Facebook | The Brainzooming Group - Part 12 – page 12
12

At last week’s “Creating Fantastic Blog Content” presentation and webinar, we discussed events as treasure troves of content creation. While I offered this comment as a “headline” during the presentations, we did not cover much about what specific content creation opportunities exist for event organizers.

To answer questions about what all these content creation opportunities might be at events, here is a starting list of twenty-five you can consider as possibilities when planning and conducting (or even attending) your next event, conference, or gathering:

  • Assemble live tweets into presentation recaps.
  • Create a Slideshare presentation filled with photos of great slides from conference presentations.
  • Video attendees at the event talking about why they decided to attend the conference.
  • Video attendees on what they are learning and the value they are getting from the conference.
  • Video attendees about why people not at the conference should attend next year.
  • Get all kinds of digital photos – presenters, content, party pics, etc.
  • Video exhibitors on what their companies can do for attendees.
  • Get presenters to share additional details, insights, or thoughts about their presentations.
  • Video two presenters talking with or interviewing one another.
  • Write articles from the content that you have captured on video.
  • Create lists of the best tweets from the event.
  • Invite attendees to write blog posts or share other content they have created.
  • Grab images from videos you have shot.
  • Turn photos and video snippets into a closing video for the event.
  • Have attendees answer polling questions and report the results.
  • Turn audio from video interviews into podcasts.
  • Create a presentation highlights Slideshare with three high impact slides from each presentation.
  • Have a question per day that you video attendees answering.
  • Recruit a social media team to generate content from more perspectives within the event.
  • Ask open-ended questions on the pre- and post-conference surveys about the issues, opportunities, and learning needs attendees see. Turn the results into articles.
  • Ask attendees what questions were not answered and answer these in future blog posts.
  • Invite presenters to submit blog posts or articles for the conference website.
  • Solicit attendees for guest blog posts they prepare after the conference and give a prize to everyone who creates content.
  • Organize small group dinners with industry leaders and video compelling conversation snippets at these gatherings.
  • Video industry experts and luminaries doing brief invitations (and by “invitations,” I mean “commercials”) suggesting your audience sign up for your blog emails and feeds.

Here is one additional suggestion about all this content you create at your event: Do not make the mistake of running all of it during or immediately after the event. Space the conference content out, perhaps over even several months.

While it is tempting to upload 50 pictures to a Facebook album because it is easy to do all at once, distribute the content over time so you do not inundate your audience. There is the added benefit of filling out your editorial calendar with less time-sensitive content. When you are under the gun to publish on a regular editorial calendar, being able to pull out a video or blog post from your event last quarter can be a huge relief!  – Mike Brown

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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1

If you are in Kansas City and not attending Social Media Club of Kansas City (SMCKC) breakfasts, you’re missing outstanding social media-related speakers and content monthly. The September presentation from Scott Monty at Union Station was fantastic, and October’s Social Media Club of Kansas City breakfast (back at the Kansas City Cafe) was equally strong, featuring Mike McCamon, Chief Community Officer from Water.org.

I’ve been struck by the organization’s compelling online strategy since meeting Erin Swanson from Water.org at one of the first breakfasts I attended. Talking informally with Erin several times in the last few years, it’s been clear water.org is all over inventive social media strategy.

Social Media Automation

At last Friday’s SMCKC breakfast, Mike McCamon provided a “Social Media 700-level” course on how Water.org uses social media automation, under the banner “Donate Your Voice,” so Water.org Twitter and Facebook fans can share their social network feeds with the organization. Beyond “one-to-many,” Mike characterizes the strategy as enabling “none- to-many,” since fans don’t have to do anything once authorizing Water.org to use their social media broadcasting capabilities.

This video from the presentation features the strategic thinking behind Donate Your Voice and the social media automation strategy. I told Mike afterward that being a strategy guy, he had me right away by starting with not one, but two X-Y charts.

How Extendable is Donate Your Voice?

Does Donate Your Voice have a fit beyond non-profits? Mike discussed Water.org considering sharing the technology with non-competitive non-profits and licensing it to for-profits in exchange for a financial commitment to Water.org. Even if it does (or others develop similar capabilities), the Donate Your Voice concept will likely need an option for more user intervention.

When you care about what you share in your social network channels, I can’t imagine surrendering my “voice” to any organization without an option to say yes or no on a particular message.

Would you want that type of message-specific approval, or are you okay with donating your online voice unchecked?

I’ll be covering Donate Your Voice in greater depth for the December issue of The Social Media Monthly magazine. I’ve been writing monthly articles since the magazine’s introduction earlier this year. If you’re in a Barnes and Noble in the next few days, you still have an opportunity to pick up the October issue of The Social Media Monthly where I wrote a cover story on the Google+ vs. Facebook battle.  – Mike Brown

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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8

It has now been about 2 years since I left corporate life to make The Brainzooming Group a full-time effort. Last year on this date, I shared 25 lessons learned and reconfirmed during the first year of The Brainzooming Group. Here are 25 more lessons from year two away from corporate life, although it’s hard to say some of them didn’t originate in year one!

  • Peoples’ priorities, especially in corporations, change quickly. Things can go from hypercritical to off the list in what seems like minutes. Inside the corporation, you may not even notice. As a vendor, it can be crushing.
  • A lot of corporate life was filled with meetings. The absence of so many needless meetings creates a lot of time in your day.
  • Keep experimenting with pricing and other parts of the marketing mix ALL the time.
  • Taking a “friends and family” approach to business development is a good start, but it is hardly sufficient.
  • Get out of the office and see people.
  • I’d underestimated the business potential of Facebook. Now, I’m playing catch-up.
  • Go for unique, higher-risk opportunities than predictable, lower-risk opportunities that promise they’ll get better.
  • R.E.M. did things in their own way, at their own pace, in their own style. That’s a pretty solid long-term business strategy.
  • I’m not sure if absence makes the heart grow fonder, but 24/7 togetherness doesn’t.
  • If you’re willing to surrender your will to God, he’ll put you in the places you need to be.
  • When you’re in a big corporation, the last thing you may want is dealing with more people. When you’re an entrepreneur, that changes.
  • Frugality, frugality, frugality.
  • A one-tier cost structure is a recipe for failure at worst or stagnation at best.
  • At some point, you have to stop thinking you’re average at everything you do while still maintaining a strong sense of overall humility.
  • There were things I could afford to stay out of or not do in the corporate world that I can’t afford to avoid anymore.
  • You can’t over-estimate the impact of being able to stay calm during challenging times.
  • As difficult as it might be, you have to let go of previously strong professional relationships that turn non-reciprocal. Really cultivate the ones that do remain vibrant, though.
  • Go out of your way to meet new people you would never have expected to meet. Go out of your way to re-meet people who pass through after long absences. You never know how your life will be changed by it.
  • Don’t wait for someone to join you. Go ahead and try it yourself.
  • As important as a tight team is, go to unfamiliar people for reactions, because you’ll get a much more accurate perspective.
  • It’s okay to take the risk that something you walk away from will hit really big for someone else. You can’t pursue everything.
  • Life is really incredible if you allow it to be incredible. Many times “incredible” materializes because you haven’t directly intervened in mucking up the ordinary.
  • It’s easy to slide backward – really easy. If you’re going to slide backward, do it consciously, not accidentally.
  • You need a business model, not just an idea. A business model can sustain you for an extended period of time. Ideas have to be continually replenished. Continually replenishing ideas for an extended period of time can drain you beyond recovery.
  • Wait for it.

Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your brand strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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21

Several events (handling online community management for a new organization, returning to a bar where I was a DJ in college, creating a cross-school Facebook group for kids of my era in Hays, KS after a high school reunion) have all put me back in the heart of thinking about and handling start-up online community management.

Online community management means creating a content strategy, delivering intriguing social media content (be it created, shared, or repurposed), interacting with and building an audience, and doing it all on a consistent basis to keep people coming back and bringing friends with them.

You might think you are not doing community management, but if you are on Facebook or Twitter, community management is either what you are, or should be, doing.

Thinking back on my DJ years, organizing intriguing content has fascinated me for a long time. The successful practices for being a DJ or an online community manager are very comparable. In both cases, you are bringing together and arranging the best mix of content from various sources to create an intriguing content stream. The content can predominantly originate with others, but has to include self-generated content, too.

Approaching Online Community Management as a DJ Would Do It

I’d been thinking about the online community manager as DJ model before Angela Dunn’s great post on the topic of “thought leader as DJ” last year, so these recent events prompted me to put my personal spin on the topic (that’s only a pun for those older than 30, btw).

Here are 10 ways a DJ would approach online community management:

1. Create a signature style for your content

Decide what content topics you’ll feature, how you want to intrigue your audience, and the actions and reactions you want audience members to display.

2. Develop a source list

Continually cultivate websites, RSS feeds, and people that offer intriguing content in your focus areas. It’s okay to share content from popular sources, but there’s distinct value to sharing information off the beaten path. (As a side note, launching a community outside our industry has demonstrated a value for those stupid Paper.li online newspapers: when very topic-focused, Paper.li newspapers can be a decent source of industry content to share.)

3. Have an adaptable content approach

Know what you plan to program (using even a loose editorial calendar), but be willing to share more of the content that’s working right now.

4. Listen for new material all the time

Use all kinds of searches, tools, interacting with others, etc. to listen for and find new pockets of great material to share and promote. Watch the reactions to content and new trends developing. Alter your content stream to take best advantage of what you’re observing.

5. Participate and learn from other successful online community managers

I “got” Twitter initially by observing how others we’re using it. I’m back to doing that with Google+ now. Continually pick up new ideas based on how others are using social media well.

6. Be an engaging personality

Be enthusiastic, inviting, interested in your community, and “smiling” in an online kind of way. Doing these things attracts and grows a follower base.

7. Use and share content properly

Make sure you include proper credit for the original sources. Go ahead and paraphrase and paraquote, but don’t lift copy someone else created. Link to original sources and credit where you’re finding compelling content.

8. Solicit audience feedback

Ask easy-to-answer questions and continually check on what people think about your content and community. Also, find out what they enjoy in other online communities where they spend time.

9. Pace your content sharing for the right mood and type of community

Don’t just blast content with no time for people to enjoy it. At the same time, don’t begin with lots of material, and then disappear for extended breaks. Match what you’re sharing to where the community’s mood is and where you want to move it.

10. Bring variety to what you share

Mix in your own material in the midst of sharing compelling items from others. Whether on your blog, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, etc., create an intriguing social media content stream that’s distinctive and special. That means being anchored in what you do well while also incorporating new areas to stretch yourself and your audience.

What guides your community management?

Those are 10 areas I’ve been pulling from in my DJ experience to manage new online communities. What guidelines from your experience guide you as your build and cultivate an online community?  – Mike Brown

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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7

I’ve been thinking about this post for about a week, but getting the new Facebook features which are trying to replicate Google+ caused me to write this list last night of 7 things I hate about Google+ for sharing today.

The 7 Things I Hate about Google+

1. The incredibly low on-screen information DENSITY (grey area)

Google+ Screenshot (Sept 20, 2011)

I usually love white space, but Tweetdeck has trained me to want (and Edward Tufte has made me come to expect) much higher on-screen information density than Google+ delivers. There’s just WAY TOO MUCH white space begging for something on-screen to read.

2. The incredibly low on-screen information DIVERSITY (red area)

On Twitter, I hate when someone dumps so many tweets at one time that they occupy a disproportionate amount of on-screen space. That happens on Google+ all the time. And it doesn’t count to say that lots of the room is taken up by comments or shares. They get no diversity credit from me. That screen space all gets charged to the original person sharing the content (see number 7).

3. Google+ has clearly gotten inside Facebook’s corporate head

Facebook Screenshot (Sept 20, 2011)

As I updated on Facebook Tuesday night, the introduction of Google+ actually caused me to spend MORE time on Facebook to understand the differences and roles of each. Now that Facebook seems hell-bent to close the gaps, my intrigue for Facebook is “going down, down, down” at an alarming rate. I mean look at the two screen shots: other than I went to high school with one of the guys on the Facebook screen, they’re nearly identical.

4. Sparks, from a search perspective, suck

I don’t quite get why a company that lives and dies by search, puts Sparks forward under its brand. Sparks searches are like the results from the ultimate in an unsorted, very dated, off-topic search engine. Sparks are so far off-brand, it’s pathetic.

5. Google+ is still pimping invites

As I’m writing this, Google+ is now open to everyone, but real estate on my screen is still being taken up with an invitation to send invites. I don’t need to send invites; get the text off my screen.

6. It appears to be blocking terms

I tried to write an update last week which mentioned Facebook twice in a couple of paragraphs, and Google+ wouldn’t let me share it. When I removed the Facebook mentions, the update was published with no problems.

7. Google+ has turned the user experience into a rock concert

You know how at a rock concert a singer will yell something like, “How you doin’ tonight Kansas City?” The singer doesn’t care about how any one person is doing. The singer just wants a lot of cumulative volume with unintelligible individual responses. Doesn’t that sound exactly like a high profile social media rock star asking inane questions on Google+ to trigger bunches of comments they never respond to. Yup, it’s all the same.

What do you think?

Where do you come out on this battle? Do you care? Are you a Facebook user who’s having to deal with the collateral damage of the war with Facebook? If so, what do you think about that? – Mike Brown

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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2

I had a great opportunity to participate in a panel presentation Wednesday at the Association of Fundraising Professionals, MO, Mid-America Chapter along with Dave Svet of Spur Communications and Patrick Sallee of the American Red Cross, Greater Kansas City Chapter. The topic was “Can Your Smartphone Be a Smart Fundraiser? Mobile fundraising and other “Smart” Strategies.” Short story, we all approached it from a social networking and mobile strategy angle, with insights applicable to nonprofits and for-profit businesses both.

The Other Speakers

Patrick Sallee covered actual case studies of “text to give” from his career. Patrick addressed the upsides (significant impact opportunities when tied to an attention-getting event) and downsides (set-up and ongoing costs, long payment processing cycles, challenges in reaching sufficient scale). The net of his remarks was that “text to give” yields on average about $1000 for a charity, which makes pursuing this social networking strategy not widely viable.

Dave Svet provided a solid overview of the technical opportunities and challenges of mobile giving. He covered smart phone trends that will make mobile giving more seamless domestically in a few years. Near-term, Dave underscored the importance of a mobile-enabled website and the opportunity to develop app-like features within a web environment at significantly less cost than creating custom apps.

Mobile Content Marketing Strategy

I presented on content marketing strategies for nonprofits before fund raising even starts. The mobile content marketing ideas were tied to a social networking impact model The Brainzooming Group uses. The social networking impact model is focused on maximizing audience interests, how to create compelling communication within a mobile strategy, and methods to employ social networking most effectively in sharing an organization’s stories with its key audiences.

Here are five key social networking points from my section on mobile content marketing:

  • It is no surprise that spouses, relatives, friends, and experts are more important to consumer brand decisions than having a Facebook or Twitter page. Two big opportunities exist for brands in social networking, though. These opportunities are to share content and a personality which moves a brand into a friend or expert role and to provide content to individual social network members they can readily and credibly share within their own social networks.
  • Develop relevant personas for important audiences to improve addressing audience needs and interests with your content. Write content for individuals (not for the masses) about what your organization thinks, knows, and does.
  • In a mobile environment, compelling communication requires brevity, direct calls to action, integrated messaging, a mobile-enabled website, and easy ways to invite people to deeper information.
  • When making the move from solely traditional communication vehicles (annual reports, quarterly newsletters, events, etc.) to include social media, take advantage of the opportunity for greater frequency to share a more complete organizational message. Quarterly Facebook status updates do not cut it.
  • In addition to sharing stories of the people and personalities associated with your organization, make it easy for your audience to share your content via social sharing.

What Questions Does this Prompt?

Beyond the talks from Patrick Sallee, Dave Svet, and me, there were some intriguing questions from the group on social networking, technology, and content marketing. Look for a future post addressing audience questions from the Association of Fundraising Professionals session on social networking and mobile content marketing strategy. Do you have any questions you’d like to throw in the mix before that post? – Mike Brown

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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