario making is intensely participatory, or it fails.” – from Peter Schwartz’s book, “The Art of the Long View” , which both Kevin and Sheryl recommended
  • “People forget what you say, forget what you did, but never forget how you made them feel.” – Maya Angelou

That’s a wrap for the conference recap. It was great to meet everyone there and thanks to Ana Bardelas for producing a great event and making everybody attending feel very welcome!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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“Perception is strong and sight weak. In strategy it is important to see distant things as if they were close and to take a distanced view of close things.” – Miyamoto Musashi (1584-1645, legendary Japanese swordsman

“It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” – Aristotle (384-322 BC, Greek philosopher)

“Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.” – Sun Tzu (c. 490 BC, Chinese military strategist)

“Unless a variety of opinions are laid before us, we have no opportunity of selection, but are bound of necessity to adopt the particular view which may have been brought forward.” – Herodotus (5th century BC Greek historian)

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to see how we can provide as-needed assistance to challenge and refine your strategic thinking and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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