Blogging | The Brainzooming Group - Part 16 – page 16
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It can be easy for bloggers entering the holiday season to slack off on regularly publishing the company blog. Bloggers may neglect the schedule for publishing on the company blog because of the struggle with what to blog about to effectively cut through all the holiday-related messages. Blogging neglect can also come from seeing readership and other activity metrics on the company blog decline in previous years as customers turn attention to the holidays.

Rather than getting out of the blogging routine, go out of your way to deliver highly valuable content between now and early next year. When it comes to what to blog about, turn your blogging attention to publishing content that helps customers better prepare for the end of the current year and the start of the next.

10 Ideas for What to Blog About Now

For you bloggers, here are ten ideas for what to blog about in the coming weeks to deliver highly valuable and time-sensitive content for your customers:

  • Important end of year issues your customers need to address
  • Critical start of the year issues your customers need to address
  • Regulatory changes taking place within and around your industry that will have an impact on customers
  • Your organization’s perspective on market conditions in the coming year (perhaps based on input from talking with multiple customers)
  • Ways customers (and non-customers) in your market can maximize the value they get from products and services in your business category in the coming year
  • Background on new products and services you’ll introduce to address customer needs / demands in the coming year
  • Summarized updates on relevant market research you’ve conducted that would be beneficial for your customers to understand
  • Seasonal and year-end reflections from you or key people in your organization
  • An annual recap on what’s happened in your marketplace the past twelve months
  • Tips for hitting the ground running in January

That’s just a start on what to blog about for the turn of the year. You can definitely incorporate other specifics from your business to expand the list.

Make Your Year-End Blogging Evergreen

While the blog topics above are time-sensitive, you can write the blog posts to be more evergreen (i.e., extending their timeliness into the early weeks of next year, if not subsequent years).

Bloggers can make  company blog posts more evergreen by:

  • Referring to “this year” and “next year” instead of specific year numbers
  • Covering general principles and linking to more time-specific background sources
  • Prioritizing perennial advice/information and concentrating time-specific content in only certain blog posts
  • Refreshing blog posts early next year to switch out or update time-specific content

Keep Blogging in the Weeks Ahead

While daily blog readership may have lagged in previous years, you can use these ten ideas on what to blog about to keep great content coming for readers who are still reading now – and for those who will catch up with your valuable blog content in the first part of next year too! – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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One of the most frequent questions people ask me is, “How do you come up with the creative inspiration for what to blog about five days a week?”

My answer is I pay attention all the time for creative inspiration and start to process experiences through a very specific filter: “How could this interaction, story, factoid, image (or whatever it is) fit as a Brainzooming blog post?”

When you go through life expecting EVERYTHING to provide creative inspiration for what to blog about, you see potential topics EVERYWHERE.

For me, the bigger challenge is finding the time to turn all the creative inspiration into blog content both of us (you and me) would be interested in reading.

I’m not a fast writer, and I’ve gotten even slower through distracting myself while writing and incorporating more SEO-oriented steps than when the Brainzooming blog started. The result is many ideas never make it into completed blog posts, although some will show up even a year or two later. Never underestimate the value of historical creative inspiration!

Brainzooming Creative Inspiration – What to Blog About

Several months ago, I wrote a Brainzooming post detailing the creative inspiration for the previous thirty posts. Some of the points of creative inspiration are the same, but many differ from the previous article on what to blog about:

1. You are inspired by stories and challenges others are sharing on Facebook (Being Thankful for the Blessings in the Challenging Parts of Life)

2. Something already written can be recast and made more helpful than when it was originally written (Current Clients, New Opportunities – Five Ideas to Discover New Growth)

3. You’re trying to motivate yourself to improve on things that bother you about yourself (Distracting Yourself – 19 Ways to Undermine Your Success)

4. There’s a keyword phrase generating favorable blog traffic, and it’s time to add more blog content on the topic (Strategic Thinking Exercises – 6 Characteristics the Best Ones Have)

5. Many intriguing articles on a topic are taking up space in your web browser, and it’s easier to summarize them in a blog post than bookmark the links (10 Articles on Creativity Lovers, Haters, Branding, Insights and Storytelling)

6. You’re trying to solve your own business challenge, and you use a blog post to think through your best options (Combat Client Block – 8 Ways to Beat Client-Specific Creative Block)

7. A sales call surfaces an issue you know others are contending with as well (Social Networking, Personal Relationships & 7 Content Strategy Questions)

8. There’s an opportunity to combine content only tangentially related to your blogging subject with a different angle to make it relevant (Innovation Success – Innovating, Strategy & Pissing Off People)

9. Marking an anniversary by sharing lessons learned (What to Blog About and How – 25 Blogging Lessons from 5 Years and Number 22: 25 Lessons Learned (or Reconfirmed) in Year Three Away from Corporate Life)

10. Creating a compilation of previous articles as a resource for readers and yourself (Project Management Techniques – 21 Articles to Better Manage Projects)

11. There’s an opportunity to link your subject to a current news topic (Political Concession Speeches – Why Are They the Best of the Election Campaign?)

12. A great, frequent guest blogger has written a post (Innovation Success Through Planning, Preparation, and Organization by Woody Bendle and Number 24 Creative Thinking Exercise – SCAMPER around KC by Woody Bendle)

13. It’s possible to turn too much time watching TV into a lesson-oriented blog post (Creative Process – 5 Creative Ideas with a Twist for Product Design)

14. A bizarre situation has been staring you in the face for years, and you finally figure out an angle to turn it into a blog (Brand Experience, Glass Houses, and Naked Shower Guy)

15. A great, new guest blogger has written a post – after you made a request on Twitter (The Top Three Don’ts of Brand Building by Julie Cottineau)

16. A current event provides an opportunity to write something more outrageous than you would ever typically address (Zombies and Vampires – Strategic Perspectives on Their Popularity)

17. In the course of a phone conversation with a potential client, you list out all the items for a blog post (Strategic Planning – 7 Questions for Avoiding Strategic Management Failures)

18. It makes sense to share some behind the scenes info on a social media strategy you use (Social Media – 5 Tips to Sharing an Evergreen Blog Post)

19. You’ve developed a guest post for another blogger you can rewrite into fresh content for your own blog (Brainstorming Tools – Drawing on Big Creative Ideas)

20. A new approach to what you do is still in the creative thinking stage, and you’re interested in getting reactions to it (Strategic Thinking Exercise – Black Swan Events in Your Plan)

21. You share a lesson you don’t particularly like that you’ve had to learn to like and embrace (Creative Inspiration – Creative Ideas from Your Daily Life)

22. See number 9

23. A conference event you attend reveals a real-life factoid serves as a case study (Television Program Ideas – How Many Ideas Per Television Series?)

24. See number 12

25. A social media rockstar is pissing and moaning about something that isn’t a problem, and you want to respond in a longer format (Social Media – 19 Content Strategy Ideas from a TV Network)

26. You’re having a conversation with someone who tells you something about what they are doing, and it would be a perfect guest blog post (The Importance of a Passion Project by Alyssa Murfey)

27. Another blogger’s intriguing blog title wasn’t matched by an intriguing post, so you write the post the other blogger should have written (Brainstorming Ideas – 10 Signs You’re Done Brainstorming)

28. You’ve written enough Twitter posts to create a decent compilation (Twitter Topics on @Brainzooming – This Tweet Is for You)

29. You sit through a speech that’s so bad and lacking in beneficial information your only choice is to write about how bad the presentation is (Keynote Presenter Advice – Don’t Do These Things)

30. You’ve had to develop a new skill that your audience can benefit from developing as well (Social Media Content – 7 Ways to Repurpose What You’ve Written)

What creative inspiration does this list suggest about what to blog about for your brand?

– Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining social media ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your social media  strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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It’s been some time since we ran a post such as this. Here are 10 intriguing articles that have been occupying tabs on my web browser for longer than I’d care to mention. Too good to lose track of; not enough time to give each one a full blog post. Even with sharing these 10 articles on creativity, I still have way too many tabs open. At least this is a start . . . enjoy the creativity from around the web!

Lovers and Haters of Creativity

The Characteristics of Creative Thinkers – Some of the most popular posts on the Brainzooming blog are about creative thinking skills and kids and creativity. Here’s another take on both topics, all rolled into one from The Seeds Network.

Creativity and IQ, Part I: What Is Divergent Thinking? How Is It Helped by Sleep, Humor and Alcohol? – Why is this article from The Creativity Post here? Did you read the title? Nuff said.

The Bias against Creativity: Why People Desire but Reject Creative IdeasJason Harper forwarded this link and suggested a blog post response. Usually, I’m all over Jason’s suggestions on these because he has great sensibilities. I may still respond to this one with a full blog posts, so I haven’t rejected it; it’s simply in the future blog file.

Creativity in Branding

You Can’t Force Love: Why Developing a Great Brand Eludes Process – From the Kaleidoscope blog, this is an ode to iteration when it comes to developing brand identities, positions, and messaging. Yup, brand development is definitely not a one and done strategic activity; be prepared for cycling through several times to get where you need to be with your branding.

Branding Events, A New Source Of Revenue For Social Networks – As an event guy at heart, a social network guy by client demand, a revenue loving guy by necessity, and a NASCAR guy (which is mentioned here) through career experience, this article has it all for me. If you’re interested in even one of these four topics, this article from Lighthouse Insights is worth a read.

Bringing Creativity to Strategic Insights

Inside the Secret World of the Data Crunchers Who Helped Obama Win – An overview from Time magazine on how big data shaped strategies and decisions for the Obama campaign. Only big data would tell you that George Clooney and SJP have the same impact, just on different coasts.

Best Buy Needs To Implement Something Like This To Stop People From Showrooming – Intriguing look at how the retail environment can be dramatically changed. It’s going to take some brands with some big you-know-whats to do this. We suggested a very comparable long-term strategy to a consumer product goods client last year. Their you-know-whats weren’t very big, apparently. Just sayin.

CVS and Ford: Putting Designers in Customers’ Shoes – literally– From Andrea Meyer’s website, “Working Knowledge,” this is a fantastic example of putting yourself in the situation of your customer if you really want to generate creative strategic insights.

Creativity and Storytelling

Dolan and Colbert talk about faith, humor at Fordham – This story from National Catholic Reporter is here because of how it’s reported (although I am admittedly a Cardinal Dolan fan). With traditional media limited for this event, NCR turned to social media coverage to construct its story about an evening of discussion with Stephen Colbert and Timothy Cardinal Dolan.

12 Imperative Must-Dos for the Serious Blogger– This SlideShare presentation from Jay Baer is packed with solid advice, including the recommendation for bloggers to check out inboundwriter.com. If you want to be all serious about your blogging, you should click through Jay’s presentation. – Mike Brown

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic new ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these innovation benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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4

For some people, it is a natural move from in real life personal relationships to social networking. Their social networking success can come from an instinctive or learned knack for what and when to share the right amount of personal information to make positive connections without boring people or seeming too self-obsessed.

Others, who take a more cautious approach to their lives and personal relationships, cannot imagine WHAT they could share online about themselves while still maintaining a professional image.

Social Networking by Sharing Kitteh Pictures

I was having this discussion with a cautious business owner recently who has social media presences established for the business, but struggles with what to share to both establish professional expertise and make personal connections via social networking. My point was even in a business-to-business setting, people buy from other people. PERSONAL relationships matter in real life business development, and they also matter when you are engaged in online social networking for business development.

You should have seen the reaction though when I mentioned the strategy behind sharing pictures of our cat Clementine (who a Twitter friend dubbed the “Director of Enthusiasm”) on Facebook.

Within a few questions, we found some topics that definitely have the potential for sharing on social networks. The issue is whether this business owner will become comfortable weaving in a more personal feel to social media content.

7 Content Strategy Questions for Building Personal Relationships

If you are struggling with integrating personal information into your social media sharing, here are seven questions you can ask yourself to identify potential personally oriented topics for social media sharing:

  • What do you think, know, and believe?
  • What are your favorite sources of compelling news and information online?
  • What do business associates and clients know about you personally?
  • What do you share about yourself when you meet someone at a networking event?
  • What is intriguing about you and your professional and personal interactions?
  • What is visually intriguing about your life – both professionally and personally?
  • What brands, stores, and places do you talk up to people because you appreciate them?

Certainly, you have answers to these questions. If you are struggling with sharing personal information via social media, the answers to these questions can start to form the basis of your personal content sharing strategy.

Social Networking – When and How Much Personal Information

The next big questions to ask and answer are how soon and how much to share personally?

You have to do what works for you, but if you are reluctant to share personal information online, the answers to these last two questions are “sooner than you think” and “more than you want.”

So now that all the questions are answered, it is time to started sharing and building personal relationships to let people get to know you better in an online professional setting! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Saturday, November 10, 2012 marked the fifth anniversary of the Brainzooming blog. These five years have produced, in round numbers, more than 1,300 blog posts and 400,000 words of content on strategy, creativity, innovation, and social media topics.

Sometimes I love the Brainzooming blog. Sometimes I dread the Brainzooming blog. But I learn from the Brainzooming blog weekly, whether those are blogging lessons I actually do or those that sound wonderful, but I never seem to implement fully.

Here is a mix of each of those types of “what to blog about and how” blogging lessons from the past five years, with a particular emphasis on ones that have not warranted full blog posts yet.

What to Blog About and How – Do as I Do Blogging Lessons

  • Use WordPress for your blogging platform. You cannot beat the availability of (typically free) WordPress plugins to add features to your blog.
  •  Unless you are dedicated to creating and maintaining (WordPress) blogs, work with someone who works with WordPress all the time to support and update your blog.
  • Just start blogging and do not wait for things to be perfect. Start writing, and you will get better at writing as you write more.
  • Even if only for yourself, have in mind an audience persona for your blog along with a simple guideline for what topic areas will be a focus for your blog.
  • Learn about the fundamental elements of SEO and keywords as early as possible. Scribe is a great tool to help you improve at SEO as you write and publish blog content.
  • Take pictures all the time of things and situations that fit with your blog topics. It is nice to have the flexibility of a variety of images to choose from for a blog post.
  • Learn some basic skills on photo editing software so you can use your images multiple times and still keep them fresh.
  • List posts are fantastic. List posts attract readers, and if you do them right, they are relatively easy to write in a pinch.
  • Keep a separate document file of all your blog posts.
  • Read a few strong blogs regularly, but occasionally (i.e. once every week or two), and swap different blogs into the rotation. If you read anything too frequently (at least for me), it is easy to fall into the possibility of mimicking them.
  • Do not forget about your old posts whose content is not time sensitive. These blog posts can still have value, and people will be interested in them.

What to Blog About and How – Do as I Say, Not as I Do Blogging Lessons

  • Start with a reasonable and regular blogging schedule. Increase it only for a solid business reason.
  • Perform sufficient keyword research upfront. The keyword research can help focus your topics and writing while generating greater visibility for your content sooner.
  • Have a hidden blog where you feel comfortable experimenting out of sight of your regular audience.
  • The most important blogging rule? ABW . . . Always be writing.
  • The second most important blogging rule? ABCI always be capturing ideas.
  • You can increase your blogging efficiency if you use a kitchen timer and limit how long you spend writing a blog post. This approach might not improve your quality though.
  • Do not share too much without asking for something back from your audience. If you do not recognize the value in the content you share, how can you expect anyone else to recognize it?
  • Build more landing pages with downloadable content. When you are offering strong content, having targeted landing pages is a vital tool for capturing business leads.
  • Create more videos. Videos add personality and identity in a blog.
  • Back up the separate document file of all your blog posts frequently.
  • Do not become too enamored with only one social networking platform to share your blog content. Spread yourself thinner across multiple social sharing sites.

Other Thoughts on What to Blog About and How

  • My best analogy for what it is like to write a blog? Writing a book with a very loose outline and no real motivation to write the book in sequential order.
  • What nobody seems to tell you is the actual writing of a blog post may be less than 50% of the time to publish the blog post. SEO, editing, graphics, tagging, and setting up the social sharing seem to be easily half of my time on a post.
  • Much of what you read about blogging (especially anything on how easy, lucrative, fast it is) is either bullshit, total hype, or not applicable to what you are trying to accomplish. Don’t hesitate to consider this article in that group as well; ultimately you have to do what works for you, irrespective of what anyone else says! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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A blog post about taking a TV network programming approach to shape your social media content strategy led to questions about tips for what content to re-share on your social media sites.

When it comes to the decision to re-share evergreen content (i.e. a less time sensitive blog post), step one is making sure you have a big enough catalog of evergreen content. Depending on how active your content strategy is going to be on social media sites, you could need fifty blog posts or hundreds of blog posts.

If your evergreen social media content is in place, it’s vital to make sure you’re sharing social media content relevant to your audience at the time it is being shared. You can’t just throw content out there on social media sites your audience will view as old, boring, and irrelevant.

5 Tips to Sharing an Evergreen Blog Post

Here are five tips you can use to increase the probability your social media content still feels “fresh” when you re-share it on social media sites:

1. Share what your audience is searching for currently

If people are finding their way to your blog for specific topics and looking at a particular blog post right now, that is a good indication that particular social media content is still valuable. Check Google Analytics for recent active keywords and review the blog posts getting the most attention right now. We use the Jetpack Sitestats plug-in to monitor what blog posts are getting attention on a real-time basis so we can share links to what’s hot from an audience perspective right now.

2. Share what’s in the news right now

Current headlines are another great indicator of evergreen content to share. If a topic is hitting the business or popular news, it’s your opportunity to feature relevant social media content. For example, we published a blog post when Coca-Cola introduced a short-term redesign for the Diet Coke can. When Coca-Cola later announced the Diet Coke redesign was becoming permanent, it was a natural blog post to share again.

3. Share evergreen content related to what you are currently publishing

Suppose you are running a new list blog post on a particular day. As you share the link for the new content throughout day, alternate links to other blog posts related to your new content. For instance, on the day this post publishes, we’ll be tweeting links on community management and the programming like a TV network blog post. By taking a holistic view to your content strategy in this way, you can create a content theme for the day.

4. Share what the crowd is pointing to that’s popular right now

If you have vibrant Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, or other presences on social media sites, you can readily scan them to see what topics people are writing and asking questions about currently. Check especially for topics and content others are re-sharing most frequently in your social media streams. The Google Trends is another option to see what searches are most popular currently. Take advantage of these cues to find comparable topics among your archived social media content to match current interests within your social media circles.

5. Share content that hasn’t been but should be popular

Just as certain TV shows are critically acclaimed but struggle to find an audience because of timing or other factors, the same can be true for a particular blog post. Perhaps an older post on our blog you really believe in didn’t receive the attention you thought it should have when originally published. Take advantage of future opportunities to share the post again and see if it catches on with the audience at a different time.

What other tips do you use to shape your content strategy and decide what evergreen content to share?

If you are sharing archived content from your blog as part of your content strategy, what tips and input do you use to make sure blog posts you’re sharing are relevant right now? Do you take any other steps to freshen evergreen content you share? We’ll put together a follow-on blog post about steps we take to keep even evergreen content fresh.  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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1

A fundamental part of effectively building a social media network is positively and beneficially interacting with other social media users. Another part is being able to successfully  ask members of your social media network for assistance and participation – either collectively or individually. Doing this successfully directly relates to the social media etiquette you display when you’re making a big social media “ask” of your audience.

There are clearly better and worse ways to ask your social media network for action. And based on requests we have received lately, there are a variety of basic social media etiquette practices social media users (even prominent ones) don’t know, selectively follow, or choose to blatantly ignore.

11 Keys to Seeking Social Media Network Help

When it comes to seeking help from your social media network . . .

  • If you solicit people in your social media network to leave comments on your new blog post, be prepared to check for pending comments throughout the day and APPROVE them as they are made.
  • When asking your social media network to “Like” or “Follow” your new social media presence, start sharing content in advance so your social media presence looks like an active one.
  • If you’re going to direct message someone to prompt them to retweet your important new social media content, make sure the link you include works – every time.
  • When you request guest blog posts, offer some direction on who your audience target is and provide activation support within your social media network after the guest post appears.
  • If you want to become a guest author on a blog, first show up and participate on the blog (or other social networks where the blogger is active) instead of simply making a request out of the blue.
  • When writing a guest post for someone else’s blog, don’t send the same post to multiple bloggers.
  • If you ask for a review of your book, webinar, or speech, be willing to adapt to a blogger’s writing approach (and actually supply the discount code you promise will be available to the blog’s readers).
  • When throwing out a question on Twitter or Facebook to other social media users, be ready to interact with members of your social media network who respond.
  • If you insist on sending an auto-direct message to someone who newly follows you on Twitter and include a question in the tweet, follow them back beforehand so they can respond to you with a direct message.
  • When asking someone within your social network to do something for you, do something for them first.
  • Use “please” and “thank you” liberally – even if it means sending someone another message (or two) to say them.

There are certainly more than these eleven social media etiquette tips, but these provide a solid foundation for cultivating greater social media network success.

What other social media etiquette tips would you add?

What social media etiquette miscues do you see when people make requests via social media? And what successful social media etiquette practices do you appreciate within your social media network?  – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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