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A fundamental part of effectively building a social media network is positively and beneficially interacting with other social media users. Another part is being able to successfully  ask members of your social media network for assistance and participation – either collectively or individually. Doing this successfully directly relates to the social media etiquette you display when you’re making a big social media “ask” of your audience.

There are clearly better and worse ways to ask your social media network for action. And based on requests we have received lately, there are a variety of basic social media etiquette practices social media users (even prominent ones) don’t know, selectively follow, or choose to blatantly ignore.

11 Keys to Seeking Social Media Network Help

When it comes to seeking help from your social media network . . .

  • If you solicit people in your social media network to leave comments on your new blog post, be prepared to check for pending comments throughout the day and APPROVE them as they are made.
  • When asking your social media network to “Like” or “Follow” your new social media presence, start sharing content in advance so your social media presence looks like an active one.
  • If you’re going to direct message someone to prompt them to retweet your important new social media content, make sure the link you include works – every time.
  • When you request guest blog posts, offer some direction on who your audience target is and provide activation support within your social media network after the guest post appears.
  • If you want to become a guest author on a blog, first show up and participate on the blog (or other social networks where the blogger is active) instead of simply making a request out of the blue.
  • When writing a guest post for someone else’s blog, don’t send the same post to multiple bloggers.
  • If you ask for a review of your book, webinar, or speech, be willing to adapt to a blogger’s writing approach (and actually supply the discount code you promise will be available to the blog’s readers).
  • When throwing out a question on Twitter or Facebook to other social media users, be ready to interact with members of your social media network who respond.
  • If you insist on sending an auto-direct message to someone who newly follows you on Twitter and include a question in the tweet, follow them back beforehand so they can respond to you with a direct message.
  • When asking someone within your social network to do something for you, do something for them first.
  • Use “please” and “thank you” liberally – even if it means sending someone another message (or two) to say them.

There are certainly more than these eleven social media etiquette tips, but these provide a solid foundation for cultivating greater social media network success.

What other social media etiquette tips would you add?

What social media etiquette miscues do you see when people make requests via social media? And what successful social media etiquette practices do you appreciate within your social media network?  – Mike Brown

 

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The June 2012 issue of Fast Company highlights the magazine’s list of The 100 Most Creative People in Business 2012. I will admit to not reading all of previous Fast Company 100 Most Creative People in Business lists. This year, however, having Ceelo Green on the cover (along with Purrfect) compelled me to take a shot at reviewing the entire list in-depth for the first time.

And of course, taking the time to read the whole list necessitated coming up with a way to turn the effort into a Brainzooming blog post. My starting idea was to pick one creative inspiration from each of the 100 people and turn the creative lessons into a massive 100-item list post.

After going through and identifying the 100 creative lessons that stood out for me, however, I realized the post was about 3000 words! That is typically a week’s worth of blog posts!

To not overtax you, the list of creative lessons I captured from the Fast Company Most Creative list is going to be spread out over several days in this shortened week. Each lesson references the person whose profile inspired it, along with the number they had on the list.

Today’s list includes thirty-one creative strategy lessons from this year’s list. Other days will include lessons from the list on creative perspectives, storytelling, and disruptive thinking. The hope is the lessons get you thinking even more creatively and provide ideas for enhancing your own creative efforts.

Creative Strategy Lessons from Fast Company – The 100 Most Creative People in Business 2012 List

Surround yourself with people who have contrasting thinking styles . . . then hold on.  Flavio Pripas & Renato Steinberg – Cofounders, Fashion.me (#54)

Success and determining which of your efforts will be successful are for your audience to decide. It’s a numbers game, so launch and see which things will hit.  Julie Klausner – Comedy Writer (#59)

If people aren’t buying you based on your talents, maybe it’s because they don’t how your values and goals fit with their aspirations.  Shara Senderoff – Cofounder, CEO, Intern Sushi (#63)

Start with your life problems and think through how to solve one of them if you want to make better apps (or maybe anything else).  Lee Linden – Cofounder and CEO, Karma (#67)

Really hone what you do strategically by only addressing the most important part of your customer base and quit focusing on everyone else.  Sarah Robb O’Hagan – President, Gatorade (#23)

What opportunities exist for your organization to be a creative magnet to your audiences?  – Marci Harris – Founder, Popvox (#13)

To build connections online, start with asking questions and offering your knowledge to aid others.  Claire Diaz-Ortiz – Manager of Social Innovation, Twitter (#21)

Try presenting an all-or-nothing creative vision and strategy. No room for compromise. Take it or leave it, but don’t tweak it.  Celestine Maddy – Founder, Wilder (#99)

To make your creative pitch, play out the negative things that would happen to the potential client if they don’t follow your recommendation and embrace your creativity.  Laura Mather – Cofounder /  Chief Strategy Officer, Silver Tail Systems (#16)

Even though it’s easier to sponsor another organization’s event, create a sponsorship property specifically for your organizationAbanti Sankaranarayanan – Deputy Manager Director for India, Diageo (#37)

“I don’t ever want to represent anybody. It’s my duty to enlighten people.”  Neil Degrasse Tyson – Host, PBS’s Cosmos and Radio Show StarTalk (#49)

When volunteers are able to use their natural talents and expertise (as opposed to donating time for something they’re not good at doing), you’re more likely to retain them.  Rachel Chong – Founder, CEO, Catchafire (#56)

Have a review board comprised entirely of your target market – even if that’s a group of grade school kids – to see if what you’re planning resonates with them.  Olajide Williams –  Founder, President, Hip Hop Public Health (#65)

When you’re getting started, be prepared to chase after possibilities and test cases you hadn’t imagined.  Glenn Rink – Founder, AbTech Industries (#71)

If you had one thousand “followers, friends, and fans that meant something,” that’s better than 10 million unengaged people. (Really? In pure numbers, to get the same amount of participation from 100% of one thousand people, you’d only need 1/100 of 1% participation from 10 million people.) Jared Leto – Entrepreneur, Musician (#72)

Borrow (complete) strong design contexts from outside your industry and apply them to what you do to look different. (Example: Applying Heathrow airport signage to mobile phone interfaces.)  Jeff Fong – Design Lead for Windows Phone, Microsoft (#81)

Unlikely customers will stretch your organization’s creativity in finding new ways to solve their problems.  Hannah Choi Granade – President, Advantix Systems U.S.A. (#73)

Give your team an assignment from a demanding fictional client to stretch its creativity beyond the marketplace’s expectations and extract your “creative aspirations from (y)our finances.”  – Mike Simonian, Maaike Evers – Designers, Mike and Maaike (#76)

“Seventy percent of an experience should be what consumers know and thirty percent should be surprise and delight.”  Rachel Shechtman – Founder, Story (#80)

What are you doing to make “eye contact” with potential customers virtually? And what are you doing to engage them (with their interests in mind) when they get really close?  Sam Mogannam – Owner, Bi-Rite Market (#86)

Find ways for your best customers to share their expertise and hacks with your new customers.  – Cindy Au – Community Director, Kickstarter (#82)

Head directly to where your audience is. Do not wait around at your online site. Share your content where they are and get something started.  Vivi Zigler – President, Digital Entertainment, NBC Universal (#89)

Manufacture greater scarcity in the experience you create over time to push more robust intensity, deeper interaction, and the possibility of greater participant leadership in shaping the experience.  Jerri Chou – Founder, The Feast Social Innovation Conference (#94)

What would your design process look like if the client specified every detail they wanted? Do you think that’s a level of involvement your clients are really seeking?  Edwin Neo – Founding Partner, Ed Et Al Shoemakers (#98)

Celebrate customers using your product in incredible ways. Make them the creative heroes of your brand.  Sally Grimes – Global Vice President, Sharpie (#100)

Whether in traditional or new media, people spend time with and pass-on content they expect friends will enjoy.  Ben Smith – Editor, Buzzfeed (#29)

Great advice from Magic Johnson: “It’s okay to be famous and be well liked, but you got to start owning things.”  Shaq – C’mon. It’s Shaq. He doesn’t need a title. (#74)

When trying to signal your commitment to the market, there’s no short cut to the time advantage of starting now and sticking with it.  Lourenço Bustani – Founder, Brazil CEO, Mandalah (#48)

Celebrity still counts for something so find a way to borrow the authority of celebrities to gain attention and action.  Yael Cohen, Founder – F*ck Cancer (#38)

Look and create five years ahead. What creative inputs will be important then?  Carla Schmitzberger – President, Havalanas (#97)

Look for games as the high impact form of artistic expression for decades to come.  Chelsea Howe – Director of Design, SuperBetter Labs (#41)  – Mike Brown

 

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The 2011 TEDxKC event was Thursday, August 18, and based on the tweets and blog posts during and after, it was a tale of two TEDxKC experiences at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. For those who arrived very early and made it into the Nelson’s auditorium to see the presenters live, it was the typical idea-enriching TEDxKC experience.

For everyone else who had to view the 2011 TEDxKC event via video in an “overflow” room in the Nelson’s Bloch building, the evening was a huge disappointment poor audio / visual performance, ineffective seating, slow response to issues (which were quite apparent if you were watching the #TEDxKC hashtag), and audience defections.

A Disclaimer

Much of the rest of the week on the Brainzooming blog will feature very positive recaps of the outstanding 2011 TEDxKC program. I received my personal ticket to the 2011 TEDxKC event courtesy of VML, the primary sponsor and organizer. Having worked with VML as our agency for many years, I have a number of relationships there, and think that Mike Lundgren, who has spearheaded the Kansas City TED events, and VML have performed an incredible public service by bringing TEDx to Kansas City.

Because the TEDxKC programs have been so strong, the resulting buzz and popularity of the events have outpaced the support resources (venue, production, surrounding logistics, and activities) being applied. The challenges were not from what was happening on stage at the 2011 TEDxKC event; it’s what was happening (or wasn’t) beyond the stage that created negative sentiment this year.

The 2011 TEDxKC Experience

“Don’t Meet Me There, Beat Me There”

We’d invited several people to attend TEDxKC and arrived really early. That didn’t mean, however, we didn’t experience intra-line squabbles. A group (or groups – tough to tell because they all looked alike) of older women  hassled us several times, repeatedly accusing me of butting in line. I got the glares, the snide comments, the whispering – the whole nine yards. I guess festival seating still leads to poor behavior among older baby boomers, the same people who earned festival seating its bad rap in the 1970s.

Their reactions were ironic, because being known for working a line pretty aggressively for position, I was on my best behavior at TEDxKC, trying to play by all the rules we had been told beforehand. Amazing how mad people get when they feel you’ve invaded their $10 worth of space.

If Only Someone Would Say “Why”

The 2011 TEDxKC theme was “If only. Only if.” An intriguing theme, but one nearly unspoken from the stage. Any overarching explanation for why these presenters were chosen and some supporting context to the event was also lacking. Since TEDxKC is described (and rightly so) as a “curated” event, it would be helpful to have a perspective (delivered from the stage, contained on the lanyards, posted in the venue) that connects the theme, the presenters, and the thinking behind the program’s design. Maybe it’s in the iPhone app introduced for the 2011 TEDxKC. I don’t have an iPhone (as I’m sure SOME others in the crowd did not), so if that’s where it was, I missed it.

The Universal Service Recovery Tonic

Later on in the overflow room fiasco, the Nelson-Atkins Twitter account announced free beer during TEDxKC for the overflow attendees. It may have helped a little. In a later Twitter conversation with Chris Reaburn, he remarked that free beer is the universal service recovery beverage, communicating, “Hey we screwed up, but about a cold one on us!”

Gotta Be Moving On

It’s evident the Nelson-Atkins, while a grand location, is not working anymore as the TEDxKC venue. The post-TEDxKC reception was a madhouse in Kirkwood Hall. There was no apparent signage and the interactive aspects of last year’s event were obscured by the mass of people waiting in line for drinks at only two serving locations.

The Rest of the Week

The next several days’ blog posts will feature recaps of the TEDxKC presenters, including the two video presentations of 2011 TED talks. Rather than recapping the evening chronologically, the recaps are organized on the brief thematic explanation that was offered for TEDxKC:

  • Transparency (Tuesday)
  • Radical Collaboration (Wednesday)
  • Mind-set (Thursday)
If you were at TEDxKC, what type of experience did you have? If you’ve been to other TEDx events, how were similar challenges addressed? – Mike Brown

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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What can you do through critical personal leadership behaviors and managing relationships to make your workplace better, even when the odds appear stacked against you?

This question was an off-shoot from a recent conversation with a senior, but newly-placed, leader in a major corporation. Shortly after starting a new position, this individual was being routinely thrust into the middle of pre-existing, passive-aggressive political battles which have turned nasty through a shifting power structure.

Yuck. Been there, done that.

The conversation prompted me to think about advice on managing relationships I could offer based on having had to deal with comparable situations in the past. The advice falls into three categories:

The next three days, we’ll tackle these topics about managing relationships.

11 Personal Leadership Ideas

Today’s post includes ideas on things you can do to make sure you’re performing well on critical personal leadership behaviors. Self-assess your performance and work on improving where you’re coming up short:

  • Always act with honesty & integrity. While you’re at it, look around – you’ll be judged by the company you keep. Are you comfortable with what that judgment will be?
  • Recognize the role emotions play in business (it’s bigger than you might think), but place a premium on facts & logic. They’ll win out eventually. Are you a fact-based leader?
  • It’s vital to figure out your purpose & priorities, but you also have to be open to modifying them at some point, too. Do you know and embrace what really matters?
  • Continually challenge yourself to grow and expand by seeking out and listening to varied points of view – even ones you disagree with completely. How varied is the group you reach out to for perspectives?
  • Be distinctive. Give people lots of people lots of good things to remember you by. Is it clear to those in your organization where you’re adding distinctive value?
  • When you meet someone, along with remembering their name and asking them questions about themselves, identify one or two ways you can help them. How many people are on your current “helping them” list?
  • Shut up and listen for a minute – you hardly ever learn while you’re talking. Are you known as a listener?
  • Learn how to communicate your ideas in multiple ways so you can be ready to share them in the forms your audience is willing to hear them. Is your communication repertoire multi-dimensional?
  • Make sure you try lots of things because no one thing will work in every situation. When something doesn’t work, acknowledge it and learn everything you can to get better next time. Do you have lots of possibilities underway?
  • Constructively challenge ideas to find what’s “right,” realizing not everyone has the same definition of “right.” Are you known for a level of tact that allows you to push hard without people even realizing it?
  • Bring intensity to what you do along with passion. And work your butt off. Well?

What personal leadership ideas would you add to the list that you use in managing personal relationships?

Tomorrow, ideas for creating a stronger team with your boss. – Mike Brown


If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Is the Brainzooming mission to make everybody comfortable with their personal creativity?

I’ll admit this generalization of my favorite CreativeBloc question is in my words, not the attendee’s. His questions (“How do you make Becky more comfortable? Should we try to make a Mike Brown out of a Becky?”) relate to a story about a person (not her real name) frequently shared in my innovation presentations (you can click to read the full story).

The abbreviated version is Becky worked with our large corporation (having been at another large corporation before) and was very uncomfortable sharing her perspectives in a creative session we conducted. The reason? Her self-perceived lack of experience and the pressure of not being able to plan her creative contributions ahead of time. She wanted a creative situation that was the antithesis of how we apply the Brainzooming process. She isn’t unique in her fear of sharing her unscrubbed points of view, however, so how to deal with those like her is a great topic. Let’s tackle the two questions the audience member posed:

Question 1 – How do you make Becky (and those like her) more comfortable?

Becky would be most comfortable and perfectly happy taking orders from someone and squelching her perspective because she grew up in an environment where that was rewarded. And the corporation where she got her experience is certainly not the only one which values that from its people.  Given that, there are lots of places she could have gone and been a lot more comfortable than working with us.

Question 2 – Should we try to make a Mike Brown out of Becky?

I definitely don’t want everyone to be like me! But I do think people should be open about sharing their diverse perspectives, entertaining new ideas, and contributing to a team being more successful in new and innovative ways. If you share that perspective and have someone like her working for you who genuinely wants to expand her horizons, several things could help her grow:

Getting her involved in every creative situation possible.

This will expose her to a less hierarchical structure and a more interactive style. Seeing others share ideas – some good and some not so good – and realizing ideas which don’t get picked don’t get you in trouble would be beneficial for her.

Arming her with tools such as those which frustrated her in the creative session.

What types of tools? The ones shared here on the Brainzooming blog to aid in strategic and creative thinking. The tools here are intended to help people for whom strategic and creative thinking don’t come easily to flourish while reducing the stress they feel in these situations.

Giving her assignments in unfamiliar areas.

This would both frustrate and stretch her. But helping her understand upfront how her experience translates to and helps her in unfamiliar situations will make her a much stronger contributor.

If your Becky really wants to change, this developmental strategy should create a much more fulfilled and successful Becky!

Wrap-up

I sincerely hope you’ve benefited from these posts answering CreativeBloc questions. I’m looking forward to doing more of this based on questions from future presentations.  – Mike Brown

If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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What can you do in managing clients who love their own creative ideas?

My comment on sometimes working toward a creative objective without letting others know what’s happening, triggered this more specific CreativeBloc question about successfully managing a client (and the client’s ego) when they love their own creative ideas.

While the question isn’t specific, I’m figuring it’s referencing when there are issues with an idea’s quality, efficacy, implementation, etc. Absent fundamental issues, don’t rule out a creative idea simply because it originated with a client who loves it. (Trust me, as a client, I had agencies do this. It’s infuriating when they don’t come to the table with creative ideas that are any stronger.)

Here’s how I go about challenging an idea when somebody loves it a little too much:

Step 1 – Diagnose the Situation

Start by understanding the client’s opinions, motivations, and foundation for loving the idea. Do this through:

  • Making sure you’re completely clear on what the client thinks the primary objective is the creative idea needs to successfully address.
  • Asking questions (or simply letting the client talk) about what works with the idea. Carefully and strategically probe to see both what personal preferences AND potential concerns exist (if any) about the idea for the client.
  • Discussing how and how well the client’s idea meets the primary objective. This will provide a sense of potential areas you’ll need to support and where you can counter an idea.
  • Reaching out to others who understand the client’s thinking patterns, what’s important to them personally and organizationally, and when they will and won’t be open to compromise.

Step 2 – Analyze What You Know

Once you’d done your homework, analyze and size up the situation. Understand what elements really need changing vs. those you’d simply like to change. Figure out whether a factual or emotional argument might be more successful. Develop a couple of hypotheses on how the conversation(s) might go with the client.

Step 3 – Plan Your Strategy

At Step 3, I usually map out what my options are to try and move this type of situation to the best one for the business. This mapping out usually involves blank sheets of paper, a marker, and some time to draw out the options I’ll pursue and what could happen at each stage.  To give you a feel for what that might be like, here’s how I’d map out my strategy for trying to move a client from their favorite idea to some alternative. Based on the situation, I might give up right away (if it’s just not that big a deal) or could develop a multi-tiered case that calls attention to what’s identical in the alternative I’m approaching and try to minimize the number of critical issues where the client’s opinion has to be swayed.

One caveat – I’ve found the intensity of my counter arguments has changed since leaving corporate life. Where I had to live with the outcome of bad decisions, I was much more likely to be strident in making my case. It’s been a source of personal development working with clients, however, to realize that ultimately they have to live with the implications of an idea – positive or negative. Because of that, I’ll pull up on counter arguments much sooner than I would have in the past.

Also, I didn’t go into waging an all-out battle to defeat an idea here. That’s certainly a strategy, but it’s one worth avoiding! It’s hardly ever productive for the client or anyone else involved in the situation.

On Monday, we’ll have the final post in this series, touching on whether everybody needs to be a creative thinker. – Mike Brown

If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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How do you start enhancing innovation in a small organization?

The keynote training presentation I did for CreativeBloc was on “Taking the NO Out of Business InNOvation,” with its ideas on how to counteract ten innovation barriers. Each time I present this topic, the audience picks the barriers most relevant to their organizations for us to discuss. In that way, the presentation is never the same, covering a different five or six innovation barriers chosen by the audience.

One post-presentation evaluation thought the concepts were more suited to larger rather than small organizations, prompting today’s CreativeBloc question and blog post.

In reality, the strategies in for circumventing innovation barriers are applicable in a small organization too. If you’re in a smaller organization and want to improve innovation efforts, here are four specific steps you can take:

1. Do a self-assessment to figure out if you are personally creating NO’s to innovation.

This assessment involves examining your personal innovative approach and also asking others who would be confident (and feel safe) in telling you if the see issues with how you conduct yourself. It’s probably best to ask more general questions on where individuals in your small organization feel like they are and aren’t able to contribute new ideas.

2. Get someone outside your organization to ask questions about potential barriers.

The same questions you ask yourself and a small group about contributing and acting on new ideas in your small organization need to be asked of your entire team. Having someone external ask the questions and allowing people to respond anonymously provides the greatest likelihood of getting honest answers.

3. Assess the answers to identify your innovation barriers and ways to counteract them.

Interpret the responses openly and honestly to identify innovation barriers in your organization. Begin implementing changes by involving your organization’s people in sharing ideas. Be clear, however, about what role you’re asking them to play. Are they simply providing input which you’ll evaluate and prioritize? Or are you asking them to actually participate and own responsibility for implementing strategic fixes to the issues?

4. Watch what you say and do.

Throughout this process, display consistent daily behaviors to reinforce your words about truly wanting to create a more innovative culture. Matching what you say and do supports the individuals on your team in creating making innovative changes.

Try these 4 steps in a small or large organization when you want to experience a more innovative perspective and see better results.  – Mike Brown

If you’d like to add an interactive, educationally-stimulating presentation on strategy, innovation, branding, social media or a variety of other topics to your event, Mike Brown is the answer. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how Mike can get your audience members Brainzooming!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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