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Seeing painful examples this week featuring social media completely devoid of real brand personality means it’s time to create a simple social media personality audit.

Social media content with no brand personality?

Social-Media-Personality-AuditExample 1: The Financial Institution

There’s a TV advertisement running in Kansas City for a financial institution’s new blog targeted at women. The TV advertisement features five women in a kitchen, supposedly talking and sharing in a very “it’s just us girls” way. Apparently by “just us girls” though the financial institution means “in a very stilted, formal, artificial, and awkward” way.

When you check out the financial institution blog, the “stilted, formal, etc.” sentiment carries throughout its site. The five women in the ad obviously represent five personas for the blog. But instead of depicting real people, the five women are characters with phony descriptive names tied to each persona’s life stage and some variation of the financial institution’s signature color.

Let’s just say the dearth of activity on the financial institution blog suggests nobody feels like hanging out in the virtual kitchen to talk and share with these phony personalities.

Example 2: The Vet Clinic

Then yesterday, after visiting our vet to pick up the cats, the vet clinic popped up on Facebook with a status update about a new blog post. I clicked the link and scanned the last three vet clinic blog posts. All three blog posts were about products to keep away from your pet. Helpful information, without a doubt. But the information appeared (based on the blog design information) to be generated by a company specializing in on-hold call systems. As a result, the vet clinic blog posts had the personality one would typically associate with an on-hold call.

This is in stark contrast, however, to a very friendly and warm vet clinic where vets, techs, and other staff have shown us tremendous support as one cat faded and get genuinely excited and have a special nickname for our other cat when she visits the cat clinic.

10 Question Social Media Content Personality Audit

These two social media examples so devoid of brand personality sent me looking for definitions of individual personality and brand personality to spur my creative thinking.

Based on the words suggested in the Wikipedia entries and our experience with good and bad social media content, here are 10 questions the financial institution, the vet clinic, or your brand can ask to see whether you are putting enough personality into social media.

Apply this 10 question social media personality audit to see how any social media content from a brand does. Give two points for every “Yes” answer and no points for every “No” answer:

  • Is there an overriding emotion this social media content suggests?
  • Would you know the attitude employees of this brand embody from its social media content?
  • Are the behaviors your people display when they go above and beyond to help customers clearly suggested?
  • When you see this content, does it appear as if it could be shared in a genuine conversation or letter exchange with someone who knows you?
  • Is there a level of familiarity suggested that customers or potential customers would expect when they dealt with your employees in person?
  • Does this social media content have a spark of imagination and spirit?
  • Will the information shared via social media pass the “straight face” test?
  • Does the tone and delivery of the social media content treat the reader with clear respect?
  • Will a reader walk away from this social media content enriched both intellectually and emotionally?
  • Would people legitimately want to spend more time with the person delivering this social media content?

Let’s see how you did!

Grading the Social Media Content Personality Audit

Here’s how to score a brand on the social media personality audit:

  • 18 or Greater: “A” – You are delivering personality throughout your social media content
  • 16:  “B” – You’re showing more personality than most are in social media
  • 12 – 14: “C” – Social media content you produce might reflect aspects of your brand personality, but it could easily be missed
  • Less than 12: “Fail” – Your social media content probably has drab stock photos (even for what should be employee images), copy that should be on your website and not your blog, and status updates that read like short-form press releases

Who is doing it right?

If you want to see a local brand that has really impressed me of late by oozing its brand personality in social media content, check out the Kansas City store, STUFF on Facebook. It’s located on my favorite creative block in Kansas City, and in the face of a lot of generic retail social media content, STUFF shows you can showcase your brand personality in an imaginative way every day.

Oh, BTW, there is a caveat

Most of the creative questions, strategic thinking exercises, and innovation-inducing tools shared on the Brainzooming blog spring from real-life organizational situations and have been tried and tested.

This social media audit hasn’t, at least in this form. It’s all stuff I fully believe and espouse, but this attempt to share it in a new way isn’t client tested. Because of that, I’d love to see you apply it, and let us know if you think it’s appropriately categorizing the good and bad of social media content you see. – Mike Brown

 

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If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating a 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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“When Everything Is in the Cloud, What Does ‘Place’ Mean?”

That was a quote from the inaugural Gigabit City Summit courtesy of Josep Piqué, Director Strategic Sectors – 22@Barcelona during the wrap-up section of the inaugural Gigabit City Summit. Amid so much great discussion and information sharing during the global conversation, this comment from Josep Piqué stood out to me as a very rich, life-changing strategic question in the years immediately ahead.

As more of the “things” we work and play with are digitized, they have the potential to become omnipresent. When you start to digitize organizations and the structural elements that give organizations their presence and power? Well then, if not all, than a whole bunch of bets are off.

This was exactly the point that Simon Kuo raised when the early Building the Gigabit City results were shared. Simon talked about how education and businesses will be turned over as physical structure is completely re-envisioned.

These points got me thinking about some of the areas affected if “places” becomes irrelevant. I will admit, this list is not based on extensive research or philosophical exploration. I simply started a list of ideas about what place might mean and some of the related areas that could start to change.

What Does Place Mean?

Place is where someone or something is from . . .

  • It shapes a person or object’s history and background
  • It’s somewhere you stay or leave and may return to in the future

Place is where people meet and congregate . . .

  • Governing happens
  • Learning happens there
  • Information and opinions are shared
  • Spiritual beliefs are celebrated
  • Friends are made

Place is where functions are carried out . . .

  • People work
  • Marriages happen and families are created
  • Money is saved, spent, and invested
  • Teaching and learning happen

Place is where people are entertained . . .

  • Movies are shown
  • Concerts are performed
  • Sports are contested

Place is where goods and services are consumed . . .

  • Goods are sold and bought
  • Medical treatment is provided

Places are where people reside . . .

  • Property is sold, bought, and owned
  • They are defended
  • People live, raise families, and are buried
  • Taxes are paid

How would you change this list?

There are clearly duplications and omissions among this list inspired by Josep Piqué and Simon Kuo. Would you help build and improve it by sharing your ideas on what “place” means and how it shapes our lives today . . . and will in the future? – Mike Brown

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How can ultra high-speed internet speeds drive innovation? “Building the Gigabit City: Brainzooming a Google Fiber Roadmap,” a free 120-page report, shares 60 business opportunities for driving innovation and hundreds of ideas for education, healthcare, jobs, community activities, and more.  Download this exclusive Google Fiber report sponsored by Social Media Club of Kansas City and The Brainzooming Group addressing how ultra high-speed internet can spur economic development, growth, and improved lifestyles globally. 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The Brainzooming Group joined with the Social Media Club of Kansas City in summer 2011 to plan Building the Gigabit City. The initial Building the Gigabit City effort was a large-scale brainstorming session to imagine what Kansas City could be like with ultra-high-speed Internet courtesy of the introduction of Google Fiber on both the Kansas and Missouri sides of the state line.

The initial Google Fiber brainstorming session continues to lead to a variety of other outputs, including the free 120-page “Building the Gigabit City” report recapping the concepts and ideas generated at the session. The session also produced a recap video with a variety of brainstorming session participants sharing their hopes for a new Kansas City.

What’s Next? The Gigabit City Summit: A Global Dialog on Smart and Connected Cities

Most recently The Brainzooming Group has partnered with Curiolab and Sandel & Associates to create and produce the Gigabit City Summit, A Global Dialog on Smart and Connected Cities. This series of global discussions held through Cisco Telepresence, is allowing experts worldwide to meet, share their expertise, and convey best practices from the implementation of next-generation city efforts. Participants throughout the Gigabit City Summit sessions will include:

  • City leaders at the forefront of next-generation communities
  • Industry and community experts who manage smart/intelligent community initiatives
  • Vertical experts in industries highly subject to disruption by a faster, more seamless Internet, including media, healthcare, education, government, entrepreneurship, and venture capital

We held the first Gigabit City Summit session on June 27 to set the stage for the entire series of events. Presenters included Mayor Joe Reardon from Kansas City, KS (Wyandotte County), Mayor Sly James of Kansas City, MO, and author Tim Campbell who provided an overview from his book Beyond Smart Cities – How Cities Network, Learn and Innovate (affiliate link). You can listen to the entire inaugural Gigabit City Summit session online to get a sense of the topics we’ll be covering monthly.

 

 

Participate in the Gigabit City Summit

As a Brainzooming reader, I want to personally invite you to listen and participate live via WebEx, courtesy of the Smart + Connected Communities Institute, to the next session on Leadership, Organization and Community Challenges. The session will take place live on Wednesday, July 25th, 7:00-9:00 am CDT and will be available for replay afterward.

The second Gigabit City Summit will features representatives from innovation hubs around the world, including Amsterdam, Barcelona, Hyderabad, Singapore and Toronto. In addition the co-chairs of the Mayors’ Bistate Innovations Team, Mike Burke and Ray Daniels, along with David Warm, Executive Director of Kansas City’s regional planning organization will talk about preparation for the arrival of Google Fiber, which is scheduled to make a major announcement about the Kansas City Google Fiber product launch on July 26th.

Sponsor the Gigabit City Summit

Beyond listening to the sessions, there are sponsorship opportunities for organizations who would like to engage in these global, next-generation cities conversations.

Gigabit City Summit sponsors can take advantage of exclusive networking, content marketing, and thought leadership opportunities, in addition to a variety of other sponsorship assets. The sponsorship document below highlights the Gigabit City Summit and the related sponsorship opportunities for the series of events.

Contact me at info@brainzooming.com  if you’d like to discuss how your organization can become directly involved as a Gigabit City Summit sponsor.

 

Let’s keep the conversation going! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

How can ultra high-speed internet speeds drive innovation? “Building the Gigabit City: Brainzooming a Google Fiber Roadmap,” a free 120-page report, shares 60 business opportunities for driving innovation and hundreds of ideas for education, healthcare, jobs, community activities, and more.  Download this exclusive Google Fiber report sponsored by Social Media Club of Kansas City and The Brainzooming Group addressing how ultra high-speed internet can spur economic development, growth, and improved lifestyles globally. 

 

      (Affiliate link)

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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For many B2B marketers, a brand building marketing strategy can mean pulling budget from product-focused marketing initiatives that directly drive response or purchase with the target audience. All too often branding is treated as a mutually exclusive marketing strategy set distinctly apart from the response-based strategies used in product- or solution-focused marketing efforts.

 

In fact, responsibility for brand strategy and product marketing often resides in different departments. For those organizations, the answer to bridging this gap is typically instituting formalized brand usage guidelines. And while it’s one element of successful branding, a unified look driven by corporate identity standards is sometimes mistaken for implementing an integrated brand strategy.

It is easy to understand why branding and direct response strategies have historically been isolated.  The messaging, media and metrics used to guide each are polar opposites by definition.

The Great Abyss

Strong, relevant brands have identified the emotional drivers associated with their value and have successfully integrated those emotional pulls into the messaging, tone, and imagery aimed at the target audience. On the other end of the spectrum, successful direct response relies on the pragmatic purchase decision levers with offer strategies that drive a particular action such as a limited time value-added benefit or price break.

Beyond the corporate identity, brand strategies are often synonymous with large branding campaigns communicated most frequently through trade publications in B2B markets, but also through television and radio. Comparatively, direct response has predominantly been implemented through one-to-one media such direct mail and, more recently, interactive media.

Finally, branding success is measured over time against softer brand awareness and recognition metrics, while direct response is measured immediately through definitive response rates and sometimes actual transaction levels.

Given the difference in approach, media and metrics, it is easy to understand why most B2B marketers do not have the budget or resource to fully support both brand and product advertising strategies. As a result, neither typically gets accomplished very well as part of addressing the target audience in a marketing strategy. 

Closing the Gap

But what if you could fuse the benefits of direct response and brand advertising? If successful, you would ensure the core values of your brand were consistently communicated to the target audience and at the same time drive directly measurable results. Using a hybrid approach that integrates the right mix of brand message and response options/offers, along with a performance-based media strategy, can maximize a marketing budget and drive branding and product marketing results.

By definition, good marketing builds the brand and sales by effectively identifying and measurably motivating a decision maker or influencer to take a desired action while continually reinforcing a desired belief. The road map to integrating the benefits of these two marketing strategies can be illustrated through two key B2B marketing tools. The common denominators in B2B media strategy tend to be direct marketing and trade pub advertising; nearly all B2B marketers use both media more heavily than TV, radio or even interactive. Using a direct branding philosophy, the approach to developing and executing each medium would look a little different.

A Marketing Strategy with with Message and Metrics

It’s a messaging challenge. The direct strategies used to motivate a decision maker or influencer to take action now can be counter-productive to the overall brand if not executed properly. The brand message tends to get lost or more likely traded off for messaging that supports only the product features and benefits as well as the call to action. Take the time to weave in your brand.

The insights that drive successful direct marketing are usually very data driven, such as business or demographic descriptors, to drive list source evaluation and acquisition. The insights allow you to target the right audience for the highest anticipated response. That shouldn’t change. However, integrating in the insights that drive strong brand definition shouldn’t be overlooked.  Branding insights are dialog driven to ensure relevant messaging. There is a heavy focus on understanding the motivators as defined by the customer needs and expectations which is often overlooked in developing direct campaigns or mailers.

If it hasn’t already been done within your organization, identify the two or three key brand message points that need to come across at every point of communication with your target audience and infuse those message points through copy, imagery and/or tone of the piece.

Now you’ve successfully integrated your brand, not just your logo, into your direct response strategies. And with every direct interaction, you build brand relevance and equity.

Infusing Direct Marketing Strategy into Branding Initiatives

Isn’t every message, regardless of the medium used to deliver it “one-to-one”?  Ultimately, the goal is to connect with the reader if we’re communicating through trade publication advertising. But what does “connecting” mean? In traditional branding terms, it means we’ve instilled the desired belief about our brand.

That isn’t enough for B2B marketers working on shoestring budgets which is why pure branding campaigns are rarely leveraged.  If the ad could instill that brand belief and entice them to take some type of action – link to a Web site to learn more about the company or product, request more information or even purchase – then you’d have a strong direct branding ad.

Integrating solid direct response strategy into mass media is accomplished in two ways:

  • Including a call to action that drives the reader to a centralized point of contact like a Web site, landing page or an 800 number. The ultimate value lies in response/leads you can measure and the opportunity for one-to-one contact over time.  In addition, it enables a real measure of interaction with your brand.
  • Weighting the media strategy toward performance-based media buys instead of simply relying only on the traditional reach and frequency plan.  This is a balancing act, but increasing media spend with publications that actually generate stronger response to your offer is like increasing spend with a particular list source that’s generating the highest response to your direct campaign.  You wouldn’t keep mailing to a list that doesn’t respond. Balancing the brand exposure benefits of traditional reach and frequency media strategy with productivity based on interest/response generated is a critical element of a solid direct branding strategy.

Now you’ve successfully integrated the value of driving leads and direct measurement of relevant interaction with your brand into your branding initiatives. – Barb Murphy

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

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I’ve had multiple social media-oriented conversations with potential clients recently about how social media in general, and Facebook specifically, supports business-to-business (B2B) relationship marketing. In the midst of these conversations, a real-life B2B relationship marketing case study played out recently courtesy of a Facebook friend who is in B2B sales. Her business-to-business Facebook example demonstrated the strategic perspective we advocate with clients: you can create dynamic experiential marketing opportunities by integrating guerrilla marketing, event marketing, and social media in a B2B setting.

One note: I asked my friend who was behind this experiential marketing case study about using photos and actual Facebook screen shots to better illustrate the content marketing side of her strategy. Because of privacy concerns, however, I can’t. As a result, this overview is generalized – to protect those who had the fun.

Photo by: fkey | Source: Photocase.com

The Experience Creator

My friend  is a senior business development leader for a marketing services company. She’s an incredible networker who will tell you everybody she does business with is a friend. Looking through her nearly thousand Facebook friends, you see a mix of marketers on both the client and provider side. Ultimately, she’s looking to her network and relationship marketing to grow her company’s revenues through helping more clients in more ways. That’s a pretty classic business-to-business objective.

Strengthening B2B Relationships Through Experiential Marketing

My friend created a couples-oriented, weekend experience for several decision makers and influencers at a current client. The weekend involved a few meals – one at a steakhouse Esquire magazine recognized as a top US restaurant and another at a restaurant with a striking view of a natural landmark.

The big event for the weekend was attending one of the “dinosaurs of rock” concerts rumbling across the countryside this summer. Not coincidentally, my friend’s husband knows a musician in one of the well-known bands. This afforded her client group seats close to the stage plus the opportunity to go backstage and meet and greet with performers from several bands.

Nobody can deny that this had to be a memorable experience for the three business-to-business clients who participated since the experience took full advantage of the formula The Brainzooming Group recommends for designing memorable experiences:

  • High Personal Interest: The invitees were of an age where these bands would have been all over the radio during those formative teenage years
  • Strong Emotional Intensity: Being able to experience the concert up-close, go backstage, and meet the stars (made possible by using an important guerrilla marketing tactic: using all the relationships you have to improve your marketing assets)
  • A Clear Enabling Brand: My friend who created the experience was there the whole time

Combining personal interest, emotional intensity, with clarity about how a brand fits into that and made the experience happen is a proven formula for creating a memorable business-to-business experience.

Using Social Media and Content Marketing to Enhance Experiential Marketing

If my friend had done nothing more than creating this memorable event experience, she’d have further solidified relationships and likely identified new business opportunities with three key clients. And that’s a lot. But she also turned the experience into a content marketing bonanza (again, just as we advocate). At each venue, she checked in on Facebook, plus had photos taken of:

  • Her and her clients
  • Her and her clients and their spouses
  • The performers onstage from their upfront seats
  • The entire group with the performers backstage

Importantly, she made the effort to tag herself, her clients, and even the performers they met in more than thirty photos she shared (with “public” status) on Facebook. Of course, her clients were able to like and re-share these photos with their Facebook friends too.

By turning the experiential marketing event into a content marketing opportunity, the weekend experience supported her relationship marketing objectives five ways,

  • A longer-lasting memory for her clients through documented moments on their Facebook timelines
  • A Facebook Edgerank strengthening situation as her clients engaged with her content multiple times, in multiple ways (Liking, Commenting, Sharing)
  • An opportunity for her clients to look like rock stars to their Facebook friends (many of whom are likely “professional” Facebook friends who also buy the types of marketing services my friend sells)
  • A signal to my friend’s other current and prospective Facebook friend clients that great clients get an opportunity to have memorable experiences
  • A shot over the bow to my friend’s competitors that they had better spend some time figuring out how to step up their own client relationships

In talking with my friend a week afterward, she told me she importantly secured an okay from each client invitee to share content on Facebook – a smart content marketing move since people can have very different privacy and comfort levels with social media sharing.

Combining Experiential Marketing and Content Marketing as Part of B2b Relationship Marketing

If you’re still on the fence about how social media supports the business-to-business sales / business development process, this example should ideally start to push you off the fence. It’s not an example that will work for every business-to-business situation, but it does demonstrate how you can use fundamental event marketing and social media principles to design customer experiences which grow, solidify, and drive results from business-to-business relationships. – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your customer service in a smart way without seeming as if you’re micro-managing the customer experience.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Other than a nasty case of New York-quality booing for Robinson Cano not selecting Billy Butler for the Home Run Derby, Kansas City (where The Brainzooming Group is based) seems to be receiving largely strong marks as host of the 83rd Major League Baseball All-Star Game. Talking with the Social Media Club of Kansas City crew running the Social Media Command Center Monday night, they had hardly seen any negative social media sentiment for Kansas City among the #KC (and #ASG) tweets they’d been monitoring and responding to for days.

I saw one visitor on the local news remark about how Kansas City, in contrast to larger cities hosting the All-Star Game, really provided a sense that the All-Star Game is the only show in town. That reaction is similar to ones often heard whenever Kansas City is fortunate enough to host a major event.

The strong positive sentiment for Kansas City may be surprising to the rest of the world, because Kansas City is easy to overlook.

Yet, when circumstances bring people to Kansas City as residents, they tend to stay here longer than they ever would have imagined.  I think this dramatically different attitude from visitors once they are actually here is because Kansas City is an underdog type of town.

I’ve always been one to love an underdog, whether it is a city, sports team, brand, or even an employee I’ve hired. I love the person who is going to come in and surprise everyone by doing incredible things no one would have ever expected.

9 Reasons to Love an Underdog

Why do I love an underdog so much? Well, here are nine reasons to love an underdog since it:

1. Is motivated by knowing failure can bring disproportionate negative consequences.

2. Survives by exploiting the smaller opportunities it typically receives for all they are worth.

3. Lives and breathes trying to figure out how to rise above the expectations everyone has.

4. Is familiar with making low resource-high impact strategies work.

5. Displays the genuine humility that comes from knowing what it’s like to have your head handed to you by a strong competitor.

6. Is better at taking advice and counsel because it’s needed to continually learn and improve.

7. Has to try harder than other competitors do to succeed.

8. Isn’t beyond bending the rules or playing a little rough to win.

9. Is going to be fiercely loyal to whoever believes in them.

What are your reasons to love an underdog?

Am I alone on this, or do you have a soft spot for underdogs as well? Are there other reasons to love an underdog you would add? Are there certain types of underdogs you like, or do you like all underdogs? I’d love to hear about your favorites! – Mike Brown

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

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Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Some people ooze creative confidence. They display a sense of self-assured creativity that can fill you with equal parts admiration, envy, discouragement, and disbelief (that anyone can have their act that together relative to how to be more creative).

For those of us without that elevated level of creative confidence, how to be more creative and boost our personal creative confidence can be a big question.

3 Ways to Your Boost Creative Confidence

Here are three ideas to boost creativity and shape how to be more creative in your daily activities:

1. Train on your creative wins to boost creativity.

Always have memory triggers you can use to recall creative wins you’ve enjoyed as a way to boost creativity. These can be photos, videos, audio files, mementos, portfolios, correspondence – anything to help recall ways you’ve used in the past that will help you now in how to be more creative.

So how do you “train” using these memory trigger to boost creativity? Considering these creative wins, ask yourself these questions:

  • What was the creative impact I helped deliver in this situation?
  • How did I prepare creatively for this creative win?
  • What creative process did I use?
  • How did I overcome any creative challenges I encountered?

Answering these questions can help build your creative confidence through recalling specific creative strategies you want to make sure you use again to be more creative now.

2. Go with what you know and add something else you don’t to be more creative.

Instead of simply relying on your creative talents that feel most comfortable and were tested creatively years ago, how about picking a comfortable creative talent combined with a creative pursuit you’ve rarely pursued? I’m trying to apply this advice right now for how to be more creative with the Brainzooming blog. I’ve written more than a thousand blog posts on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Now I’m now searching for a different creative approach to pair with writing to boost creative energy and develop a new blog experience. (BTW – if you want to share some creative ideas on this, I’m very interested in hearing them!)

3. Go with what you don’t know and stretch your creative confidence.

To dramatically boost your creative confidence, dive into something completely new creatively, conquer it, and build on your successes (and challenges) from the effort.

This creative approach isn’t a strong suit of mine since I enjoy going to school on new activities before diving in creatively. I do try though to put myself into situations where I’m forced to try new creative strategies.

One example recently was attending an improv comedy breakout at the Big Ideas conference. Everyone had to stand up and participate in the improv comedy exercises. While I like making up funny jokes and remarks in reaction to things that happen in life, this was the first time I’d ever done improv comedy exercises designed to boost your comedy skills. The comedy exercises were fun, and I feel a lot more confident in my ability to do something like this again without preparation.

When you’re working on how to be more creative, what do you do?

Have you successfully tried one of these creative strategies or a variation on one of them? Are there other creative strategies that are working for you to boost your creative confidence? Let us know your ideas. – Mike Brown

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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