Blogging | The Brainzooming Group - Part 33 – page 33
0

Today’s blogging learnings relate to interaction. The lessons are best characterized as being similar to a magnet – there’s an attractive force, with both positive and negative elements.

Attractive Force

Blogging has revealed personal interests that have attracted learning opportunities, even from people who already knew me pretty well. Through people sharing information prompted by blogging, I’ve learned about:

And that’s simply a sample of the varied and very cool stuff others have shared because of blogging.

Positive

I’ve received much positive feedback about blogging via email, comments here, and personal conversation. Through Google Analytics, I can see hits worldwide – audiences I’d never reach. One regular reader commented recently that there are “some very good posts” here; I asked him to let me know which ones since it’s tough for me to pick them out! The most intriguing comment was from a Chicago reader reminding me the blog earns me one minute of his time every day and that “counts for a lot.” It certainly does, and I sincerely appreciate it!

Negative

The negative is we still haven’t uncovered how to get more of you participating in dialogue and sharing the blog with others, especially via posts or other web references. As a group, you seem fairly quiet online, at least around here.

Blogging how-to’s suggest regular, strong, original content as a growth key. We have regularity, but if you see modifications to content or style that would compel more of your own participation, getting your thoughts would be great. In one comment, Chris Reaburn pointed out similarities between indie bands and bloggers in this regard. You are the “small initial audience” and through the level of interaction you create, you can directly impact the work.

Feel free to exercise your influence by sharing thoughts on three questions to help shape the blog in the next year:

  • What topics have been most beneficial to you either professionally or personally?
  • What do you think about featuring shorter posts – do they still offer enough worthwhile information? (Results to the recent poll suggest that brevity is still preferred; Creative Quickies were at the top of the preference list.)
  • What are your suggestions for continuing to grow readership?

Thanks in advance for any comments you provide. And here’s to another year’s worth of sharing strategy and innovation ideas!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0


Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

2

I’m a heavy-handed editor – ask anyone who works with me. At least I go through many rounds of editing my own stuff also (Exhibit A is at the right). Writing so much for the blog, however, has forced a more structured approach with specific editing rounds. Here are steps I’ve learned that may help you be a faster writer:

  • Keep something around to capture ideas – don’t let even remotely good possibilities evaporate.
  • Mine, combine, dissect, twist, and edit ideas into a first draft. Get a complete version down irrespective of whether the sentences are complete.
  • People want shorter material so start with a word limit. Five hundred words used to be my maximum. Based on reader preferences, I cut it to 300, with many under 200.
  • Edit to tighten the prose on the next pass. Also consider rearranging elements to make it work better. Surprising how often an article’s conclusion becomes its new intro following this editing round.
  • Run a spelling / grammar check to check the word count and help catch typos. Print it, read it aloud, read it backwards – anything to see it with fresher eyes since you’ve been through it several times.
  • Shorten it even more – reduce the word count by 10 to 20% on the final edit. It may seem challenging, but the result is invariably stronger.

Now you’re set to start your own blog and crank out 60,000 words by next year!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

Today’s the first anniversary of my initial blogging foray. Thanks for being a loyal audience and offering suggestions throughout for improving it!

The blog started after a presentation on corporate blogging by Jessica Myers of Garmin Industries. She said that anybody could start a free blog in 10 minutes. Several weekends later, I started with the expectation of writing twice weekly. It was intended to create something instructional beyond presentations, provide more permanent life to strategy and innovation ideas, and maybe form the basis for a book.

Looking at the initial objectives, the blog has:

  • Solidified material that’s later found its way into my strategic thinking presentation
  • Caused me to be a more succinct writer
  • Provided material for putting together a creativity book

The only challenge has really been creating dialogue with all of you. You tend to be a “quiet” group. In the coming year, I’d love to get more interaction going and continue building this community.

This week we’ll cover lessons from the blog that can benefit you – even if you’re not blogging. And there will be a favor or two asked of you along the way! Check back tomorrow for more on writing lessons learned.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

With the blog’s first anniversary in the offing, I’d really appreciate your quick input on the types of posts that you find most intriguing.

Let Me Know What You Think

Check out the poll on the upper left of the blog and provide your point of view on where the subject matter heads in the near future. There are five categories to select from (and you can choose multiple ones).

Click below to see examples in each category:

As always leave a comment or send me an email to let me know – what would you like to read more about in the blog?

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading