0

A blog post about taking a TV network programming approach to shape your social media content strategy led to questions about tips for what content to re-share on your social media sites.

When it comes to the decision to re-share evergreen content (i.e. a less time sensitive blog post), step one is making sure you have a big enough catalog of evergreen content. Depending on how active your content strategy is going to be on social media sites, you could need fifty blog posts or hundreds of blog posts.

If your evergreen social media content is in place, it’s vital to make sure you’re sharing social media content relevant to your audience at the time it is being shared. You can’t just throw content out there on social media sites your audience will view as old, boring, and irrelevant.

5 Tips to Sharing an Evergreen Blog Post

Here are five tips you can use to increase the probability your social media content still feels “fresh” when you re-share it on social media sites:

1. Share what your audience is searching for currently

If people are finding their way to your blog for specific topics and looking at a particular blog post right now, that is a good indication that particular social media content is still valuable. Check Google Analytics for recent active keywords and review the blog posts getting the most attention right now. We use the Jetpack Sitestats plug-in to monitor what blog posts are getting attention on a real-time basis so we can share links to what’s hot from an audience perspective right now.

2. Share what’s in the news right now

Current headlines are another great indicator of evergreen content to share. If a topic is hitting the business or popular news, it’s your opportunity to feature relevant social media content. For example, we published a blog post when Coca-Cola introduced a short-term redesign for the Diet Coke can. When Coca-Cola later announced the Diet Coke redesign was becoming permanent, it was a natural blog post to share again.

3. Share evergreen content related to what you are currently publishing

Suppose you are running a new list blog post on a particular day. As you share the link for the new content throughout day, alternate links to other blog posts related to your new content. For instance, on the day this post publishes, we’ll be tweeting links on community management and the programming like a TV network blog post. By taking a holistic view to your content strategy in this way, you can create a content theme for the day.

4. Share what the crowd is pointing to that’s popular right now

If you have vibrant Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, or other presences on social media sites, you can readily scan them to see what topics people are writing and asking questions about currently. Check especially for topics and content others are re-sharing most frequently in your social media streams. The Google Trends is another option to see what searches are most popular currently. Take advantage of these cues to find comparable topics among your archived social media content to match current interests within your social media circles.

5. Share content that hasn’t been but should be popular

Just as certain TV shows are critically acclaimed but struggle to find an audience because of timing or other factors, the same can be true for a particular blog post. Perhaps an older post on our blog you really believe in didn’t receive the attention you thought it should have when originally published. Take advantage of future opportunities to share the post again and see if it catches on with the audience at a different time.

What other tips do you use to shape your content strategy and decide what evergreen content to share?

If you are sharing archived content from your blog as part of your content strategy, what tips and input do you use to make sure blog posts you’re sharing are relevant right now? Do you take any other steps to freshen evergreen content you share? We’ll put together a follow-on blog post about steps we take to keep even evergreen content fresh.  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

1

Becoming an official sponsor of the Olympic Games is expensive.

But what if your brand wanted to APPEAR to be an Olympic Games sponsor without paying the typical sponsorship fee? Is that even possible?

Yes, it is possible, if you are adept at guerrilla marketing (affiliate link) and are willing to try a sponsor bomb strategy. A sponsor bomb, similar to a photobomb, involves getting near enough to a major sponsorship property to be able to bask in the attention it generates – without running afoul of the sponsorship property owner!

How do you sponsor bomb the Summer Olympics?

Here is how we applied guerrilla marketing principles to create a sponsor bomb for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at my former company, a global business-to-business transportation services provider.

The Background for the Strategy

Guerrilla Marketing - Sponsor Bomb the OlympicsOur company wanted to send a message to a focused target audience of employees in our headquarter locations – Kansas City, MO and Cleveland / Akron, OH – and the broader local communities. The message was our company was still viable, had a global perspective, and had the stability to be associated with a major event such as the Summer Olympics.

The guerrilla marketing approach involved a series of 4 identically-structured television commercials starring our own employees from around the world. Each commercial delivered the same message and was featured in heavy rotation during local advertising breaks for the NBC affiliates within the Summer Olympics in our headquarter TV markets. While we skimped on metrics (because of a very tight budget), the overwhelming feedback of people in both markets was a belief that we had to be a major sponsor of the Summer Olympics.

4 Keys to Sponsor Bomb a Major Sponsorship Property with Guerrilla Marketing

From our experience sponsor bombing the Olympics, here are our takeaway guerrilla marketing lessons to developing and implementing a sponsor bomb strategy:

1. Figure Out All the Places Where the Event Will Be Visible to Your Target Audience

If you’re going to sponsor bomb successfully, identify everywhere the sponsor property will be visible – in-person, traditional media, online, etc. Once you have done that, figure out which venue is most likely to overlap with where your target audience will be viewing or participating in the event.

In our case: The opportunity was to buy time in the local TV affiliate breaks since it was affordable and allowed us to target audiences in Kansas City and Cleveland/Akron.

2. Mass Inferior Resources to Maximize the Impact

When you are using a guerrilla marketing strategy in place of a traditional sponsorship it probably means you have inferior resources relative to traditional sponsors. The difference is though, you may have proportionately more dollars to put into marketing the sponsor bomb effort. You need to orient the marketing mix for your sponsor bomb strategy to have the biggest possible impact when you can be active, even if it means passing up having a presence elsewhere / at other times.

In our case: We put our advertising investment into only the two (eventually 3) local markets with 15-second TV commercials. These shorter commercials were less costly, allowing us to buy approximately 100 or more airings  in each market coming into and leaving local break in the Olympics. The result was if you were in either local market, we seemed to “own” the Olympics broadcast because of the high frequency we achieved.

3. Keep Your Hands Really Clean

With a sponsor bomb strategy, you don’t want to run afoul of the sponsorship property owner or other sponsors. That means it is vital to understand what you can and cannot do, say, and represent relative to the property.

In our case: We could not show the Olympic rings, but the legal team said we could say “Summer Olympics” without naming the host city of the Olympics.

4. The creative execution should be more strategic than creative (and it must be incredibly creative)

Creative execution for a sponsor bomb has to integrate strongly with the rest of the sponsor bomb strategy to maximize the impact with the target audience. The creative has to match up with the objectives, the budget, and how you are deploying resources. To make the sponsor bomb work, creative that generates a big “wow” without supporting every aspect of the strategy is just a wasted opportunity.

In our case: To stay in budget, we had to go with lower production values. The idea of featuring employees played into lower production costs, plus it put the target audience right into the Olympics advertisement. The repetitive structure allowed us to feature more employees (4 different versions of the ad) while not compromising the advantages we were getting from the high frequency we were able to achieve with 15-second advertisements (featured below).

Have you tried or seen a similar guerrilla marketing sponsorship strategy?

There are multiple ways you can employ this type of non-traditional sponsorship strategy. As we’ve discussed previously, The Brainzooming Group used a variation of this approach to create the Building the Gigabit City sponsorship. While it may be more challenging strategically than a typical sponsorship approach, the rewards for your effort can be tremendous! – Mike Brown

 

     (Affiliate Link) 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

4

Seeing painful examples this week featuring social media completely devoid of real brand personality means it’s time to create a simple social media personality audit.

Social media content with no brand personality?

Social-Media-Personality-AuditExample 1: The Financial Institution

There’s a TV advertisement running in Kansas City for a financial institution’s new blog targeted at women. The TV advertisement features five women in a kitchen, supposedly talking and sharing in a very “it’s just us girls” way. Apparently by “just us girls” though the financial institution means “in a very stilted, formal, artificial, and awkward” way.

When you check out the financial institution blog, the “stilted, formal, etc.” sentiment carries throughout its site. The five women in the ad obviously represent five personas for the blog. But instead of depicting real people, the five women are characters with phony descriptive names tied to each persona’s life stage and some variation of the financial institution’s signature color.

Let’s just say the dearth of activity on the financial institution blog suggests nobody feels like hanging out in the virtual kitchen to talk and share with these phony personalities.

Example 2: The Vet Clinic

Then yesterday, after visiting our vet to pick up the cats, the vet clinic popped up on Facebook with a status update about a new blog post. I clicked the link and scanned the last three vet clinic blog posts. All three blog posts were about products to keep away from your pet. Helpful information, without a doubt. But the information appeared (based on the blog design information) to be generated by a company specializing in on-hold call systems. As a result, the vet clinic blog posts had the personality one would typically associate with an on-hold call.

This is in stark contrast, however, to a very friendly and warm vet clinic where vets, techs, and other staff have shown us tremendous support as one cat faded and get genuinely excited and have a special nickname for our other cat when she visits the cat clinic.

10 Question Social Media Content Personality Audit

These two social media examples so devoid of brand personality sent me looking for definitions of individual personality and brand personality to spur my creative thinking.

Based on the words suggested in the Wikipedia entries and our experience with good and bad social media content, here are 10 questions the financial institution, the vet clinic, or your brand can ask to see whether you are putting enough personality into social media.

Apply this 10 question social media personality audit to see how any social media content from a brand does. Give two points for every “Yes” answer and no points for every “No” answer:

  • Is there an overriding emotion this social media content suggests?
  • Would you know the attitude employees of this brand embody from its social media content?
  • Are the behaviors your people display when they go above and beyond to help customers clearly suggested?
  • When you see this content, does it appear as if it could be shared in a genuine conversation or letter exchange with someone who knows you?
  • Is there a level of familiarity suggested that customers or potential customers would expect when they dealt with your employees in person?
  • Does this social media content have a spark of imagination and spirit?
  • Will the information shared via social media pass the “straight face” test?
  • Does the tone and delivery of the social media content treat the reader with clear respect?
  • Will a reader walk away from this social media content enriched both intellectually and emotionally?
  • Would people legitimately want to spend more time with the person delivering this social media content?

Let’s see how you did!

Grading the Social Media Content Personality Audit

Here’s how to score a brand on the social media personality audit:

  • 18 or Greater: “A” – You are delivering personality throughout your social media content
  • 16:  “B” – You’re showing more personality than most are in social media
  • 12 – 14: “C” – Social media content you produce might reflect aspects of your brand personality, but it could easily be missed
  • Less than 12: “Fail” – Your social media content probably has drab stock photos (even for what should be employee images), copy that should be on your website and not your blog, and status updates that read like short-form press releases

Who is doing it right?

If you want to see a local brand that has really impressed me of late by oozing its brand personality in social media content, check out the Kansas City store, STUFF on Facebook. It’s located on my favorite creative block in Kansas City, and in the face of a lot of generic retail social media content, STUFF shows you can showcase your brand personality in an imaginative way every day.

Oh, BTW, there is a caveat

Most of the creative questions, strategic thinking exercises, and innovation-inducing tools shared on the Brainzooming blog spring from real-life organizational situations and have been tried and tested.

This social media audit hasn’t, at least in this form. It’s all stuff I fully believe and espouse, but this attempt to share it in a new way isn’t client tested. Because of that, I’d love to see you apply it, and let us know if you think it’s appropriately categorizing the good and bad of social media content you see. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

0

This may or may not become a new feature on the blog, but if it does, Saturday Surprise will feature an intriguing demonstration of creativity floating around the Internet. This first video comes from Google+ and Jeffrey J. Davis, who shared it Friday afternoon.

As the headline says, this Saturday Surprise is what happens when you combine Mark Zuckerberg, Game of Thrones, an X-Acto Blade, a ruler, free time and a unique vision from Malaysian artist-architect Red Hong who “likes to paint, but not with a paintbrush.” If you’d like to learn more about Red Hong’s “Facebook” depiction of Mark Zuckerberg, you can visit her website for pictures and the story.

Enjoy your first Saturday Surprise!  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic new ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these innovation benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

2

Getting started can be a big hurdle. Sometimes, it’s all about simply starting anywhere you can start now.

There’s such a thing as a rhetorical statement where somebody makes a statement, and they don’t really want a smartass response from you.

If you’re sharing your incredible Spring Break resort vacation pictures on social networks, how about sharing some everyday crappy weather pix too?

60 is the new 30 because when you hit 60, you still have 35 more years to work before you’ll be able to retire.

When someone’s apparently listening to you, don’t rule out that they are thinking, “I have no idea what he/she is talking about…”

The stupidest thing said to me the past month? “You’re from Kansas City? Kansas City, Kansas or Kansas City, Oklahoma?”

I don’t know how to spell the sound a spit take makes.

No matter how hard you look, there are no self-writing magazine articles.

Just because you CAN do a video doesn’t make it um, necessary to do, if, um, you can’t do one without saying, “um” a lot.

I wonder if Bradley Pitt would have been as successful if his parents had named him “Armand”?

Little kids aren’t the only ones that love dinosaurs. Seems like some business executives do as well given the way they cling to extinct business models.

What could you do tonight to be clearer & more focused tomorrow? And by “you” I mean “I.” And by all the rest, I mean, “I have no clue.”  – Mike Brown

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

6

YouTube is ruining Super Bowl advertising!

I wrote that statement during the 2011 Super Bowl along with a few reasons why, but never turned it into a complete blog post. After taking part in Max Utsler’s sports media class at The University of Kansas last week as Max discussed his ongoing research on Super Bowl advertising and after watching this year’s Super Bowl advertising, the pieces I needed to fill out the blog post fell into place.

So let me say it again: “YouTube is ruining Super Bowl advertising.”

What do I mean by that?

As my dad, who spent nearly all his career selling television advertising at a TV station in Hays, KS, is quick to remind me, a good television advertisement has:

  • A simple, understandable message
  • Creative that supports the message
  • Repetition of the message in some manner, either within the ad or through repeated airings
  • Clear information on how to take action on the message

In the days when the only place to see a television ad was on television, advertisers strayed from this formula at their own peril. Successful television advertising routinely delivered on all four – even very memorable Super Bowl ads.

What’s Happening to Super Bowl Advertisements?

Fast forward to the dramatic changes taking place with Super Bowl advertising in the age of big dollars for TV spots and free space on YouTube and other social media channels. Here’s what’s happening:

  • Super Bowl advertisements need to be seen many times online (i.e. on YouTube) after the Super Bowl (and increasingly before) to justify the upfront investment.
  • There’s a presumption (largely true) that people will only invest time to watch Super Bowl ads online that are entertaining.
  • It’s easier to craft a potentially entertaining Super Bowl ad which minimizes the advertiser’s message in favor of heavying up on cinematic storytelling, visual engagement, emotional triggers (humor, lust, drama, etc.), and suspense.
  • The frequent result is a crop of Super Bowl advertising with only tenuous connections to simple, understandable, repeated messages and clear calls to action for Super Bowl advertisers.

Because of these dynamics, we now have a slew of poorly done “television ads” for the Super Bowl that:

As I mentioned in yesterday’s Brainzooming blog post, I received a true appreciation for these disconnects when viewing 2012 Super Bowl advertising with a group of people in a home party setting. Super Bowl advertising which depended on subtlety to carry the day didn’t. That’s why the H&M ad with David Beckham worked; it got its simple message (H&M, David Beckham, Bodywear) across clearly and multiple times in 30 seconds.

But here’s the flipside of YouTube ruining Super Bowl television ads.

The good part of these dynamics is that advertisers are now taking a sponsorship strategy to their Super Bowl investments. This sponsorship strategy link is what clicked for me in Max Utsler’s class the other day at The University of Kansas. Max discussed all the things advertisers are doing to showcase Super Bowl creative as they try to activate their “sponsorships” through multiple channels to maximize the ROI from Super Bowl advertisements.

With a sponsor’s view of the Super Bowl, smart brands are getting the full advantage from their investments. YouTube viewing is an important foundation to these increasingly integrated marketing communications and brand strategies.

As was discussed on #SocialChat last night, there are still many integration opportunities brands aren’t seizing in social media. If H&M had featured a Twitter chat with David Beckham as a follow-on to its commercial, I have a feeling my laptop computer would have been ripped from my hands by some of the women in attendance!

This represents a huge integration opportunity for Super Bowl advertisers next year to go beyond simply asking people to watch their Super Bowl ads online. – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading

9

The 2012 Super Bowl advertising experience was very different for me this year. For the first time since the dawn of Twitter, I wasn’t sitting by myself, focused on the computer and television screens with little on my mind but moderating #BZBowl via social media and Super Bowl ads.

No, this year I was actually invited to a party at the home of a long-time friend and Brainzooming blog reader who was nice enough to put up with me live tweeting about Super Bowl advertising during his party. And for the 2012 Super Advertising experience, instead of #BZBowl, we participated in #SBExp with Jim Joseph, so even my moderation duties for the Super Bowl Twitter chat were dramatically lessened.

When you’re among other people talking, cheering, and moving about the room, the criteria by which you judge Super Bowl advertising change. It’s a lot less about isolated strategic and creative criteria, and much more about what gets the crowd’s attention.

Because of the change in my experience, it would be difficult to guess what I’d have chosen as the best Super Bowl advertising under my recent years’ viewing situation. Instead, I’ll offer my perspectives based on what stood out either to me or to the eight to ten people in the room. Remember too, I’d purposely seen only a few ads before the game, and have tried to stay away from other “best of 2012 Super Bowl advertising” articles before getting my thoughts down here.

The Best of the 2012 Super Bowl Advertising Experience

M&M’s Ms. Brown

This to me was the first really strong Super Bowl ad. In what were big themes during the night, it mined previous ads (the M&M’s out mingling with people looking to eat them) and used a hint of skin (or chocolate in this case) to catch attention. The M&Ms Super Bowl ad, however, was able to integrate with past creative while not being detrimentally saddled with it. The spot introduced Ms. Brown (yeah, I know, the name may have caught my attention) explaining her brown color didn’t she was naked, without a coating. The red M&M saw her from across the room though and took it as a cue to get nekkid and start the party. A product everybody knows with some sexually-oriented playfulness that was fun, not pandering, and scored some early points. Maybe GoDaddy.com should look at M&M’s agency for next year.

GE Turbines

I’ll be interested to see if this clearly business-to-business oriented spot from GE shows up on anybody’s list. Maybe it’s my business-to-business roots, but I thought GE did an effective job of making a play for itself as an innovative, important ingredient brand in a memorable way by demonstrating its industrial turbines are key components of creating Budweiser. Sure the second half of the commercial looked like Budweiser Super Bowl advertising, but it was exactly this integration with its much more prominent Super Bowl advertising customer that provided this spot’s memorability. As an example, there was another GE business-to-business oriented spot, but I have no recollection what specific category is was portraying. With GE Turbines, even some industrial skin might be able to sell hard.

H&M – David Beckham

I can’t tell whether I’m in the target market for the H&M David Beckham ad, but I’d seen a print version of the ad earlier in the afternoon in the newest edition of Men’s Health, so give them points for an integrated campaign. Of any Super Bowl ad, this spot featuring a very tattooed, only underwear wearing David Beckham, received more tweet attention than anything all night.

I initially said this ad was payback for all the GoDaddy.com female skin revealing Super Bowl commercials over the years, but having gotten through the rest of the ads in the game, this ad was the most memorable for me. Why? Go back and watch it. Within the first few seconds, it blatantly says H&M, David Beckham, and underwear (okay it says Bodywear, but it’s underwear to me). And you know what happens at the end of the ad? It blatantly says H&M, David Beckham, and underwear. There’s a winning formula there (beyond simply that “skin sells”) that advertisers and agencies have forgotten for Super Bowl ads, but more about that tomorrow.

NFL Timeline

It’s the NFL’s show, so why shouldn’t they do a great Super Bowl ad. Not sure that the NFL has to sell much, especially since they came out of what could have been a crippling labor situation completely unblemished this year, but the combo of history, familiar images, and iconic music worked well, as usual, for the NFL.

Hyundai – Get Your Pulse Going

The Hyundai “Think Fast” spot worked for me amid the variety of auto-related Super Bowl ads (although the Fiat Super Bowl ad got laughs and interest from all the men in the audience). The message of get your pulse going tied in an inventive way to the advertisement’s storyline and an underlying message about the car and the Hyundai brand.

2012 Super Bowl Advertising that Didn’t Work for Me

Pepsi with Elton John, Flavor Flav, and a “Who and the hell was that singing?” Sandwich

Making a movie is obviously a popular approach for Super Bowl ads. When you make a movie that reinforces the brand and message (last year’s Chrysler 300 “Imported from Detroit” Super Bowl ad, but not so much this year’s Chrysler ad) ,  it’s very effective. When you’re Pepsi and you make a movie with Elton John, Flavor Flav, and a singer in between who very few people seemed to recognize in a medieval castle setting, maybe a movie wasn’t your best strategic choice. Pepsi did do something right though, because I knew from early on it was a Pepsi commercial even though I don’t remember what the cue was that signaled it was a Pepsi commercial.

Chrysler – It’s Second Half in America

This one was getting a lot of raves on Twitter last night, but it didn’t work for me. The reason it didn’t work, however, may have been largely because of my viewing environment. Left to mainly go by visual cues, I recognized the visuals early in the spot as Chrysler and Detroit, which put me in the mind of last year’s incredible Eminem Chrysler300 video (my personal favorite). I immediately started to try and listen for the voice, and see where this spot was heading. But by the time it was visually clear Clint Eastwood was the voice, I immediately went to, “What does Client Eastwood have to do with Detroit?” From what I could see and hear, it wasn’t clear as an “America” ad. Going back to watch it again this morning, it’s clear that it starts with America, but that start was completely lost from my viewing vantage. Big lesson here that came up on some other Super Bowl ads: consider the worst possible conditions your audience might experience your creative. Another lesson: after a big win, consider moving on to a completely new game than going back to defend a slightly off version of how you won before.

 

Me, Just Being Snarky about 2012 Super Bowl Advertising

Coca-Cola Polar Bears

Okay, it was cute to see the Coca-Cola Polar Bears, and I guess there was one spot that was picked based on what was happening in the game. I’d be hard pressed to tell you which Coca-Cola Super Bowl ad it was, although I suspect it was the one where the Polar Bears clearly had more than 12 bears on the field, since that seemed to be a favorite miscue in the game along with illegal grounding from the end zone and an illegal huddle (watch yourselves in there guys). Anyway, if you were a Coca-Cola brand manager, how could you resist throwing at least ONE white labeled, save the polar bears Coca-Cola bottle into those Super Bowl ads?

 

Chevy Trucks

In this Armageddon scenario, Chevy Trucks offered up Barry F’n Manilow, mentioned Ford more than its own brand, and so prominently featured Twinkies that I thought it was a Hostess ad until the end. Huh?

Battleship

The Battleship ad looked like the revenge of the IBM Selectrics. #YoungPeopleAskYourParents

 

Teleflora – Valentine’s Day

I was watching with a largely male crowd, and let me tell you, there was SILENCE during this ad, just as during the David Beckham ad. Clearly, it was that whole skin selling hard thing again, because at the climax of this Teleflora Valentine’s Day Super Bowl ad, all the guys were ready to order flowers and wait for the paybacks. Talk about ROI from advertising.

 

What Did You Think?

This post is a work in process, as I’m both writing it and publishing updates as I go (the reason why I don’t usually write newsy articles here – I don’t like working to tight deadlines). As a result, check back for more updates during the day. But in the meantime, what did you think about the 2012 Super Bowl advertising? What worked, didn’t work, or just made you get all snarky during the marketing event of the year? – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

 

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInPinterestGoogle Plus

Continue Reading