Strategic Thinking | The Brainzooming Group - Part 179 – page 179
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Since things are usually pretty hectic on January 2, with a lot of catch up to do, today’s post is brief, focusing on a key point for consideration.
Great strategic thinking flows more readily if you’re able to use multiple perspectives that help you gain new insights into your situation. You can also improve the time efficiency of strategic thinking by using productive exercises & tools. We’ll cover both of these areas throughout the year.
Ultimately, though, you will have to set aside some time to actually do the work of strategic thinking. You can make the time as productive as possible if you know under what circumstances you do your best thinking:

  • Do you need quiet time away or are you more insightful when you’re active and in the thick of things?
  • Inside or outside?
  • By yourself or with others? With which other people?
  • Well in advance or under time pressures?
  • Being quiet or talking it through aloud?
  • Scheduled or impromptu?

Figured out yet what type of strategic thinking time works best for you? Once you do, make time throughout 2008 where you can create the ideal situation for productive strategic thinking. We’ll bring the tools & exercises to help create the perspectives you’ll need. It’s a date!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’m breaking my promise on no holiday posts only because there’s a great holiday-related strategic truth to share: strategy shouldn’t be unnecessarily complicated or obscure. Great strategy is understandable and clearly communicates what makes sense to do and to not do.

On Christmas Eve afternoon, we went to visit my mom’s aunt who had baked an apricot kuchen (a German coffee cake) that’s unbelievably wonderful and one of my favorite desserts. Not only does she make kuchen, she also is known for her bierocks and cinnamon rolls.

She told us that a number of people had asked her to start baking some nut breads, but she wasn’t interested in doing it. The reason? The kuchen, bierocks, and cinnamon rolls were all made from the same dough. By sticking to a single dough, she can be very efficient and have an extremely high certainty that everything she bakes will be good. What brilliant strategic focus!

So while my Aunt Ollie probably wouldn’t think of herself as strategic, she demonstrates an important lesson – your strategy should align your primary activities and carrying it out should help you to be more efficient and effective than if you weren’t following the strategy. And if the focused strategist is an incredible baker…so much the better! Have a Happy New Year!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The initial posts on this blog were on closing the strategic thinking gap that develops in many businesses (i.e., a desire to invest significant time on strategic issues, but little time spent in reality). Here are links to the five posts in order:

Why strategic thinking doesn’t happen
Something’s missing in strategic thinking
Somebody’s missing from the strategic thinking effort
Tools to improve strategic thinking’s efficiency & effectiveness
Outcomes are missing from strategic thinking & wrap-up

The posts provide an overview of specific approaches that can be taken to improve the quality & output of strategic thinking efforts in business.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I was struggling recently to pull together slides for a branding presentation – an effort requiring only a little strategic thought and creativity. But several attempts at starting were relatively fruitless. Even though I’d set aside focused time to do the project, it was impossible to progress.

At the same time, another project was pending; it had to be completed so that the next person in the process could begin. With that project lingering, I forced myself into the mode of answering questions, closing down potential options, and repeating the mantra, “Better done than perfect.” After a day’s worth of work, there was tremendous relief in finally signing off on that project and emailing it to the person looking for the results.

Then with a brief mental break from the computer, selecting the slides for the presentation became a snap; it was finished in 90 minutes!

As much as I thought that I had the creative depth to move both efforts ahead virtually simultaneously, I couldn’t. The creative reserves necessary for the project didn’t leave enough free space in my mind to work on the presentation.

So the next time the strategic and creative juices aren’t there for a project, ask yourself, “Is there something else hanging over my head?” If there is, see if you can take the steps to get the “something else” completed or delegated to someone else so that you have the max headroom for creativity.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Too many research reports are a jumble of charts, arrows, and statements that simply play back what’s on the graphic (or worse, just regurgitate a chart’s methodology). For senior executives, that translates into a confusing (and at best, boring) jumble of information – pointing in all kinds of directions without really telling them anything.

If you have research responsibility, apply this maxim for great strategic thinking from Gary Singer, a wonderful strategist and the Chief Strategy Officer at Interbrand. His comment to me was:

  • Good researchers go to the edge of the data and step back – to be cautious & statistically sound.
  • Good consultants go to the edge of the data and stop – to be sure they’re on solid footing & that the client will buy off.
  • Great strategic thinkers go to the edge of the data, formulate a sound next set of assumptions that the audience can comment on & agree to, and then keep going to expand understanding & get to revealing insights.

It’s a simple statement and hard to do, but done successfully, it promises incredible business results. Use it as your new strategic hurdle to clear!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The end of the year used to be a rather slack time at work. That changed about a dozen years ago, and ever since, December has been one of the most frantic times of the year. Add to that the holiday rush, and it all adds up to a lot of to-do’s that need prioritization.

Here’s an alternative that’s helpful when you have many other people depending directly on the completion of your to-do’s so that they can take action.

Instead of using the typical importance vs. urgency prioritization, create a grid that pairs urgency (how soon the to-do needs to get done) with the degree to which someone else is depending on the to-do as a next step for them (great dependency to little dependency). Now place each of your to-do items on this grid, thinking about near-term items that others are really depending on as a first priority.

Using this approach will give you a little different picture of your priorities, as you orient your to-do list to the importance of helping others first. And that’s what the holidays are all about!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Jay Conrad Levinson is the father of guerrilla marketing, the concept that businesses can reap greater rewards through the strategic use of low- and no-cost marketing tools. He says that there are at least 100 guerrilla marketing tools available to any business.

Beyond the standard tool list that Levinson uses, I’ve found it helpful to get marketing teams to work through a specific question-based exercise to identify marketing tools unique or at least specific to their own businesses.

Use the list below with your marketing team. One way is for a team member to identify as many answers to a specific question as possible within a 3 minute period, and then rotate the question to the next team member to build on the list:

  • What do we want to promote?
  • What are our features, benefits & competitive advantages? Which are most meaningful?
  • What communications vehicles are in place?
  • What ideas/words/phrases do we use?
  • Who are experts/partners? What’s notable about them?
  • Where do our audiences congregate (geographically or virtually) and/or receive our messages?
  • What motivates our audiences?
  • How can we get permission and the info to keep marketing to our audiences?
  • What business & personal relationships do we have that could be of assistance?
  • Who would like to be involved with us in growing our business?
  • Who could we help make more successful?
  • What interactions do we have with our audience?
  • What new interactions can we create?
  • What tools or ideas can we “steal”?

I’ve had a team of 8 to 10 people build a list of more than 200 tools (many of which they’d never thought of using) within a 25 minute period as everyone worked individually using the rotating question approach.

You can also check out a more focused set of areas to brainstorm and identify specific social media resources and tools your organization can use.

Give this exercise a try at your next staff meeting or planning session, and then go back through your marketing plan to make sure you’re using as many of the tools as possible that you’ve identified.  – Mike Brown

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can develop an integrated, guerrilla marketing-oriented strategy for your brand.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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