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You may want to take a seat before reading this rest of this.

An Awkward Social Media Strategy Moment, Brought to You by The Brainzooming Group

We’re going to ask a tough question about your social media strategy. An uncomfortable one that may be awkward.

Ready?

Here it is: When you take an honest look at the social content your organization produces, can you think of any reasons why your customers and prospects would be interested in reading, viewing, listening, or engaging in it?

Before you check, think about this: you’re not evaluating your social media strategy as a company insider. You’re evaluating your social content as a customer or prospect that may know very little about your company, let alone have a burning desire to learn more about it right this second. What they care about is content that is beneficial, entertaining, or otherwise good for them. End of story.

Now, go take a look and consider the question. We’ll wait while you poke around your blog, tweets, videos, Facebook updates, LinkedIn articles, Instagram images, and such.

(And BTW, if none of the abovementioned has been recently updated, the answer to the question is NO.)

*whistling while we wait*

You’re back. Great!

What’s your answer?

If it’s YES, that must mean you’ve invested time into thinking about your audiences’ interests beyond your company, creating and sharing content where you can credibly address those concerns. And that means–

What’s that?

You’re now unsure about whether YES, THEY WOULD LOVE OUR CONTENT is the right answer?

Well…we thought you might have some second thoughts about that.

Boost Your Brand’s Social Media Strategy with Social-First Content!

Whether you wavered in your YES, or you fessed up right away that the answer is NO, it’s time to download our latest Brainzooming eBook on social-first content strategy.

In Giving Your Brand a Boost through Social-First Content, we’ll show you how to quickly develop and use an audience persona to:

  1. Understand more comprehensively what interests your audience
  2. Find engaging topics your brand can credibly address via social-first content
  3. Zero in on the right spots along the social sales continuum to weave your brand messages and offers into your content

Giving Your Brand a Boost through Social-First Content shares actionable, audience-oriented frameworks and exercises.

We use these same tools to help clients develop solid, brand-building social media strategy plans and implement them successfully.

And now you can, too. At no charge. In no time at all, you’ll be back, confidently saying YES, THEY WOULD LOVE OUR CONTENT.

Download Your FREE eBook! Boosting Your Brand with Social-First Content
Download your personal copy of Giving Your Brand a Boost through Social-First Content, and start improving your social media strategy today. Ready? Let’s go!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We still come across many companies, especially in B2B, that do not incorporate a content marketing strategy to effectively reach potential customers.

The reasons they give for lagging in this area?

A content marketing strategy is not a priority for them. They doubt whether social-first content strategy will work for their companies, because they are different or have customer bases that do not care. They do not know where to start or how to sustain creating great content. Maybe they are wedded to how they have always done things, with business development people, brochures, and frequent pleading to generate referrals.

7 Signs to Invest in a Social-First Content Strategy for Your Brand

We assure them that a social-first content strategy works, even in B2B. We also offer these types of signs that it is time to invest in a content marketing strategy.

Do any of these issues sound familiar in your organization?

  • You are not generating enough leads, at least in part, because not enough people are coming to your website.
  • The don’t offer information relevant to your targets, business, and industry that match with how and what your potential customers want to discover.
  • Your organization has great stories about your people and what you do but only share these great stories inside your organization.
  • Onboarding new customers is a challenge because they lack current information about what getting started with you entails.
  • You are not continuing to learn about potential customers each time they interact with your brand online.
  • Potential customers see your competitors as doing a better job educating the market you serve.
  • You only use traditional marketing channels and media.

Let us ask again: how many of these issues apply to your organization right now?
Download Your FREE eBook! Boosting Your Brand with Social-First Content

If several of them are all too familiar, you owe it to your top and bottom lines to explore introducing a social-first content strategy as a high-impact way to build your brand. – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Following up the post about why so many mid-career marketers have missed out on becoming outstanding content strategists, Emma Alvarez Gibson, from our West Coast (or Best Coast) Brainzooming HQ, is here discussing the steps to become a content strategist and avoid marketing career extinction.

How to Become a Content Strategist and Avoid Becoming Extinct by Emma Alvarez Gibson

Once I was a creative writer.

Then I was marcomm. Then I was a copywriter. These days, I’m a content strategist.

Titles change; it’s a fact of Western business life. But in this space, that’s not all that’s changed. Take a good look at the job description for any number of content strategist positions. More often than not, we aren’t just creating content. We’re managing SEO and Google Analytics, editing images and graphics in PhotoShop and InDesign, sending and tracking emails via a CMS or two. Or seven.  

I’ll admit it was a transition I came to reluctantly, and with a fair degree of resentment. Look, I remember saying, If I’d wanted to be a marketing analyst, I’d have become a marketing analyst. Are they also looking for chemical engineers who can rollerskate and sing opera? It seemed ridiculous and not a little unreasonable. But it’s been a few years now: I think that model’s going to be calling the shots for awhile.

Earlier this week, one of my fellow writers who’s looking for full-time employment expressed dismay over these broadly-drawn requirements, ending with: When did this happen? If you’ve not had to look for a job in a number of years, it’s a fair question. There were no announcements made. These expectations crept in slowly, like fog. When the market crashed in 2008, I saw many organizations let people go and distribute the resulting wealth of tasks among the employees who were left standing. No one’s going to complain about having a heavier load when their neighbor doesn’t have a job. You make it work. We all made it work as best we could.

Nine years later, here we are with a stronger economy and the continued legacy of these career mash-ups. We made it work, and we have to continue to make it work. That means getting on board with the expectations of our chosen field. It means stretching. Learn that CMS. Take the InDesign class. Familiarize yourself with basic photo editing. Pick up a copy of Web Analytics For Dummies. Read a few blog posts on how easy SEO really is. Things have changed, and that means we have to change. To deny it, to refuse, to stay stuck in the outrage, is professional suicide.

At the start of my career I worked at a PR firm. One of the publicists there was roughly 107 years old, to my twenty-something eyes. He was pure 1960s camp, only he didn’t know it. He seemed intrigued by the fact that women were in his workplace and held positions of authority. He referred to us, the assistants, as “the girls” (despite the fact that some of the assistants were, in fact male).  Best of all? He refused to have a computer in his office. He’d never needed one before, and he wasn’t going to start now. And if he did need to look something up that wasn’t in a book, “one of the girls” could do that for him. He repeated this speech often, and everyone would smile and nod, and wait for him to leave the room so they could roll their eyes and get back to work. He was a ridiculous old dinosaur.

But I’m not.

What about you? – Emma Alvarez Gibson

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I spoke about Social-First Content at the April 2017 Social Media Strategies Summit in Chicago. As always, I left this Social Media Strategies Summit with valuable insights on social content strategy plus great ideas for further developing our brand.

Social Media Strategists at the #SMSSummit

From this Social Media Strategies Summit, I took away a specific insight on the challenge for social media strategists.

With traditional marketing communication, there were numerous clear divisions among important roles:

  • Creative vs. analytical
  • Writing vs. visual communication
  • Strategy vs. design
  • Developing content vs. publishing content
  • Spokesperson vs. reporter
  • In front of the camera talent vs. behind the camera support
  • Media creation vs. media buying
  • Offline execution vs. online / technology execution
  • Mining customer and business insights vs. audience targeting

Looking back on the combined internal and external team we assembled to market our Fortune 500 B2B brand, we rarely had one person doing both sides of any of the pairs of talents and responsibilities above. Depending on a project’s size, in fact, there may be ten or more people involved across these roles.

Social Media Strategists Face Complex Roles

Now, consider today’s social communications landscape. The divisions between the complementary roles have largely disappeared. Today’s social media strategists must be functional, if not fully adept, at nearly all these roles to succeed.

This idea started developing for me as we started using Hubspot for inbound marketing. I’m continually moving between intense analytical and creative roles in developing and executing content-based workflows.

The realization really hit me while attending a Facebook list building, advertising, and re-marketing workshop at the Social Media Strategies Summit. The presenters covered audience targeting and Facebook advertising in detail. We don’t use Facebook advertising very aggressively, so the topic isn’t one that has occupied much of my attention. As workshop presenters continued, I recalled that in the corporate world, I told media buyers that I’d ask questions, but I understood they had a knowledge base that was difficult to have without living in their world. I depended on their expertise to guide and lead us toward accomplishing our marketing objectives.

Today, however, you can’t afford to make that distinction. Outstanding social media strategists must understand Facebook targeting, advertising, and remarketing. It’s just as important as understanding the fundamentals of writing a compelling story. They also must understand everything else on the list of communication roles.

Sure, in a smaller organization, I’m now taking on many more communication roles than as a VP in a Fortune 500 organization. A team of ten no longer exists for me. Talking with other attendees at the Social Media Strategies Summit, though, it’s clear a team of ten doesn’t exist for many of them either – even within large organizations.

Why Many Mid-Career Marketers Are Dinosaurs

Put all this together, and I think it explains why I see so many mid-career marketers are dinosaurs, either limiting themselves in comfortable, but career-threatening ways (“I just do PR” or “I write but don’t do SEO”), or floundering while they rework the calculations on how much longer until they have enough money to retire.

The much smaller group is leveraging career experience and diving into social content strategy with a passion. These folks are learning to become perhaps the best-positioned marketers: they heave experience AND social sensibilities.

Seeing this landscape for mid-career marketers is why I encourage them to attend as many social content marketing events and conferences as possible. It’s the foreseeable future. If they want to be a part of that future AND get paid, they must be aggressive and prepare to work with multiple generations that grew up in a marketing world where role divisions that made sense ten years ago no longer apply. – Mike Brown

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Beyond depicting your product every which way (or depicting the equipment and people who create your service every which way), what images do you include in your brand’s visual vocabulary?

As you consider that answer, ask yourself this: Are you effectively using the best images to reinforce your brand in strategic, consistent ways?

Let’s talk about your brand’s visual vocabulary. I’ve spent a heck of a lot of time considering on design as we solidify the Brainzooming brand’s visual vocabulary through creating more eBooks on strategy and innovation (with our initial offer on branding on the way).

11 Hacks for Creating Your Brand’s Visual Vocabulary

Here are the hacks that have worked for us.

Start by unpacking your brand for inspiration. Look at all the pieces of your brand foundation (big strategy statements, brand promise) to discover the most significant words and phrases you use to describe your brand. You can do this by:

  • Combing through brand foundation materials and existing creative briefs. This will help you avoid spending time trying to recreate visual vocabulary clues that already exist.
  • Running a Wordle on web pages or other content where your brand talks about itself. This is one way to check for important descriptors.
  • Putting customer comments and open-ended descriptions about your brand through a Wordle to see what emerges on top from the marketplace’s view.
  • Reviewing your current brand visuals to identify themes or types of images that stand out based on repetition or impact.
  • Cataloging brand visuals from direct competitors and other brands that do comparable things to what your brand does. Examine what are doing to uncover opportunities to differentiate your brand visually.

Explore ideas to associate visuals with your important brand words and phrases. Start by:

  • Plugging brand words and themes into Google Images. This will help you uncover images the world associates with your brand words.
  • Searching brand words and phrases in professional photo sites to see what stock photos images exist. Careful on this: you will see lots of visual clichés you don’t want to associate with your brand.
  • Extending your search to visually oriented and image-based social sites (Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr). Look for how a broad range of people capture and categorize images linked to your brand’s attributes.

Document what you learn through:

  • Writing ideas describing the images you found. This is the approach I employed. Some of the related words were literal; others were more abstract.
  • Creating Pinterest mood boards. This is a smart alternative suggested by a design blog.:   http://designyourownblog.com/visual-vocabulary-brand-identity/They recommend pinning images you find on separate Pinterest mood boards to identify themes, then consolidating them into one overall brand mood board.
  • Finding what works for you to capture and share your results with others. I used words because my next step was taking photos to build our brand image library. Working with words makes it easier for me to avoid duplicating what others are doing. Looking at visuals as my starting points would make it too easy to potentially co-opt other people’s’ visualizations accidentally.

This is a simple approach for building your brand vocabulary, but I know it worked for us.

If you haven’t invested much time thinking about your brand and its visual vocabulary, starting simple can move you ahead dramatically! – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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If you’ve been pursuing a content marketing strategy for a few years, you have some content that worked and some that didn’t work when you first published it. You also likely have content that’s continuing to work for you in that it’s still attracting new visitors. We hope you also have a good deal of content that, even though you may have created it years ago, is still largely accurate and relevant.

Reviewing the most successful pieces emerging from your content marketing strategy up to now provides the opportunity to create new growth from your evergreen content.

We have been doing that with our own content marketing strategy along with helping clients take advantage of the same opportunity: updating, reformatting, and enhancing evergreen content so it’s primed to generate new visitors, subscribers, and audience members eager to download it.

8 Ways to Create New Growth from Evergreen Content

Here are 8 ideas to explore based on your top blog posts for ongoing traffic:

  • Use your most popular evergreen blog posts along with related ones to create a new eBook. Freshen the content by re-editing the multiple pieces and adding new content. You can also enhance the content with new graphics and design.
  • Freshen these blog posts with new infographics or graphic depictions and republish the blogs for newer readers.
  • Aggregate multiple, related blog posts and republish those as a comprehensive article on a topic.
  • Create videos to bring a more personal dimension to the evergreen content.
  • Write the opposite angle of evergreen blog posts. For example, if it’s about doing a certain number of things to accomplish a goal, write the list of things you should not do if you want to accomplish the same goal.
  • Expand a list post by writing the details behind each of the items, providing greater depth.
  • If you have a post that helps people learn how to do something or analyze a situation, turn it into a one-page download. This can make it an easy-to-use life or job aid.
  • Using a popular list post as the basis, create an infographic as a new download.

Those are all great ways to get new growth from your evergreen content.

Exploiting your most popular content in this way will make the hardest working elements of your content marketing strategy produce even more results! – Mike Brown
Download Your FREE eBook! 81 Engaging Social Content Ideas Checklist

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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On Tuesday, we were at the Kansas City Public Library to shoot videos featuring content from Brainzooming articles, downloads, and workshops. It was a whirlwind day. We shot twenty-five videos during the day to support our own brand’s content marketing strategy.

Yeah, twenty-five videos.

Videozooming, you might say.

I planned forty videos, but knew that wouldn’t likely happen.

15 Keys to Shooting 25 Social Media Videos in One Day

You might wonder how we made it through twenty-five videos in one day. Here are the factors (from my side of the camera as the person in all the videos) to enable our high volume of work. We:

  1. Partnered with a video team (Alex Bentzinger of Bentz Creative) who was flexible, and willing to work with strong direction.
  2. Picked a single location (The Kansas City Public Library) offering a wide variety of settings within one building (and we didn’t even use all the settings we planned).
  3. Made a site visit ahead of time to identify and discuss logistics.
  4. Completed a strategic creative brief ahead of time.
  5. Prepared an easy numbering system to identify and select which video to do next.
  6. Did not prepare specific scripts for any of the videos. This meant they didn’t have to be delivered perfectly; they just had to be delivered on topic and close to the time limits we set (less than 2 minutes each).
  7. Mapped where each video would likely happen so we could be time efficient within a specific location.
  8. Tried to plan for every potential delay by over-accounting for anything we might need.
  9. Organized all the props using the video numbering system, allowing for efficient placement.
  10. Selected multiple outfits and multiple shooting locations to efficiently create visual variety.
  11. Had someone directly representing the creative vision (Jan Harness, my erstwhile Creative Instigation partner) to check camera angles and how I was doing. That allowed me to concentrate on delivering messages.
  12. Had a contact at the location to help us navigate any issues we might create by shooting in places we weren’t exactly supposed to be shooting.
  13. Concentrated on the main content in the video, leaving the intros and calls-to-action for later when we have a stronger sense of how they need to work.
  14. Captured most of the videos in one take. Granted, this may be difficult to do, but it helped that we were talking about content that is familiar and core to what The Brainzooming Group does.
  15. Stuck to shooting the videos we identified upfront with only a few deviations to pursue ideas that developed during the day.

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 Expanding Our Content Marketing Strategy with Video

We’re looking forward to completing the production and expanding our content marketing strategy in a new way. We’ll be sharing the videos with clients and subscribers to expand how we deliver strategy, branding, and innovation tools for you! – Mike Brown

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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