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An attendee at the Curacao Social Media and Content Marketing Strategy Workshop raised a new (for me) and pertinent question: What are ideas to go live with brand impact?

That’s a content marketing strategy topic I’ve been thinking about as more social platforms offer “go live” features, including Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Snapchat, and Tumblr.

His specific question was what to do to make it worthwhile for a brand, and how much to prepare so it doesn’t become embarrassing (or boring, or pointless) video content.

First, a quick disclaimer: I’ve NEVER gone live, although maybe we could with some of our Brainzooming events. We’ll have to see.

Nevertheless, thinking of content marketing strategy analogies, brands doing live video strikes me as very similar to “destination TV.”  Destination TV is a program the audience wants to watch in real-time the first time it airs so they aren’t susceptible to spoilers from friends that saw the program first and want to talk about what happened. Among the shows I’d put in the destination TV category are the Super Bowl (and perhaps a few other major sporting events), final episodes of popular TV shows, and major awards shows (Oscars, Grammys, etc.).

Countdown-6-TV

These also tend to be high viewership programs, which is what you want if you are going live! Another common characteristic is that broadcast networks never suddenly decide to go live and start sharing them without sometimes months of forewarning.

That’s a good starting point for how to “go live” differently than many brands are trying it right now. While the video is real-time, there should be ample preparation and promotion to lead to a great go live performance.

16 Ideas to Go Live with Brand Impact in Your Content Marketing Strategy

Using the three broadcast examples of destination TV as inspirations, here are 16 ideas for getting the most from your brand going live:

Preparation

  • Go live with events or people that your target audience has a high interest in wanting to see in live setting. Pre-existing popularity, hype, plus past and future rarity all help generate interest.
  • Plan out what will happen ahead of time, knowing where you want to start, end, and places things in between.
  • Help the participants in your live stream develop material and rehearse what they are going to say or do if at all possible. A live dress rehearsal has its precedents (see SNL).
  • Look at ways to integrate pre-packaged segments with the live video, even if it means going multi-platform.
  • Tack on related stories and content delving deeper into the subject to interest specific audience segments.

Promotion

  • Brand your go live segments as part of an ongoing series of events so the audience has more to look forward to in the future.
  • Begin promoting your brand going live well in advance. If having an audience is important, hit the messaging hard on WHEN you’ll be going live.
  • Heighten interest with unexpected guests or feature unusual pairings of people that are intriguing (or pairings that have never happened previously).
  • Incorporate surprise into your promotion. Create a live event situation where viewers might have some sense of what could happen when you’re going live, but they can’t be absolutely sure about it.
  • Invite the audience to participate in pre-show events planned before going live to build hype and anticipation.

Performance

  • Share older (but still relevant) content prior to when you go live.
  • Use a mix of scripted and impromptu segments within your live segment.
  • Record segments if need be, but broadcast them live. That’s what many virtual events do – they playback recorded talks, but take live audience questions.
  • Invite other parties outside your brand to cover / report on the live segment.
  • Create hoopla at the location from which you’ll be broadcasting to generate additional excitement (or another appropriate emotion) that will come through on the live video.
  • Embed cliff hangers into the content to create suspense. You could also create the cliffhangers prior to going live, and then resolve them when you go live.
  • Link partial content you’ve shared before the go live event to what happens live to flesh out a compelling brand story line.

Those are my thoughts on going live, all based off of thinking about a strategic analogy.

If we ever go live, look for more experience-based ideas! – Mike Brown

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When was the last time you invested 45 minutes to check your social media strategy?

9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy

Is your social media implementation working as well as it can? In less than 60 minutes with the new FREE Brainzooming ebook “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy,” you’ll have a precise answer to this question. Any executive can make a thorough yet rapid evaluation of nine different dimensions of their social media strategies with these nine diagnostics. Download Your Free Copy of “9 Diagnostics to Check Your Social Strategy.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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On Friday, June 17th, I was in Curaçao, located just north of Venezuela, to present a ¾ day workshop on social media and content marketing strategy for the Curaçao Tourist Board. Angelo Harms, the CTB’s digital marketing manager, was a great host and arranged the content marketing strategy workshop for eighty social media professionals in the island’s travel and hospitality industry.

Curacao Workshop Pic 2

For everyone that attended the workshop (and for those of you that weren’t there), here are links to much of the content I presented, plus a number of bonus topics I would have included given another day of teaching time!

The workshop and the entire trip generated a lot of questions, learnings, and lessons. Look for a variety of blogged posts planned for the near future to share more about content marketing, branding, and customer service learned going to and from this wonderful island.

If you’re looking for a new, warm, colorful, photogenic place to vacation, you owe it to yourself to visit Curaçao!

43 Resources for Strategic Branding and Engagement with Social Media and Content Marketing

Linking Business Objectives to Social and Content Marketing

Curacao Cover

Creating Fantastic Branded Content

Boosting Productivity as a Small Solo Social Media Department

Mike Brown

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I was talking with an executive charged with implementing an innovation strategy for a new company initiative. While the business objectives and expectations are lofty, the budget available to fund the innovation strategy has disappeared. The company pulled the funding because of a soft business environment and quarterly earnings pressure.

I suspect this isn’t the only such case out there like this right now.

As many companies near the end of the quarter, discretionary budgets are often scrutinized much more closely than business objectives. Budget dollars disappear, but expectations for innovation and growth remain.

16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

If you’re facing a comparable situation, you’ll want our new Brainzooming eBook, 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy.

Accelerate-Cover

Accelerate features sixteen strategic thinking questions to expand your possibilities for finding ways to move ahead with your innovation strategy even if your available dollars have disappeared.

And another great thing about Accelerate, especially if you really have no budget? It’s a free Brainzooming eBook!

You can use the strategic thinking questions in Accelerate to identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy.

Accelerate is the first in a new series of eBooks we’ll be releasing in the coming months to help you work around common barriers to business innovation.

Download Accelerate today. You can use it to surprise your organization with your ability to keep things going with your innovation strategy EVEN IF people and dollars evaporate mid-year! – Mike Brown

 

Find New Resources to Innovate!

FREE Download: 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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My natural inclination when it comes to business strategy is to identify what is MOST IMPORTANT and build everything around that. Tie the objectives, priorities, and strategies to a very tight focus for an organization. Mass the resources and the organization’s attention on that single area and put everything toward implementing it successfully.

My most memorable example of this goes back to early in my career.  There was a nearly month-long labor strike at the transportation company where I worked. During that time when we were laying off people on a weekly basis as the strike drug on, it was clear to everyone that the single focus for us as a marketing organization was to win back customers for the day we started our operation back up – whenever that might be. I inherited leadership of our department about a week into the strike, and we pointed EVERYONE toward understanding current customer sentiment and developing the plan to incent them to use our brand again even though we had let them down.

THAT was a singular focus.

Granted, it is SO MUCH EASIER to talk about a single, focused business strategy than it is to actually create one.

There always seem to be multiple important things or varied priorities among senior leaders or business units that do not line up in a neat and clean rank order. I’m sure you’ve experienced one of those “our three most important objectives” situations. Yes we have a priority; in fact, we have THREE priorities that are ALL EQUAL.

That’s the MUCH MORE TYPICAL business strategy scenario.

When we started developing our varied extreme creativity questions and exercises to drive bolder business strategy, however, one of the approaches was to actively consider that an organization isn’t going to make choices. It would deliberately and actively pursue multiple big strategies with all available resources.

fork-in-road-quickie

So instead of taking ONE business strategy path and wondering about the other, how about taking BOTH PATHS and doing more? What would the business strategy look like if you did it deliberately instead of by accident? – Mike Brown

 

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Looking for a Successful Innovation Strategy to Grow Your Business?
Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookBusiness growth can depend on introducing new products and services that resonate more strongly with customers and deliver outstanding value compared to what’s currently available.

Are you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise eBook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE eBook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!





Download Your Free  Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Fake Book




Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Based on several stories last week extolling the benefits of being “lazy” when it comes to innovation strategy, you would think the LAZY days of summer are here a few weeks early (at least in the northern hemisphere).

Lazy is hardly a sentiment you typically associate with innovation strategy, which is why these articles caught my eye.

Execution, a bias for action, and trying lots of things and failing fast are all descriptors you are much more likely to employ when describing a successful innovation strategy.

Yet, consider these stories. In one way or another, each suggests the advantages of laziness when it comes to trying new things, especially acquisitions.

4 Examples Where NOT Acting Might Be a Smarter Innovation Strategy

Stop-Sign

“Dollar General’s Buck Goes Far” by Steven Russolillo in the Wall Street Journal highlights how Dollar General seems to have come out the stronger player for being on the outside looking in as competitor Dollar Tree acquired Family Dollar Stores in a $9 billion deal. The story recounts typical post-acquisition issues (integration takes longer than planned, cultures and business styles don’t match up, risks are more significant than expected) to explain while Dollar General is stronger for not making a major acquisition.

Another Wall Street Journal article from Dan Gallagher, “Focus Is In, Scale Is Out for Tech Giants” recounts how tech giants Microsoft and HP are both unwinding acquisitions. The individual deals were originally characterized for each company as an important part of its growth and innovation strategy. Microsoft is shuttering most of its $7 billion Nokia acquisition as it lays off more than 1,800 people from its smartphone division. HP is merging its service business with Computer Sciences Corp., as it gets out of the $13.9 billion business it acquired from EDS. Within the fast moving tech sector, these deals once looked critical for scale, but now are seen as inhibiting agility and the flexibility to move with the market.

Finally, in a seemingly far afield example, George Varga interviewed musician, Billy Joel for the San Diego Union Tribune. The thrust of the article was that Joel, who hasn’t released a recording of new pop songs since 1993, has little interest in writing or recording new songs. This extends to the classically-oriented pieces he finds more creatively intriguing. Joel is hardly hurting from his blatant strategy to NOT create new material. Instead, he’s using his catalog of hit songs as a cash cow, grossing $31.7 in concert revenue in 2015 from playing just 30 shows. Twelve of those were in New York at Madison Square Garden.

You generally think of a successful innovation strategy as leading to doing new things and pushing boundaries.

Maybe when developing an innovation strategy, however, it’s worth a quick check to see if doing nothing MIGHT be the best answer after all. – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Looking for a Successful Innovation Strategy to Grow Your Business?
Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookBusiness growth can depend on introducing new products and services that resonate more strongly with customers and deliver outstanding value.

Are you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise eBook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE eBook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!





Download Your Free  Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Fake Book




Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I suspect many, if not most industries, know there’s an elusive brand promise customers have been requesting for a long time that no competitor has figured out yet.

Or maybe a competitor HAS figured out how to deliver the brand promise, but it can’t do it profitably, efficiently, or consistently.

One competitive response is to try to explain to customers why they don’t really need what they think they need. Alternatively, competitors may try to convince customers they don’t really want to buy the elusive brand promise they say they want to buy, no matter how vehemently the marketplace may say otherwise.

A bold competitor, however, will heavy up with tremendous intensity and deliver the incredible, elusive brand promise in a truly disruptive fashion.

10xMoreEffort

What type of competitor are you going to be?

One that drags its feet?

Or the competitor that drags all the other competitors kicking and screaming into a new market reality.

Of course, you know what the RIGHT answer is! – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

Looking for a Successful Innovation Strategy to Grow Your Business?
Brainzooming Has an Answer!

Brainzooming Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Tools eBookBusiness growth can depend on introducing new products and services that resonate more strongly with customers and deliver outstanding value compared to what’s currently available.

Are you prepared to take better advantage of your brand’s customer and market insights to generate innovative product ideas? The right combination of outside perspectives and productive strategic thinking exercises enables your brand to ideate, prioritize, and propel innovative growth.

Download this free, concise eBook to:

  • Identify your organization’s innovation profile
  • Rapidly deploy effective strategic thinking exercises to spur innovation
  • Incorporate market-based perspectives into your innovation strategy in successful ways

Download this FREE eBook to turn ideas into actionable innovation strategies to drive your organization’s comeback!





Download Your Free  Outside-In Innovation Strategic Thinking Fake Book




Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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There are soooooooooooooo many ways to generate creative ideas.

One way is to come up with a name that inspires an idea. When you check the name, it doesn’t work (or someone has already used it), but the idea has some possibilities, so you run with it.

That’s what has happened here.

A name for a new Friday feature popped into my head at a conference. Unfortunately, the name is already “a thing,” although not that big of a thing. But enough of a thing that there was no credible way to claim that it was unique to the Brainzooming blog.

Since the idea worked, however, we’re running with the concept and resurrecting a feature name we haven’t used for quite some time: Creative Quickies. These features will include photos and strategic thinking questions or innovation prompts.

strategic-thinking-question-innovation-Frideas

And just as we hope for all Fridays, future Creative Quickies will be fast, fun, and stimulating enough (via strategic thinking questions) to give you something to ponder and act upon when you return to the office the following week. Enjoy! – Mike Brown

 

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Learn all about how Mike Brown’s workshops on creating strategic impact can boost your success!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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