2

It was a TOUGH blogging weekend. And by “TOUGH,” I mean on Saturday night I still didn’t have any posts written for the week. Trust me, that’s a problem; I usually try to get all five of the week’s posts started, if not completely done, by Sunday.

On Saturday night, I was definitely scouring my blogging notebooks for junk ideas to turn into blog post treasures. I kep going back to a favorite Saturday blogging resource to scour for ideas: The Wall Street Journal Review section, and especially the “Creating” column.

And once again, The Wall Street Journal came through for me.

This weekend’s “Creating” column featured Ki Nassauer, junker and author of “Junk Beautiful: Room by Room Makeovers” (affiliate link), as she pursued junk at a rural South Dakota hoarders house to look for ideas to fit into her twice-yearly magazine, “Flea Market Style,” and annual “Junk Bonanza flea market festival.”

15 Ideas to Turn Junk Ideas into Treasures

Within the story, there were fifteen ideas demonstrating how KI Nassauer turns “junk ideas” into treasures with potential. Combing through the story and looking to generalize what she does, here are fifteen ways any of us can turn junk ideas into treasures when we need a creative kick start:

1.  Space out the deadline for when you need to come up with an idea to give yourself more time

2.  Take care of your rich idea sources

3.  Take advantage of high probability idea sources

4.  Spend more time looking for other ideas

5.  Have a creative partner to stimulate ideas

6.  Always say “Yes” to new ideas initially

7.  Go where others won’t to look for additional junk ideas

8.  Change the angle from which you’re considering the idea

9.  Look at just part of  junk ideas and throw out the rest

10. Turn the junk idea upside down

11. Stack or put junk ideas together

12, Consider outlandish ideas you’d typically overlook

13, Turn the idea around to its opposite

14, Apply different support or resources to the idea

15. Pretty up marginal ideas any way you can

What do you do when you’re stuck creatively?

These 15 ways to turn junk ideas into treasures are definitely worth considering, in my view, to help get you unstuck creatively. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

7

Erica Friedman was sharing some tweets last week about bad social media practices worthy of the Fake Social Media Hall of Fame. Erica’s list of social media practices that make you want to turn off your computer was so intriguing, I asked (and she agreed) to turn it around into a Brainzooming blog post. So you know a little more about her, Erica Friedman is the President of Yurikon LLC for Social Media Without Delusion. LGBT and Geek Marketing Consultant. She writes about Social Media Marketing at SocialOptimized. Here’s Erica to take you on your tour of the Fake Social Media Hall of Fame:

The Fake Social Media Hall of Fame

Hello, my name is Erica and I’ll be your tour guide today in our newest horror tour, the Fake Social Media Hall of Fame. The name alone sends chills down your spine, doesn’t it? With so many people out there on the lookout for bad Social Media practices, it’s kind of hard to imagine that so many companies – large and small – make such egregious, horrible mistakes, but they do. And so, without further ado, follow me to see some of the very worst examples of Fake Social Media.

Making readers post a message to our friends about your business in order to be entered into a drawing

This is a classic. We all know that people can’t tell the difference between slick advertising copy and a heartfelt recommendation from their best friends, right? So cut and paste referrals make the best sense when soliciting social media.

Companies using “Likes” and Retweets to measure enthusiasm about projects they will do anyway

People love it when companies ask them for external validation for a greenlit project. It’s even better when the company solicits contributions to support their vision!

Making us “like” a company to get them to donate the $ they have set aside for philanthropy.

The company gets the tax break, of course, and a great page or two about their corporate philanthropy in their annual report. Customers get the warm feeling of knowing that 10 cents of every dollar they spent (up to $250,000) went to support the marketing for this worthy project.

Twitter accounts that post nothing of substance and never respond

Cover your children’s eyes, people. This is still the norm! Companies hop on Twitter and post links to boilerplate press releases. Make you cold just thinking about it, doesn’t it? Why do companies do this? No one really knows….

Asking followers a question then never acknowledging any answers they offer

This entry was brought to us by our Hall host, Mike Brown. Everyone loves being asked a question, then ignored when they respond! Hey, no worries companies, we know you have 237 other followers, the noise can just get too overwhelming.

Companies that ask you to tell them which of their products you like best

Yes, thank you for asking – this isjust like saying “But enough about me, how do you like my dress,” as a tactic.  Great Question. This is one of the most common Fake Social Media horrors customers have to put up with.

Celebs who explicitly tell you they’re only here to give you a glimpse of their life and tell you to not expect interaction

Matthew sent in this exhibit. Well, we know we can’t really expect reasonable human interaction from celebrities, but this feels as fake as a product endorsement. Look, even the little ones can see this is fake.

Fake Hashtags and phrases that are supposed to stimulate status posts

The mysterious hashtag… #AN2B5, #WYCN, #Whatisit….no one have been able to break their occult codes yet. What does it mean? Who was it for? No one tweeting with it will say. This mystery may never be solved, but thanks to Darryl Ayo who found this one in the wild.

When we’re asked to “Like” a puppy or a cute kid…and oh, hey, also our page.

Sorry Ma’am, here’s a handkerchief. A lot of people break down at this. It is a pretty disturbing ploy. Kelly G noted this cultured Fake Social Media (and comments that it is clever, but also shady and annoying).

Asking followers to “Like” a post to show support to some third party who did a video or person whose quote they just used.

This brutal tactic is a favorite among non-profits and cause marketers. Never mind that they didn’t “Share” that quote or Video and the original person will never receive our “like”…or that by “like”ing that post, we’ll be boosting that NPO’s numbers. Just close your eyes and look away, people. And finally, the last in our Hall of Fake Social Media, (people with weak hearts might not want to look!):

Every company that fails to talk to their customers because Social Media is Too Overwhelming.

Yeah, it’d be so much easier if customers just gave you money and never said a word, but oh well, that’s never gonna happen. Thank you for visiting the Hall of Fake Social Media. The gift shop is just through this door. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook – and if you give us the emails of five friends to add to our mailing list, you’ll be entered into a contest to win a free sticker for your car! – Erica Friedman

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

The Proliferation of Free Speech Expectations

I received an email the other day asking me to speak for a private organization because it would be really good for its audience to hear what I had to say. To APPLY to speak, I was asked to complete a multi-page form that made it clear speakers would not be paid and had better not promote any product or service during the “free speech.”

Wow.

Wow, but not unusual.

With the great free online content explosion the past few years, there’s a similar expectation that any content, including content delivered live to an organization that is being paid to host the event where the content is being delivered, should be free speech.

Remember “gunga galunga” from Caddyshack? It’s kind of like that; there will be no money, but MAYBE for your effort you’ll receive total consciousness on your deathbed. So you’ll have that going for you.

What is Fair Trade Speech?

As someone who has both done some free speaking AND asked others to speak for free, here’s an alternative, and potentially much more successful strategy, for event organizers to use:

Realize that there is value to content, even if you don’t think you have the dollars to pay for it. In those cases, be creative so you can deliver commensurate value to the speaker you’re trying to attract.

The key to implementing this fair trade speech strategy successfully is for an event organizer to understand what resources you have that might be valuable to the speakers you’re trying to attract for “free speech.”

A Fair Trade Speech Strategy Instead of Free Speech

This list is by no means exhaustive, but from speaking myself and working to book speakers, here is a list of 18 resources that could be valuable for speakers:

Website & Publication-Based

  • Include links to the speaker’s website
  • Promote the their business or whatever it sells
  • Promote/feature the speaker’s content (book, blog, etc.)
  • Incorporate logos for the their company

Networking

  • Arrange for interaction opportunities with the speaker and target attendees (whether meetings, meals, or even additional sessions)
  • Ensure introductions to attendees the speaker wants to meet
  • Provide a list of attendees for the event

Exposure & Audience Building

  • Demonstrate you are investing in a real marketing effort to build attendance for the event
  • Host a pre- or post-webinar to provide more exposure
  • If it’s a multi-presentation event, mention the speaker’s session and company in general sessions
  • Allow them to share a promo spot or advertisement for their business online or in-person
  • Handle a pre- or post-event email to attendees from the speaker
  • Video and edit the presentation they deliver at your event for their promotional use
  • Offer to do recommendations for the speaker on LinkedIn or on video

Other Financial Offsets

  • Offer to handle administrative details (i.e., filling out registration and other forms, making travel arrangements, etc.)
  • Buy the speaker’s content to give to attendees
  • Offer to produce a speaker’s handouts / promotional materials for the event
  • Provide one or more free or reduced-cost admissions for their use with clients
  • Pay for Travel and Lodging
  • Use the talents and resources within your organization to do something for the presenter (i.e. one recent conference I attended updated a speaker’s website as a trade-out)

As I said, this list of fair trade speech ideas isn’t exhaustive. But please don’t take the omission of coffee mugs, pens, and bulky and liquid gift items when the presenter is flying as accidental omissions. They aren’t. Trust me.

Give a Fair Trade Speech Strategy a Try

Go to a speaker you’re trying to sway to with a free speech (or drastically reduced speaking fee) plea and use this list (along with the background about the worthiness of your cause) to see how a fair trade speech strategy works.

I guarantee you’ll have better success with a fair trade speech strategy than sending them an application and a threat about self-promotion.

Trust me.  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

25

There have been a variety of articles about what to blog about here on Brainzooming. Admittedly though, the articles providing ideas on what to blog about are scattered over the last few years. Maybe these posts appear when I’m struggling with topics for blogs, but I can’t be sure of that.

To make it easy to find as many ideas for blogging topics as you can in one place, today’s post is a compilation of 187 ideas for what to blog about, with particular emphasis on business blogging situations. In addition, there’s another blog post with a creative thinking exercise you can use to generate your own long list of ideas for topics for blogs.

187 Ideas and Topics for Blogs

Just think, with 187 potential topics here, you could write about each topic twice and have a whole year’s worth of blog posts!

15 Ideas on What to Blog about from Your Daily Life

Just look around what you do every day for a treasure trove of topics for blogs.

93 Business Blogging Topic Ideas – Things to Blog about When You’re out of Ideas 

If you’re creating content for business, you have all kinds of stories to tell that make sense for your readers. These ninety-three possibilities for blogging topics are just a start!

10 Quick Blog Posts – Ideas for When You Need One Now

When you need blogging ideas in a hurry, look to content you already have around as a quick fix.

28 Reasons to Write a Blog Post

If you have good reasons to write, it can be helpful to revisit your reasons to generate new blogging topics.

25 Creative Blogging Topic Ideas You Could Write Today

Ready-made blogging topics you can build into a monthly editorial calendar for your blogging efforts.

16 Popular Topics for Blogs – A Completely Unscientific Study

I have no ideas whether these are really the most popular blogging topics, but if you want to go for maximum potential audience and are willing to sacrifice a little bit of adherence to a strict editorial vision, go for it!

Want Hundreds of More Possibilities for What to Blog About?

Social Media Content Ideation: Think – Know – Do

If you’re willing to do a little of the work to come up with ideas, this creative thinking exercise has been proven to generate a hundred ideas for creating content in 15 minutes! Just get a few friends, some sticky notes, and go to it! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

“How strong is my organization’s social media strategy?”

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question. Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy.”

 

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

6

Dilbert.com

When I run a Dilbert comic strip, it is because there is some core idea or concept within the comic strip that really hits home with a theme we cover on the Brainzooming blog. This Dilbert comic strip’s subject is a little bit different in that it covers something that has not been covered directly here, but is on my mind frequently. The question is how to let people know about what The Brainzooming Group can do and the value we provide clients without violating my own sense that one should never engage in bragging?

If you spend any amount of time listening in social networks, it seems that online bragging  is rampant. If you spend TOO MUCH time listening in social networks, it can make you believe that you have to jump into the same level of online bragging to keep up.

I have had many days where the temptation is to follow Dilbert’s perspective, change our messaging direction here and in other social media channels, and engage in the same online bragging game that plays out on social networks every day:

  • Crowing about vaguely detailed client wins
  • Touting significant projects that might not really be all that significant
  • Bragging about everything else happening that can be fabricated into sounding like the most important things ever to happen in business.

However, every time it seems like trying to change our messaging direction is appropriate, there is a signal from somewhere that bragging is not the right thing to do. This one came, interestingly enough, via Twitter this weekend.

What can I say, other than Proverbs trumps Dilbert and online bragging every day of the week! We’ll stay focused on accomplishing stuff, one instance of which we’ll share, with great humility, tomorrow. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

The June 2012 issue of Fast Company highlights the magazine’s list of The 100 Most Creative People in Business 2012. I will admit to not reading all of previous Fast Company 100 Most Creative People in Business lists. This year, however, having Ceelo Green on the cover (along with Purrfect) compelled me to take a shot at reviewing the entire list in-depth for the first time.

And of course, taking the time to read the whole list necessitated coming up with a way to turn the effort into a Brainzooming blog post. My starting idea was to pick one creative inspiration from each of the 100 people and turn the creative lessons into a massive 100-item list post.

After going through and identifying the 100 creative lessons that stood out for me, however, I realized the post was about 3000 words! That is typically a week’s worth of blog posts!

To not overtax you, the list of creative lessons I captured from the Fast Company Most Creative list is going to be spread out over several days in this shortened week. Each lesson references the person whose profile inspired it, along with the number they had on the list.

Today’s list includes thirty-one creative strategy lessons from this year’s list. Other days will include lessons from the list on creative perspectives, storytelling, and disruptive thinking. The hope is the lessons get you thinking even more creatively and provide ideas for enhancing your own creative efforts.

Creative Strategy Lessons from Fast Company – The 100 Most Creative People in Business 2012 List

Surround yourself with people who have contrasting thinking styles . . . then hold on.  Flavio Pripas & Renato Steinberg – Cofounders, Fashion.me (#54)

Success and determining which of your efforts will be successful are for your audience to decide. It’s a numbers game, so launch and see which things will hit.  Julie Klausner – Comedy Writer (#59)

If people aren’t buying you based on your talents, maybe it’s because they don’t how your values and goals fit with their aspirations.  Shara Senderoff – Cofounder, CEO, Intern Sushi (#63)

Start with your life problems and think through how to solve one of them if you want to make better apps (or maybe anything else).  Lee Linden – Cofounder and CEO, Karma (#67)

Really hone what you do strategically by only addressing the most important part of your customer base and quit focusing on everyone else.  Sarah Robb O’Hagan – President, Gatorade (#23)

What opportunities exist for your organization to be a creative magnet to your audiences?  – Marci Harris – Founder, Popvox (#13)

To build connections online, start with asking questions and offering your knowledge to aid others.  Claire Diaz-Ortiz – Manager of Social Innovation, Twitter (#21)

Try presenting an all-or-nothing creative vision and strategy. No room for compromise. Take it or leave it, but don’t tweak it.  Celestine Maddy – Founder, Wilder (#99)

To make your creative pitch, play out the negative things that would happen to the potential client if they don’t follow your recommendation and embrace your creativity.  Laura Mather – Cofounder /  Chief Strategy Officer, Silver Tail Systems (#16)

Even though it’s easier to sponsor another organization’s event, create a sponsorship property specifically for your organizationAbanti Sankaranarayanan – Deputy Manager Director for India, Diageo (#37)

“I don’t ever want to represent anybody. It’s my duty to enlighten people.”  Neil Degrasse Tyson – Host, PBS’s Cosmos and Radio Show StarTalk (#49)

When volunteers are able to use their natural talents and expertise (as opposed to donating time for something they’re not good at doing), you’re more likely to retain them.  Rachel Chong – Founder, CEO, Catchafire (#56)

Have a review board comprised entirely of your target market – even if that’s a group of grade school kids – to see if what you’re planning resonates with them.  Olajide Williams –  Founder, President, Hip Hop Public Health (#65)

When you’re getting started, be prepared to chase after possibilities and test cases you hadn’t imagined.  Glenn Rink – Founder, AbTech Industries (#71)

If you had one thousand “followers, friends, and fans that meant something,” that’s better than 10 million unengaged people. (Really? In pure numbers, to get the same amount of participation from 100% of one thousand people, you’d only need 1/100 of 1% participation from 10 million people.) Jared Leto – Entrepreneur, Musician (#72)

Borrow (complete) strong design contexts from outside your industry and apply them to what you do to look different. (Example: Applying Heathrow airport signage to mobile phone interfaces.)  Jeff Fong – Design Lead for Windows Phone, Microsoft (#81)

Unlikely customers will stretch your organization’s creativity in finding new ways to solve their problems.  Hannah Choi Granade – President, Advantix Systems U.S.A. (#73)

Give your team an assignment from a demanding fictional client to stretch its creativity beyond the marketplace’s expectations and extract your “creative aspirations from (y)our finances.”  – Mike Simonian, Maaike Evers – Designers, Mike and Maaike (#76)

“Seventy percent of an experience should be what consumers know and thirty percent should be surprise and delight.”  Rachel Shechtman – Founder, Story (#80)

What are you doing to make “eye contact” with potential customers virtually? And what are you doing to engage them (with their interests in mind) when they get really close?  Sam Mogannam – Owner, Bi-Rite Market (#86)

Find ways for your best customers to share their expertise and hacks with your new customers.  – Cindy Au – Community Director, Kickstarter (#82)

Head directly to where your audience is. Do not wait around at your online site. Share your content where they are and get something started.  Vivi Zigler – President, Digital Entertainment, NBC Universal (#89)

Manufacture greater scarcity in the experience you create over time to push more robust intensity, deeper interaction, and the possibility of greater participant leadership in shaping the experience.  Jerri Chou – Founder, The Feast Social Innovation Conference (#94)

What would your design process look like if the client specified every detail they wanted? Do you think that’s a level of involvement your clients are really seeking?  Edwin Neo – Founding Partner, Ed Et Al Shoemakers (#98)

Celebrate customers using your product in incredible ways. Make them the creative heroes of your brand.  Sally Grimes – Global Vice President, Sharpie (#100)

Whether in traditional or new media, people spend time with and pass-on content they expect friends will enjoy.  Ben Smith – Editor, Buzzfeed (#29)

Great advice from Magic Johnson: “It’s okay to be famous and be well liked, but you got to start owning things.”  Shaq – C’mon. It’s Shaq. He doesn’t need a title. (#74)

When trying to signal your commitment to the market, there’s no short cut to the time advantage of starting now and sticking with it.  Lourenço Bustani – Founder, Brazil CEO, Mandalah (#48)

Celebrity still counts for something so find a way to borrow the authority of celebrities to gain attention and action.  Yael Cohen, Founder – F*ck Cancer (#38)

Look and create five years ahead. What creative inputs will be important then?  Carla Schmitzberger – President, Havalanas (#97)

Look for games as the high impact form of artistic expression for decades to come.  Chelsea Howe – Director of Design, SuperBetter Labs (#41)  – Mike Brown

 

Subscribe for Free to the Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic new ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these innovation benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

5

Is your organization challenged in identifying robust social media topics to share, especially via blogging? If you are struggling with this, I’ll bet you aren’t taking advantage of an outside-in blogging strategy.

The Challenge of Creating Robust Social Media Topics

That was the challenge for someone I talked with recently who is blogging for an Alzheimer’s care facility. Because of patient privacy restrictions and the fact that people would probably rather not have to think about life in a long-term, senior care facility, the organization was struggling with what they could write about regarding the center. She asked what ideas I had for alternative blog topics.

As with so many organizations, I pointed out the primary problem was with the organization’s writing perspective.

We generally find organizations of all types just moving into social media approach it as they would other corporate communications efforts, i.e. starting with a list of topics the organization wants its audiences to know about on an ongoing basis.

While that might work (maybe) in traditional communication channels, this type of inside-out blogging approach is tremendously limiting.

Unless you have rabid brand fanatics who are consumed by your brand, you probably occupy a pretty small share of even a great customer’s interest. They have lives outside of what you do for them. They think about and are really interested in what’s going on with their lives, not what’s going on with your organization. So when you try and wedge what you care about into the relatively tiny mind share they have for you, there just aren’t that many compelling topics you can successfully cover.

Creating An Outside-In Blogging Strategy

When your organization moves into social media, you need to adopt an outside-in blogging strategy.

An outside-in blogging strategy implies you start identifying topics based on what your audience is interested in and then identifying how you can credibly address those topics. With an outside-in blogging strategy, you need to begin with a strong audience persona (or perhaps multiple ones) that describe a typical reader, their lifestyle, and their interests. As a generalized portrayal of a blog reader, the persona can be formed from market research, audience profile information, and insights from internal staff. We often create personas for our clients through a 10 question interactive exercise to create an initial persona for use in social media.

Once you have an audience persona developed, you’re in a fantastic position to start thinking about what your audience cares about and seeing which of their concerns you can address.

Getting back to the Alzheimer’s care center blogger, in our brief conversation, we described her target audience member as Joan, a married woman in her late forties with a mother exhibiting early stage Alzheimer’s. She is caring for her mother in her home, along with a couple of older kids. From that background, we generated five new topic ideas within a minute:

  • Managing financial issue for older parents
  • Meals that are fast to prepare
  • Providing full-time care without losing yourself
  • What to do when you can’t do any more than you are doing right now
  • How to make sure your parents are getting the best care

You can easily imagine all of these topics being of very high interest for Joan. While none are specifically related to the Alzheimer’s care center, it has a basis to address them, either with its own experts or through reaching out to others as guest contributors.

And most importantly, this list was generated in a minute using an outside-in blogging strategy. If we’d have kept going, this list of ideas would have grown to 100 within 15 minutes.

Getting Started

If you haven’t adopted an outside-in blogging strategy for your organization, now is the time to start. And if you need assistance getting an outside-in blogging strategy started, call The Brainzooming Group. We’ll get you going on it very quickly! – Mike Brown

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading