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A linkbait article showed up on Facebook the other day about an atheist (who called himself, “Not gonna pray”) writing to Andrew W.K., the advice columnist at the Village Voice. The letter was about the foolishness of praying for his brother who had just been diagnosed with cancer.

The linkbait part of the headline focused on the columnist’s response which was, of course, labeled “EPIC.”

Andrew W.K.’s response focused, in part, on the humility prayer requires and the importance of understanding our place in creation. He pointed out that getting on your knees to pray is “about showing respect for the size and grandeur of what we call existence — it’s about being humble in the presence of the vastness of life, space, and sensation, and acknowledging our extremely limited understanding of what it all really means.”

Prayer-Atheist

He went on to suggest to “Not gonna pray” that out of respect for his grandmother’s request for prayer, he should get down on his knees and think about his brother (part of creation) as hard as he can. Think about him more than he ever had before. Think about all the wonderful aspects of him and “tell him” how much the letter writer loves him.

The article concluded by mentioning how powerful the response from Andrew W.K. was. This was required to reinforce how “EPIC” it was, and simply good form since about 90% of the linkbait article was lifted directly from the Village Voice (a great example of really poor content curation). Hundreds of comments followed and ads for articles on miracle pills, drunken celebrity moments, and important laws I need to know about in Overland, KS rounded out the article. (All that is why I’m not including a link to the linkbait article; you have enough details to search for it if you want to read it.)

The Linkbait Article on Prayer Got ONE Part Right

Since this is an example of prayer being discussed in social media, I’m jumping on it as a strategic thinking topic ideal for Brainzooming that needn’t be relegated to my long-dormant spirituality blog.

Andrew W.K. DID make an EPIC point in his response about prayer: the absolute importance of humility and the realization that no matter how much we want to think, believe, and fool ourselves, we AREN’T in control of the bigger picture. From trying in fits and starts to develop my own prayer life, that’s an unmistakable conclusion.

The unfortunate part of the response is that he suggests “Not gonna pray” should pray to “creation” (which can do nothing about prayer) instead of the “creator.” He wants “Not gonna pray” to be humbled next to a creation that, quite frankly, as a human being with incredible abilities to think, to reason, to understand his place in creation, and to participate in a spiritual life, he is SUPERIOR to in the most important ways.

It’s one thing to think you are “praying” to your brother, and essentially sending him good thoughts. And I guess that’s become the popular, watered-down version of what prayer is since people are allowed to talk about it without being too offensive or triggering a lawsuit from someone who doesn’t believe in prayer and feels his or her sensibilities are being trampled by others praying.

It’s one thing, but it’s a little tiny portion of prayer.

Prayer to the Creator IS EPIC

At the heart of prayer is demonstrating our humility to the creator (and not aspects of creation) and becoming open, willing, and eager to understand and actively participate in what we CAN understand of God’s plan.

And that does require humility, and a complete sense that we don’t control things as we might like to believe.

While you might think this topic is far afield for Brainzooming, the original linkbait article showed up in my Facebook feed with a well-known social media expert saying it was a great example of why you might like prayer. Since he’s only about 25% right, as may be the case on many topics on which he purports to be an expert, it’s fair game for somebody out here to fill in the other 75% of the answer he missed.

And for my friends who have said to me, “I don’t understand how someone so analytical and so focused on strategic thinking can believe in prayer,” I have one thing to say. My belief doesn’t come from fuzzy feelings. My belief comes from demonstrated evidence on a daily basis: the more I surrender, the more I give up control, the more I look to the creator as the source of direction in my life, the more things make sense in the big picture.

It’s not a feeling for me. It’s a daily proof.

And, in my humility and inadequacies as a person, that proof is EPIC. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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It may simply be my reading habits, or the sources where I see articles on business and strategic thinking, but it seems so much business content you read touts “do this, do that, never do that thing.”

Reader-Cleveland-Library

While knowing dos and don’ts is helpful, articles written in that manner need to come with a huge red disclaimer reading:

“Remember your situation could be entirely different than the ones we’re talking about. You might need to do the things we say not to, and don’t do the things we recommend. Without knowing you and your situation, we really have no business thinking we can do your strategic thinking for you or saying what to do or don’t do as emphatically as this article implies.”

Hardly any dos and don’ts article EVER comes packaged with any such disclaimer, though.

In fact, most business articles that seem to get big attention from readers are the most strident in asserting that things are always or never a certain way the author addresses.

But it’s ridiculous to think an author, especially one whose experience and qualifications are sketchy, has any basis to speak as definitively as they do on what will and won’t work in your business.

So, please, please be careful with what your read and do your own strategic thinking.

Consider the ideas, but apply them with caution and depend on yourself for all the strategic thinking and decisions you need to make! – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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The ever-growing Content Marketing World is next week in Cleveland. I’ll be co-presenting a session with global content marketing expert and author, Pam Didner, on Maximizing Content Opportunities at Events.

It’s always great to get back to Northeast Ohio. The experience will be enhanced by presenting with Pam Didner as her new book on Global Content Marketing launches (affiliate link).

Pam will be quick to tell you, however, that she won’t be talking about any book material in our presentation!

Maximizing Content and Experience Strategy at Content Marketing World

CMWorld-PresentationWhat we WILL be discussing is something we’ve characterized as a two-part case study on a transformational business event.

Pam participated in the most recent C2 conference, a very different type of event that bills itself as a “business conference somewhere between genius and insanity.” Pam will open our session with the perspective that at an event such as C2, content and experience are identical. She’ll back that up from an experiential perspective and interviews with C2 organizers.

In my portion of the case study presentation, we’ll look at C2 in the same way Brainzooming evaluates many strategies. We’ll reverse engineer the experience to identify the types of models, concepts, and strategic thinking questions that would allow another organization to replicate the same type of feel and success in their own situation. In fact, I’m in the midst of developing a download with (by current count) 250 models, concepts, ideas, and strategic thinking questions attendees can use to design their own experiences and events to maximize content creation.

Join Us at Content Marketing World

If you are attending Content Marketing World, we’d love to have you our Wednesday, September 10th session (11:30 a.m. EDT). If you are there, message me and let’s try to meet up amid the sea of orange at Content Marketing World.

Look for updates on Twitter and here on the blog during the event next week! – Mike Brown

 

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“How strong is my organization’s social media strategy?”

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question.

Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social  Strategy.”

           (Affiliate Link)

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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woody-bendleThe last few days, I’ve been enjoying some incredible BBQ ribs from customer experience strategy and innovation expert Woody Bendle.

And let me tell you: as smart as Woody is about branding and innovation, he’s just as great making ribs! I paired Woody’s ribs with barbeque sauce my wife makes from the recipe at the restaurant my parents used to own, and WOW!

Even though I can’t share the ribs with all of you, they inspired me to put together a retrospective of Woody’s blog posts on Brainzooming. He’s always a popular guest author, and since he hasn’t been able to write as much for the Brainzooming blog this year, I wanted to make sure our newest readers knew about all of Woody’s great content.

So without delay, dive in to Woody’s great strategic thinking, while I have one more meal of diving into Woody’s great barbeque!

Brand Strategy

Customer Focus and Customer Experience

Innovation

Strategic Thinking and Creative Thinking

Business Rants

Potpourri

 

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Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Guest Author

The Brainzooming blog has a wonderful group of guest authors who regularly contribute their perspectives on strategy, creativity, and innovation. You can view guest author posts by clicking on the link below.

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Talk to B2B service or product providers and you’ll likely hear about solution selling.

Fair enough. You don’t want to buy something and still have the problem afterward. You want your problem to go away and never come back another day.

The challenge is there are often multiple problems and multiple solutions. If it’s unclear which problem and which solution the potential client and provider are trying to address, the provider’s proposed solution can be way off the mark. If multiple providers are competing for the opportunity, they may be trying to solve different problems. That further adds to the likelihood of problem-solution mismatches.

We had one recently.

A potential client had already identified a time window for a strategic thinking session, the senior management group to participate, and the expectation of having a productive conversation leading to greater brand strategy clarity.

The company had contacted another firm to facilitate the discussion. Due to schedule conflicts, the other potential provider referred the company to us at the last minute. With no actual direct conversation with the potential client, we created a strategic thinking session plan for answering the brand strategy questions and issues we identified based on skeletal information.

Brainzooming Strategic Thinking Session

A Brainzooming strategic thinking session. Photo courtesy of Jason Harper.

After multiple emails, we finally talked with the client two days before the planned discussion time. Everything was going well as we discussed our approach and the proposed end deliverable: a definitive, consensus-oriented, strategic roadmap for the company to address its brand situation.

Then we got to the price.

Our price was five times higher than what the other potential provider proposed.

Doh!

Discussing this with the potential client, the difference was clear.

The other provider’s solution was showing up to be a neutral, albeit knowledgeable party, who would “host” a discussion.

That was a solution, but only to a VERY narrow interpretation of the problem, i.e., managing the allotted time for a discussion with a little follow up.

We were addressing delivering the answer they needed to move forward with a brand strategy and implementation in the few months their management group is expecting. We’d proposed addressing the bigger problem the potential client was admittedly facing. The other provider had proposed (and set a price expectation) for a small solution to a much narrower problem.

The big learning was even though I don’t use the term, we are solution selling. We don’t just show up and facilitate. We identify, plan, manage, and deliver a strategic outcome. In other words, our focus is creating strategic impact. That’s why we ensure all the planning and meeting conditions lead to a real result. That’s why we create a definitive series of exercises leading to the desired strategic outcome.

That’s why we don’t simply stand in front of a whiteboard, ask a few questions, and capture some notes.

It’s all part of the difference between facilitating a meeting and creating strategic impact. – Mike Brown

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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We’ve designed and delivered many creating strategic impact workshop sessions for clients this year. No two sessions have been identical because we design each workshop to the client’s specific learning objectives. Today, we’re delivering a strategic kickoff meeting workshop for an organization working to dramatically improve its strategic planning process for 2015.

Since 2015 planning is right around the corner for many companies, it’s the ideal time to look at the value of a 2015 strategic kickoff meeting and include one on your planning calendar.

Top 10 Reasons to Have a 2015 Strategic Kickoff Meeting Soon

Strategic-FakeBook-Workshop

Based on our clients’ various objectives, here are the top 10 reasons to have a 2015 strategic kickoff meeting:

  1. It’s the right time to boost everyone’s skills in strategic, creating thinking.
  2. There’s still time to tweak your annual planning process so it is more productive as you plan for next year’s success.
  3. It’s possible within a few days to organize a Brainzooming strategic thinking workshop closely aligned to your organization’s strategic direction and priorities.
  4. Having a strategic planning kickoff meeting allows you to address skills gaps with your team relative to strategic thinking and successful implementation.
  5. Whether your focus is a small team or dozens of line managers, we can adjust a strategic kickoff meeting to help everyone productively align on important objectives.
  6. You can customize your strategic kickoff meeting from hundreds of Brainzooming strategic thinking exercises so your business objectives dictate the activities your team learns and practices.
  7. It’s a fantastic way to let the organization’s leaders actively participate with the team instead of becoming bogged down in meeting details and trying to facilitate.
  8. If you are in an advertising agency, consulting, or service business, a strategic kickoff meeting serves as a professional development boost for your staff.
  9. A strategic kickoff is a fantastic way to involve your non-profit’s board of directors more actively in understanding and positively contributing to the organization’s future success.
  10. You’ll hear comments afterward from your team such as:

Yes, strategic thinking can be both engaging and clearly beneficial for your organization’s success. We don’t think there’s any other way to do it!

Are you ready to schedule your strategic kickoff meeting?

What do you think?

We have the capacity to develop and schedule your 2015 strategic kickoff meeting. Or if you’re well into planning already, we can orient the workshop content toward creating strategic impact and a focus on successful implementation for 2015.

Give us a call at 816-509-5320 or email at info@brainzooming.com, and let us get to work on your kickoff meeting! – Mike Brown

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Learn all about how Mike Brown’s workshops on creating strategic impact can boost your success!

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’ve had several coaching conversations about career challenges with multiple individuals who thought their jobs might be in danger.

One theme through all of them was how to really figure out your career situation if you suspect your job is in danger. Sometimes it’s obvious you’re on the bubble. Some people seem to always miss the obvious, however, especially when the obvious is about them.

Last-Day-Mug

11 Questions to Ask If You Think Your Job Is In Danger

Those coaching conversations led to this list of eleven questions about an individual’s organizational impact. If you suspect your job is in danger (or even if you don’t), honestly ask yourself these questions. They range across a variety of ways individuals can make an organizational impact through the value they deliver

If I weren’t here, would the organization . . .

  1. Lose any customers?
  2. See a revenue decline?
  3. Be less profitable (or financially successful)?
  4. Be a less compelling investment?
  5. Suffer a negative impact in reputation?
  6. Lose out on an incredible brand ambassador?
  7. Suffer from a major loss of intellectual capital?
  8. Become less efficient?
  9. Experience a major loss in quality or effectiveness?
  10. Be asked why I was no longer there?
  11. Notice the difference two months after I’ve left?

This list of organizational impact questions is not tested, and it’s not necessarily comprehensive.

But if you can’t find at least one or two undisputable “Yes” answers amid the list (and “maybe” or “a little” aren’t “yes”), you are simply a cog in your organization – and a pretty expendable and easily replaced one at that.

What to do next to improve your career success?

Your inability to answer any of these career success questions affirmatively means it’s past time to decide how you’re going to change your career situation where you are. Alternatively, it’s time to find a new place where you can develop and play a critical role.

And if you do neither, you’re just living on borrowed time, which is no way to live your career. – Mike Brown

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.


Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative thinking and ideas! For an organizational innovation and strategic thinking success boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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