1

What better place for adults to meet than LEGOLAND Discovery Center?

On Saturday morning, I met there with Chris Reaburn and his son Clarkson. Traveling through Kansas City for just one day, I suggested meeting at LEGOLAND Discovery Center so we could talk while Clarkson played.

Why this suggestion?

Because adults unaccompanied by kids (i.e., me) aren’t admitted to LEGOLAND other than one night a month. As a result, I haven’t been able to go there since its opening.

The idea was a great one, in theory, but too late to buy tickets online, we found ourselves in a 3-line deep queue of people during (according to the LEGOLAND website) a high demand period.  Arriving 15 minutes after opening didn’t help; I learned (secondhand) from someone in line the wait from where I was would be at least 60 minutes. And that would be just to get to the door to go inside and buy tickets.

I’m NOT good at waiting in lines, so I let Chris know if Clarkson wasn’t up for the wait we could leave without ME throwing a fit about not seeing LEGOLAND.

Clarkson was a great sport, however, during our hour wait outside. He amused himself with LEGO bricks from several bowls placed throughout the line. Clarkson and Chris also navigated several trips across lines of waiting families to get child-sized water cups from a centrally located water stand.

After making it inside to buy tickets, we faced another wait for elevators to the main floor. This extended pause involved a photo (bomb) opportunity for kids with life-sized LEGO characters. The elevator ride’s conclusion put us in the LEGO Factory – learning about how LEGOs are made, seeing the LEGO master builder workshop, and finding out how much we weigh in LEGO bricks (let’s just say more than 30,000).

After the LEGO Factory, we were in yet another line for a Kingdom Quest ride. At Clarkson’s request (or maybe it was a Chris decision), we skipped the ride to finally enter the main LEGOLAND Discovery Center attraction.

Managing Customer Expectations – 5 Lessons for Brands that Make Customers Wait

Before getting a chance to skip Kingdom Quest, Chris and I both commented how the LEGOLAND Discovery Center didn’t manage customer expectations even remotely as well as Disney does at its attractions. It was then we realized LEGOLAND HAD started managing time expectations once we got to the elevator room. That was way too late though – starting more than hour after we arrived on property. Admittedly, there were very few tantrums in line from kids. Yet LEGOLAND is missing opportunities to shape customer expectations and extend its brand experience more positively for one-third of our three hour visit.

If you’ve ever been to a Disney park, it is clear Disney is a master of managing time expectations to make time pass more quickly than you’d expect. From our weekend experience, LEGOLAND could learn a lot from Disney and other brands that manage time well. So not from a management science perspective (which frankly was NOT one of my favorite MBA classes), but from the experience of standing in too many lines in my life, here are five ideas LEGOLAND (or any other brand that queues up customers for a prolonged wait) should consider:

1. Start managing the brand experience as soon as you can / as soon as you need to start

As soon as customers start thinking they’re on your brand’s “property,” begin managing time expectations. LEGOLAND did this to some extent with online tickets promising shorter waits and the onsite LEGO brick bowls and water stand. But since the most readily available parking is across the street in a multi-level shopping center parking lot, it would be great to see more directional signage right away to identify the fastest route to LEGOLAND from the garage.

Tip: Start managing time expectations as close as you can to your brand’s Zero Moment of Truth.

2. Get people “inside” right away and create experiential variety

It was overcast and cooler given Kansas City’s summer, so our hour-long outdoor wait could have been much more brutal. In any event, the LEGOLAND Discovery Center is failing to bring people “inside” a more structured brand experience as soon as possible. This could happen by extending the waiting area’s physical environment (necessitating re-design / construction) or by creating more experiences and visual variety in line. LEGOLAND had one interactive TV near the outdoor line’s last leg, but little else to suggest anything visually about the brand. Our wait was brightened by talking with a friendly mom from St. Louis and watching all the interactions Clarkson generated through how cute and fun he is. This helped to pass the time, but had nothing to do with LEGOLAND.

Tip: Use a variety of brand elements (video, interaction, visuals, messaging, suspense, access to amenities) to get waiting people “inside” your brand early to create a positive brand experience.

3. Share “official” information from your brand

Don’t leave it to customers to share with each other what the waiting experience will be. Even worse, don’t allow customers to imagine for themselves what the waiting experience for your brand will represent for them. While LEGOLAND Discovery Center employees were moving around the crowd (with shirts advertising season passes – which get you into a preferred line), none seemed to be offering information on what was in store for our wait that day.

Tip: Provide cues to customers when they are in queue with time management-related information and updates to actively manage expectations.

4. Under promise and over deliver when time-related customer expectations

There’s nothing wrong with fudging and saying the wait will be longer than you know it will be. There IS something wrong with a brand not volunteering any information to customers. Managing customer expectations in a favorable way for your brand gives the brand a cushion and positions it as over-delivering before the heart of the brand experience even begins. Think about the last time you waited in line at a restaurant as long as they said you would. How about never?

Tip: Managing expectations favorably means you have to play a role in anticipating the experience, sharing pertinent details about the experience with customers, and reinforcing your brand’s performance.

5. Coach customers for stronger performance without rubbing their noses in it

Guests who had secured tickets online, purchased annual passes, or were part of pre-arranged groups were able to go to shorter lines. While this preferential treatment reinforced for those of us waiting for an hour that we could have been better customers, even the preferred customers didn’t get into LEGOLAND right away. Instead, they simply waited in shorter lines right next to our longer line. As a result, seeing these groups enjoying a slightly better brand experience wasn’t completely effective in coaching us to be on the LEGOLAND “program.” Instead, it was simply annoying to both us (since we felt like second-class brand guests) and the preferred customers (who didn’t really get the benefits they had been promised).

Tip: Definitely provide a better brand experience to high-performing customers, but make sure you fulfill on the customer expectations you’ve set, while creating attractive incentives for other customers to perform at a stronger level.

What lessons do you suggest for managing customer expectations when it comes to time?

What have you experienced relative to managing customer expectations? What has worked for your brand in this area? – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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3

Saturday’s Wall Street Journal featured a “Creating” profile in the Review section of Katrina Markoff, co-founder of Vosges HautChocolat, a $30 million purveyor of unusually flavored chocolate truffles and other chocolate goodies (including a line of bacon and chocolate products for all the bacon-obsessed, social media fans).

As with many other Creating columns, this one includes five great reminders (and associated questions) about what a strong creative process can look like – no matter what creative medium you are employing:

1. Use a non-traditional creative medium

No need to be stuck using a traditional creative medium when there are opportunities to use another medium to accomplish a familiar creative expression. In the case of Katrina Markoff, she considers truffles as a medium to tell stories.

Question: How can you use a distinctive talent you have to accomplish a very different creative output?

2. Put your life into your creative work

Katrina Markoff looks to her travel and personal experiences as inspiration for the flavor pairings in her chocolate truffles. As the Wall Street Journal describes her inspirations, they sound much like the improv comedy starter: The suggestion of a person, place, or thing.

Question: In what ways are you working on your improvisation skills since they are so intertwined with creative pursuits?

3. Create combinations others have not or will not try

Vosges Haut-Chocolat is known for offering unusual, surprising combinations of ingredients with chocolate, including wasabi, olives, flowers, and a variety of types of chilies. Quite a bit more exotic than chocolate and peanut butter!

Question: How are you continually pushing yourself to develop your abilities to identify incredible mash-ups?

4. Creative output is one part inspiration and several parts cultivation

Once she has her initial creative inspiration, Katrina Markoff turns to research and further brainstorming. The benefit of these extra steps is the opportunity to look for new strategic connections between her inspiration and the possible ingredients she is envisioning.

Question: What is the most recent tool you learned to inspire and cultivate creativity?

5. Start experimenting and tinkering out of the limelight

After prioritizing potential ingredient combinations, Markoff enters her personal kitchen where she reports it typically takes “four to seven” attempts to land on the right flavor. She prefers working by herself so she can continue tinkering uninterrupted, even if that means staying up well into the night to do it.

Question: Do you have (or are you developing) multiple routines to spark your creativity?

Are these five elements part of your creative process?

If one or more of these don’t find their way into your creative efforts, how does yours look different?  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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10

Reviewing search results for the Brainzooming website shows creative thinking skills and creative inspiration are among the most popular blog topics here. Those readership metrics have prompted additional “how to be creative” articles in the last year.

  • It is good since it demonstrates a responsive editorial calendar to address your interest in creativity topics.
  • It is bad in that it can make it more challenging for readers to find “how to be creative” tips and ideas when you most need them (at least that is what some Brainzooming blog readers have said).

To make it easier to track down creativity help when you want it, there are 188 creative thinking and creativity tips, tricks, and ideas for then you need creative inspiration.

Personal Creative Inspiration

Want to Sharpen Your Creative Thinking Skills?

Needing a Creative Confidence Boost?

Looking for a Personal Creativity Recharge?

How to Be Creative with a Team

Need to Build a Great Creative Team?

Trying to Protect New Creative Thinking as It Develops?

Inspiration for How to Be Creative in New Ways

Want to Use Social Media for Creative Inspiration?

Thinking about Tapping Twitter for Ideas on How to Be Creative?

Needing to Successfully Implement Your Creative Vision?

Stumped on How to Borrow Creative Ideas with a Clear Conscience?

Needing Idea Generation for Creative Names for a Product or Service?

Looking for Ways to Achieve Extreme Creativity?

Creative Performance

Having a Creative Block?

Looking to Jump Start Your Creative Performance?

Ideas for Turning off Your Creativity to Finish a Creative Project?

What other topics are you interested in about creative thinking skills and how to be creative?

There are plenty more articles on how to be creative throughout the Brainzooming blog, but if we have not covered a creativity topic you are looking for, let us know. We will get it addressed! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creative boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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1

Becoming an official sponsor of the Olympic Games is expensive.

But what if your brand wanted to APPEAR to be an Olympic Games sponsor without paying the typical sponsorship fee? Is that even possible?

Yes, it is possible, if you are adept at guerrilla marketing (affiliate link) and are willing to try a sponsor bomb strategy. A sponsor bomb, similar to a photobomb, involves getting near enough to a major sponsorship property to be able to bask in the attention it generates – without running afoul of the sponsorship property owner!

How do you sponsor bomb the Summer Olympics?

Here is how we applied guerrilla marketing principles to create a sponsor bomb for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at my former company, a global business-to-business transportation services provider.

The Background for the Strategy

Guerrilla Marketing - Sponsor Bomb the OlympicsOur company wanted to send a message to a focused target audience of employees in our headquarter locations – Kansas City, MO and Cleveland / Akron, OH – and the broader local communities. The message was our company was still viable, had a global perspective, and had the stability to be associated with a major event such as the Summer Olympics.

The guerrilla marketing approach involved a series of 4 identically-structured television commercials starring our own employees from around the world. Each commercial delivered the same message and was featured in heavy rotation during local advertising breaks for the NBC affiliates within the Summer Olympics in our headquarter TV markets. While we skimped on metrics (because of a very tight budget), the overwhelming feedback of people in both markets was a belief that we had to be a major sponsor of the Summer Olympics.

4 Keys to Sponsor Bomb a Major Sponsorship Property with Guerrilla Marketing

From our experience sponsor bombing the Olympics, here are our takeaway guerrilla marketing lessons to developing and implementing a sponsor bomb strategy:

1. Figure Out All the Places Where the Event Will Be Visible to Your Target Audience

If you’re going to sponsor bomb successfully, identify everywhere the sponsor property will be visible – in-person, traditional media, online, etc. Once you have done that, figure out which venue is most likely to overlap with where your target audience will be viewing or participating in the event.

In our case: The opportunity was to buy time in the local TV affiliate breaks since it was affordable and allowed us to target audiences in Kansas City and Cleveland/Akron.

2. Mass Inferior Resources to Maximize the Impact

When you are using a guerrilla marketing strategy in place of a traditional sponsorship it probably means you have inferior resources relative to traditional sponsors. The difference is though, you may have proportionately more dollars to put into marketing the sponsor bomb effort. You need to orient the marketing mix for your sponsor bomb strategy to have the biggest possible impact when you can be active, even if it means passing up having a presence elsewhere / at other times.

In our case: We put our advertising investment into only the two (eventually 3) local markets with 15-second TV commercials. These shorter commercials were less costly, allowing us to buy approximately 100 or more airings  in each market coming into and leaving local break in the Olympics. The result was if you were in either local market, we seemed to “own” the Olympics broadcast because of the high frequency we achieved.

3. Keep Your Hands Really Clean

With a sponsor bomb strategy, you don’t want to run afoul of the sponsorship property owner or other sponsors. That means it is vital to understand what you can and cannot do, say, and represent relative to the property.

In our case: We could not show the Olympic rings, but the legal team said we could say “Summer Olympics” without naming the host city of the Olympics.

4. The creative execution should be more strategic than creative (and it must be incredibly creative)

Creative execution for a sponsor bomb has to integrate strongly with the rest of the sponsor bomb strategy to maximize the impact with the target audience. The creative has to match up with the objectives, the budget, and how you are deploying resources. To make the sponsor bomb work, creative that generates a big “wow” without supporting every aspect of the strategy is just a wasted opportunity.

In our case: To stay in budget, we had to go with lower production values. The idea of featuring employees played into lower production costs, plus it put the target audience right into the Olympics advertisement. The repetitive structure allowed us to feature more employees (4 different versions of the ad) while not compromising the advantages we were getting from the high frequency we were able to achieve with 15-second advertisements (featured below).

Have you tried or seen a similar guerrilla marketing sponsorship strategy?

There are multiple ways you can employ this type of non-traditional sponsorship strategy. As we’ve discussed previously, The Brainzooming Group used a variation of this approach to create the Building the Gigabit City sponsorship. While it may be more challenging strategically than a typical sponsorship approach, the rewards for your effort can be tremendous! – Mike Brown

 

     (Affiliate Link) 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

 

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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5

What impact does social media audience building create and is it really worth it to increase the number of Twitter followers you have?

Twitter Followers - Social Media Audience GrowthOver the weekend, a Brainzooming blog reader tweeted congratulating me on how many Twitter followers we enjoy for the @Brainzooming Twitter profile and hoping “they generate lots of work/business.”

There is certainly a common expectation of spending time on social media being able to DIRECTLY generate business. The view is fueled by SO many tweets, blog posts, webinars, etc. promising to tell you how to make this phenomenon happen. It is not, however, the reason I started investing time building a social media audience.

In fact, I created a Twitter profile well before The Brainzooming Group started. Social media paved the way to to build a social media audience and get the business going even though revenue generation wasn’t an initial element of our social media strategy. Instead, the number of Twitter followers and other people in our social media audience provided a platform and additional external credibility to launch The Brainzooming Group.

All of this is to support why we talk about whole-brain social media metrics, recognizing there will be both quantitative and qualitative benefits from a social media investment, and each type of social media metric can be important from both a business and/or a personal perspective.

11 Benefits from a Growing Social Media Audience

With that backdrop, here are eleven of the wonderful things the very kind Twitter followers who are part of the @Brainzooming family contribute to our business.

Twitter followers:

1. Help build the @Brainzooming target audience – Through recommendations to friends, sharing Brainzooming content, and #FollowFriday tweets (among other ways), @twilli2861, @marketingveep, @justcoachit, and others have increased @Brainzooming Twitter followers to reach part of our target audience we might never have reached as quickly.

2. Create credibility – Holding and growing a base of Twitter followers over multiple years is an indicator of the value of the social media content and interaction we have with each other. This credibility from our social media audience has helped open doors for social media strategy work and was integral to being named to the Innovation Excellence list of the Top 50 Innovation Tweeters.

3. Provide opportunities for additional exposure within the target audience – Twitter followers have provided a variety of new opportunities to increase exposure for Brainzooming among their target audience members. @ToddSchnick has provided multiple ones just by himself, including radio interviews and appearing in his new Kicking Fear’s Ass eBook.

4. Allow Brainzooming to be “seen” with them – Through tweeting with @Just_Stacy recently, a friend of hers was introduced to the Brainzooming Twitter profile and contacted us about developing and delivering innovation training for her company.

5. Introduce the brand to new people – It was an online introduction and follow-up that led to meeting @BobFine and the opportunity to write for his award-winning magazine The Social Media Monthly at its launch.

6. Help define and position the Brainzooming brand for our target audience – One of the metrics I find most rewarding is the number of Twitter lists on which our account is listed in relation to the number of followers. Additionally, through the names of these lists, we get an understanding of how people group and view the brand. (If you have not reviewed the list names of which you are a member, you need to look. It is tremendously instructive.)

7. Share motivation and encouragement – There are a few friends (including @amyrnbsn) who will reach out if my tweets seem “down” to cheer me up. You cannot put a price on that!

8. Point me to intriguing content – I look toward the people on Twitter to point me to great content online. They send me places I would never find for myself.

9. Offer counsel – These conversations usually happen via direct messages and have helped me think through both personal and business issues more effectively. @EAlvarezGibson has been the dispenser of much of this beneficial counsel.

10. Offer creative inspiration – So many people to point to here, but a great example is @DoseofCre8ivity and her 30 Days of Creativity project in the summer of 2012 that was a daily inspiration to for so many people.

11. Help us understand what social media content resonates with people – Retweets and responses to Brainzooming content are tremendously helpful in shaping our social media strategy. Retweets while I was sleeping were an early indicator of active engagement from the Brainzooming Twitter profile global audience, prompting a move to a 24-hour sharing schedule.

What impact do followers have for you or your business?

As I finish this list, I realize I forgot to include all the Twiter friends who have written guest posts, of which @WBendle has clearly been the most prolific, and meeting new people in my hometown, i.e. @JordanEM.

So in response to this weekend’s tweet, this is a PARTIAL list of benefits I get from the great Twitter followers @Brainzooming has for its Twitter profile!  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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5

Want to take on an intriguing personal challenge for the week?

Level 5 Decision MakingNot only make fewer decisions, but also INFLUENCE fewer decisions.

What I am talking about is trying to embrace more Level 5 decisions this week.

Level 5 Decisions

In his book, “The End of Marketing as We Know It,” (affiliate link) Sergio Zyman, former Chief Marketing Officer at Coca-Cola, discussed the five levels of the decision making process he used relative to his team.

My boss, Greg Reid, read the book by Sergio Zyman and employed four of the five levels of decision making with our team:

  • Level 1 – His decision with no input from the team
  • Level 2 – His decision with input from the team
  • Level 3 – Consensus decision (This is the one Greg ruled out; we did not have consensus decisions.)
  • Level 4 – A team member’s decision with his input
  • Level 5 – A team member’s decision with no input or influence from him

Some co-workers found the five level decision making process difficult, but it proved very freeing since you knew ahead of time what type of input or approval you needed to keep an initiative going.

While there were very few Level 1 or Level 5 situations with Greg, I have tried over time to embrace more Level 5 decisions. The key has been not necessarily caring about things less, but caring intensely about fewer things. Now I try to focus on only being an influence on decisions involving what matters strategically.

If nothing else, experience has demonstrated on many occasions that even when a small thing does not go as I wanted, everything still works out and frequently works out in some other unexpected positive way.

Ready to Allow More Decision Making without Your Influence this Week!

I invite you to join me this week to see if there are decisions you used to make or try to shape that can be left to other people. Rather than being nerve racking, as I’d expected, embracing more Level 5 decisions has mainly provided a lot of peace, relief, and importantly, growth for those I work with as they get to exercise their own strategic decision making skills.

So, what do you think about this decision making process? Are you ready for more Level 5 decision making without your influence this week?  – Mike Brown

     (Affiliate Link)

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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4

Seeing painful examples this week featuring social media completely devoid of real brand personality means it’s time to create a simple social media personality audit.

Social media content with no brand personality?

Social-Media-Personality-AuditExample 1: The Financial Institution

There’s a TV advertisement running in Kansas City for a financial institution’s new blog targeted at women. The TV advertisement features five women in a kitchen, supposedly talking and sharing in a very “it’s just us girls” way. Apparently by “just us girls” though the financial institution means “in a very stilted, formal, artificial, and awkward” way.

When you check out the financial institution blog, the “stilted, formal, etc.” sentiment carries throughout its site. The five women in the ad obviously represent five personas for the blog. But instead of depicting real people, the five women are characters with phony descriptive names tied to each persona’s life stage and some variation of the financial institution’s signature color.

Let’s just say the dearth of activity on the financial institution blog suggests nobody feels like hanging out in the virtual kitchen to talk and share with these phony personalities.

Example 2: The Vet Clinic

Then yesterday, after visiting our vet to pick up the cats, the vet clinic popped up on Facebook with a status update about a new blog post. I clicked the link and scanned the last three vet clinic blog posts. All three blog posts were about products to keep away from your pet. Helpful information, without a doubt. But the information appeared (based on the blog design information) to be generated by a company specializing in on-hold call systems. As a result, the vet clinic blog posts had the personality one would typically associate with an on-hold call.

This is in stark contrast, however, to a very friendly and warm vet clinic where vets, techs, and other staff have shown us tremendous support as one cat faded and get genuinely excited and have a special nickname for our other cat when she visits the cat clinic.

10 Question Social Media Content Personality Audit

These two social media examples so devoid of brand personality sent me looking for definitions of individual personality and brand personality to spur my creative thinking.

Based on the words suggested in the Wikipedia entries and our experience with good and bad social media content, here are 10 questions the financial institution, the vet clinic, or your brand can ask to see whether you are putting enough personality into social media.

Apply this 10 question social media personality audit to see how any social media content from a brand does. Give two points for every “Yes” answer and no points for every “No” answer:

  • Is there an overriding emotion this social media content suggests?
  • Would you know the attitude employees of this brand embody from its social media content?
  • Are the behaviors your people display when they go above and beyond to help customers clearly suggested?
  • When you see this content, does it appear as if it could be shared in a genuine conversation or letter exchange with someone who knows you?
  • Is there a level of familiarity suggested that customers or potential customers would expect when they dealt with your employees in person?
  • Does this social media content have a spark of imagination and spirit?
  • Will the information shared via social media pass the “straight face” test?
  • Does the tone and delivery of the social media content treat the reader with clear respect?
  • Will a reader walk away from this social media content enriched both intellectually and emotionally?
  • Would people legitimately want to spend more time with the person delivering this social media content?

Let’s see how you did!

Grading the Social Media Content Personality Audit

Here’s how to score a brand on the social media personality audit:

  • 18 or Greater: “A” – You are delivering personality throughout your social media content
  • 16:  “B” – You’re showing more personality than most are in social media
  • 12 – 14: “C” – Social media content you produce might reflect aspects of your brand personality, but it could easily be missed
  • Less than 12: “Fail” – Your social media content probably has drab stock photos (even for what should be employee images), copy that should be on your website and not your blog, and status updates that read like short-form press releases

Who is doing it right?

If you want to see a local brand that has really impressed me of late by oozing its brand personality in social media content, check out the Kansas City store, STUFF on Facebook. It’s located on my favorite creative block in Kansas City, and in the face of a lot of generic retail social media content, STUFF shows you can showcase your brand personality in an imaginative way every day.

Oh, BTW, there is a caveat

Most of the creative questions, strategic thinking exercises, and innovation-inducing tools shared on the Brainzooming blog spring from real-life organizational situations and have been tried and tested.

This social media audit hasn’t, at least in this form. It’s all stuff I fully believe and espouse, but this attempt to share it in a new way isn’t client tested. Because of that, I’d love to see you apply it, and let us know if you think it’s appropriately categorizing the good and bad of social media content you see. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming email updates.

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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