Compilations | The Brainzooming Group - Part 15 – page 15
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HappyNewYearI have never been big on New Year’s resolutions. Seeing articles over the weekend about New Year’s resolutions people are making, however, prompted going back to see what Brainzooming blog articles could help with some of the more common types of New Year’s resolutions. If you are resolving to improve your productivity (especially with social media), career, and stress levels in the new year, here are seven articles to help you get started with your New Year’s resolutions:

Get Organized and Improve Your Productivity

Social Media Productivity

To get the most from your social media time investment, try balancing your efforts between listening, participating in others’ social media outlets, and creating content in your own social media hangouts. Whenever you create content, make sure to use it in as many places as possible. Check out these 13 ideas for improving your social media productivity.

Weaning Yourself from Too Much Time on Social Media

Backing away from social media involves coming to grips with not trying to see, read, review, and reply to everything zinging around within your virtual social network. These nine tips point to the importance of using your social network to cover your gaps and let you off the hook on knowing everything going on as it happens.

Improve Your Career

Taking Care of Your Own Professional Learning at Very Low Cost

There is no excuse for not seeking out professional development, even if there are not many dollars available for it in your company’s budget. These 10 ideas are relatively low cost and you can implement them throughout 2012 to keep you sharp professionally at a very reasonable investment.

Be a Better Business Networker

I will readily admit that being a better business networker is not one of my strengths. Networking situations are a challenge for me, so these five tips are as much about making it easier for the other person to be a better business networker as they are about making you more effective. What is nice is everyone benefits from applying them in real life networking situations!

Creating a Personal Social Media Presence to Catch up with Everyone Else

Yes, there are people who have not fully exploited social networks to display their talents and help them in their careers. This video overview highlights 11 steps to jump-start your social networking presence with an eye toward highlighting your career experience. The one addition I would make to the video is building in a step for a concentrated Facebook effort as another way to tap your personal network in your career pursuits.

Improving Your Leadership Skills

No big surprises here, but it is still a tough list of ideas to carry out: it is all about honesty, integrity, focusing on helping others, being distinctive. If you really display all these, however, you will definitely stand out in today’s workplace.

Managing Your Stress Levels

Staying Out of Negative Situations

This list started life as a post for a friend who needed to check out and get out of a variety of not only non-productive, but also emotionally taxing situations. It was either get out of them or start losing a sense of his identity. Those types of situations are bad, yet we all face them.  – Mike Brown

 

Download the free ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

 

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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15

I’ve written a variety of blog posts with blogging topic ideas with things to blog about when you’re out of ideas. When I see someone on Twitter expressing frustration with a writers’ block on their blog, I enjoy reaching out and sharing links with blogging topic ideas to get their creativity going again. Rather than continuing to cram multiple links in a single tweet about writers’ block, it seemed time to compile a big list of blogging topic ideas, especially for business bloggers.

If you’re stuck thinking about what blogging topics you can write about when you’re out of ideas, take a look through these ideas. I attempted to make these blogging topic ideas general enough they would have wide applicability, irrespective of your industry or business blogging focus.

This list is a start. Expect it to grow over time, hopefully with your ideas!  – Mike Brown

Use the Crowd

1. Announce a meet-up for local social media friends where people can trade topic ideas.

2. Answer questions your customers or readers have asked you.

3. Ask a question of your readers to see what they think.

4. Ask readers what they’d like to read about (without any prompting on topics).

5. Ask the next 5 people you meet to answer the same question and write their responses in a blog post.

6. Ask your spouse or significant other what you could write about.

7. Contact a couple of readers, ask them a question, and report their perspectives.

8. Interview a customer about what their concerns and challenges are.

9. Look for blog titles on Twitter and then write your own version of a post to go with the title.

10. Solicit guest blog posts from readers.

11. Solicit guest blog posts from business partners.

12. Run an online survey for readers and report the results.

13. Throw out a question on Facebook or Google+ and let the responses shape a blog post.

14. Publish a list of potential topics for the next month and let readers decide what they’d like to read.

Share What You Know

15. Interview yourself on a topic.

16. Recap a past event.

17. Recap the results of a research report someone else published.

18. Report on a conference you attended.

19. Reveal background information on something you do to make your organization successful.

20. Share really cool work you or someone in your organization has done.

21. Share the results of some research your organization has done.

22. Summarize what you know about a topic.

23. Write about things that you know that others might not realize.

24. Write about what you do in your business to serve customers.

Teach Others

25. Expand your thinking on a previously published blog post to make it more teaching-oriented.

26. Take a new angle on a topic you’ve written about already.

27. Teach a new technique or tip you’ve been using.

28. Write about something you learned in the last week that you can share with readers.

29. Demonstrate a process your company uses that could be valuable to your audience.

30. Answer frequently asked questions that require demonstrations.

31. Feature experts in your business sharing their knowledge.

Create Lists

32. List what is more thrilling (or easy or exciting) for you right now than writing a blog.

33. Make a long list of ideas your readers could use.

34. Make a short list of steps readers can take to accomplish something.

35. Write anything that allows you to put a number in the title.

36. Add some additional items to a list you’ve already published.

37. List the types of customer problems you routinely solve.

38. List questions you’re getting in customer service.

39. Ask readers a question and report the answers in a list.

40. List the steps in a process readers could handle for themselves.

Share Opinions

41. Write what you think about a topic or a news story.

42. Disagree with a well-known blogger or social media celebrity.

43. Grab a relevant book off your bookshelf, open to a page, and write a response to one of the ideas.

44. Predict what you think will happen in the future.

45. React to opinions your business competitor or an industry figure is talking about.

46. Review a book or magazine article you’ve read recently.

47. Review a fantastic product or service you use in your organization.

48. Review something people are thinking about in your marketplace.

49. Share a half-baked idea to see if your readers can finish baking it for you.

50. Write a blog post that’s only 80% of the way done and allow readers to take a shot at finishing it.

51. Write about something completely obvious as if you’re the first person to ever think of it.

52. Write about something completely obvious in a way you haven’t written before.

53. Write about something you think will interest readers more than what you’ve been writing about recently.

Make It More Personal

54. Complain about a recent customer experience you’ve had.

55. Have your kid write or draw something.

56. Recount the story of a family pet who died.

57. Share an anecdote that happened in your organization.

58. Share random thoughts you’ve been trying to turn into complete blog posts.

59. Share your experiences with struggling to come up with ideas for blogging.

60. Talk about something you’re not good at doing.

61. Thank one of your customers who has been loyal to your business.

62. Use the first idea that comes into your mind and tie it to what your blog is about.

63. Write about the most interesting thing that happened to you today, yesterday, or this week.

64. Write about the story behind writing the most popular post you’ve ever written.

65. Write about what inspires you.

66. Write about what you do in your spare time that’s relevant and interesting.

67. Write about what you would have written about in an earlier period of your life – when you were in school, early career, etc.

68. Write something dramatically more or less outrageous than what you typically write.

69. Write something that allows you to name drop social media people who will share the post within their networks.

70. Write whatever is on your mind now and don’t self-censor it.

Repurpose Content

71. Combine smaller posts you’ve already written into a longer one.

72. Expand a comment you wrote on another blog into a full blog post.

73. Group a bunch of tweets you’ve made into a list or other blog post.

74. Organize (in new ways) relevant information that’s already been published.

75. Publish a list of links from your blog that make it easier to find everything on a particular topic.

76. Publish a presentation you’ve made on Slideshare and embed it in a blog post.

77. Re-edit and freshen something you’ve already written with new content.

78. Re-run the most popular post you’ve ever done.

79. Share an intriguing video that’s already done (by you or others) with a few comments to give your thoughts about it.

80. Start tweeting small thoughts and turn whatever comes out into a blog post.

81. Write up the points you cover in a slide from one of your Powerpoint presentations.

82. Embed a funny or on-target cartoon.

Use Video or Images

83. Have someone video you doing a brief commentary.

84. Video a demonstration relevant to your audience.

85. Video an interview with a work colleague or business partner.

86. Ask the next 5 people you meet to answer the same question on video and edit the responses into a video post.

87. Use all photos and very few words.

88. Feature photos of your organization members doing interesting things (btw, people standing in line posing for a picture isn’t interesting.)

89. Video a customer talking about their business.

90. Have two customers interview each other.

91. Video a day in the life of your customer service organization.

92. Shoot a short video sharing some real reasons why someone should Like your page you on Facebook.

Starting Over

93. Throw out every idea you have and start all over with new topics.

What topics would you add to the list?

 

If you’re struggling with determining ROI and evaluating its impacts, download “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track” today!  This innovative article provides a concise, strategic view of the numbers and stories that matter in shaping, implementing, and evaluating your strategy. You’ll learn lessons about when to address measurement strategy, identifying overlooked ROI opportunities, and creating an innovative 6-metric dashboard. Download Your Free Copy of “6 Social Media Metrics You Must Track!”

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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7

The original “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” presentation and innovation ebook were developed when Max Utsler asked me to speak to his class at The University of Kansas on innovation perspectives in marketing communications. In many ways, that innovation presentation in 2004 started me down the career path I’ve been on ever since.

I’m back tonight with Max Utsler’s class sharing the “Taking the No Out of Innovation” presentation along with a new social media project Brainzooming is helping Max and Barrett Sydnor implement for their  fall semester classes at The University of Kansas. Dubbed “Blogapalooza” by Max, the social media project will introduce students to blogging and creating social media content in front of multiple audiences . . . but more on Blogapalooza later.

To make “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” presentation content more accessible from among the 1,000-plus posts on the Brainzooming blog, here are the 8 innovation perspectives contained in the presentation and links to supporting content reaching back to the earliest Brainzooming posts.

Introspective

Create a stronger innovation perspective by understanding your distinctive talents.

Diverse

Surround yourself with a creative team that complements your distinctive talents.

Forgetful

Strike the right balance between using and turning off your expertise to boost creative thinking.

Borrower

Borrow from any inputs you can to trigger creative ideas that you twist and shape to be your own.

Open to Possibilities

Hone your openness to what may today seem impossible or preposterous – that’s where you’ll find tomorrow’s innovation.

Inquisitive

Collect great questions that yield creative ideas and use them all the time.

A Creator

You have to do something with ideas. Selecting the best ones and moving forward with them is central to innovation.

Persistent

Innovation doesn’t necessarily come easy. When it comes to the “No” voices you’ll hear, be ready to dodge, morph, ignore, or otherwise blow them up. That takes persistence.

Summary

Mike Brown

 

Find New Resources to Innovate!

FREE Download: 16 Keys for Finding Resources to Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy

Accelerate-CoverYou know it’s important for your organization to innovate. One challenge, however, is finding and dedicating the resources necessary to develop an innovation strategy and begin innovating.

This Brainzooming eBook will help identify additional possibilities for people, funding, and resources to jump start your innovation strategy. You can employ the strategic thinking exercises in Accelerate to:

  • Facilitate a collaborative approach to identifying innovation resources
  • Identify alternative internal strategies to secure support
  • Reach out to external partners with shared interests in innovation

Download your FREE copy of Accelerate Your Innovation Strategy today! 

Download Your FREE Brainzooming eBook! Accelerate - 16 Keys to Finding Innovation Resources

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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1

Following-up the innovation and creativity training presentations I did yesterday at CreativeBloc 2011, here are 11 Brainzooming posts on enhancing your personal innovation perspective. These can personal innovation tune-ups come in handy when you need to work on making sure you’re not putting any of the NO’s into the inNOvation challenges you may be facing:

7 Lessons to Get Ready for Change Now – Set yourself up to be your most innovative with pre-planning.

Get on a Roll, Get Results – The value of pushing beyond typical constraints to build a string of improvements.

The Strategy for Exploiting Your Mindless Job – When you have untapped mental capacity in your job, take advantage of it to innovate in new areas.

Black and White Decision Making? Today, Change to Grey (and Vice Versa) – There are benefits to consciously changing your typical decision making style, even if temporarily.

Patience – Strategic Advantage or Disadvantage? – How patience will help you (and some ways it won’t) strategically.

2 Easy Strategies for Tackling Social Media – One App at a Time – With so many new applications flying at us weekly, here’s how to stay current without taking too much time.

Trendspotters’ Fab Five – Five vital perspectives to effectively identify trends suggesting potential innovation opportunities. This is a Blogging Innovation guest post.

Forgetting as an Innovation Strategy – Why letting go of your knowledge and experience can be vital to innovation efforts.

How Does Magic Happen? – Glitz is important to creativity and innovation, but hard work and determination are equally important.

When People Don’t Understand There Are Lots of Ways to Be Right – Finding ways to deal with a negative environment that’s hostile toward innovation.

3 Ways to Generate Innovative Business Ideas When You’re Very Experienced – Three ways to counteract the limitations experienced people can place on innovation efforts.  – Mike Brown

 

When it comes to conferences, high impact presentations, and live event social media content, The Brainzooming Group is expert at shaping the right strategy and implementation to create unique attendee experiences before, during, and after an event. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call 816-509-5320 to learn how we can do the same for your event!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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7

Business innovation and strategy were central topics when the Brainzooming blog’s precursor started in 2007. Since then, the content covered in the blog has grown and changed, but there’s a concerted effort to stay true to its initial strategic theme.

Following up the recent summary article with links on social media strategy, this list covers new business innovation articles from 2010. Most appeared on Brainzooming initially, but some were published exclusively as guest Brainzooming blogs on other websites.

Beyond this comprehensive list, another key business innovation reference on Brainzooming is the post “Taking the NO Out of Business InNOvation,” an overview of ten common situations blocking business innovation across companies.

INNOVATION STRATEGY

WHOLE BRAIN THINKING

INNOVATION TECHNIQUES

MARKET-DRIVEN INNOVATION

INNOVATION CHALLENGES

INNOVATION IN PRACTICE

For an additional innovative boost, download the free Brainzooming ebook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to enhance your creative perspective! For an organizational boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at brainzooming@gmail.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Powerful comparisons are important to many creative thinking exercises. While the types of comparisons may vary, for the more than twenty-five “Change Your Character” creative thinking exercises on the Brainzooming blog, delegating an opportunity or challenge to someone you wouldn’t typically think about selecting to do your work yields a wide variety of creative ideas.

Creative Ideas from an Unlikely Character?

The Change Your Character creative thinking exercises use someone in a completely different line of work to help you look at your own situation with a fresh perspective.

Here are the steps for Change Your Character:

  1. State the business challenge that you’re addressing – it could be an opportunity, a problem, a new process or approach, etc.
  2. Pick who you want to work on your situation. This could be a real person, a fictional or cartoon character, or even another business that faces an analogous situation.
  3. Once you’ve identified who you’ll put on the job, list 8 to 10 approaches that the person, character, or business uses to address opportunities or challenges.
  4. Using the 8 to 10 approaches, apply them to your situation to generate at least 3 new ideas each for solving it.

Each of the Change Your Character creative thinking exercises does steps 2 and 3 for you. This allows you to focus primarily on step 4 – creative idea generation.

25 “Change Your Character” Creative Thinking Exercises

Here’s a compilation of 25 of these creative thinking exercises you can bookmark for use in successfully addressing future opportunities. Within each category, the situations and characters covered are listed, along with a link to the original article.

Strategy

Relationship & Brand Building

Team Building

Management & Problem Solving

Professional Skills

Just a note – I used Bart Simpson recently, and it worked very well. Give it a try and have great success Changing Your Character! – Mike Brown

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Learn all about Mike Brown’s creative thinking and innovation presentations!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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14

Dilbert-ThinkerIn researching a presentation on cultivating strategic thinking, it’s clear there’s a significant gap between senior management expectations for strategic thinking effort (perhaps 1/3 of the senior team’s time) and what happens (typically less than 1 hour per month, if any time at all, is spent on strategic issues).

Why the gap?

Three potential reasons emerge:

By changing strategic thinking perspectives, it’s possible to address each of these gaps, and incorporate many people throughout an organization into strategic thinking.

Defining Strategic Thinking Simply

One reason strategic thinking doesn’t take place is there isn’t a clear understanding of what strategic thinking is. As a result, ill-fated attempts to be “strategic” fall short, creating a reluctance to deal with strategy.

It helps to start with a simple definition of “strategic thinking” to serve as a guide: Addressing Things that Matter with Insight & Innovation.

There are three important elements in the definition that shape great strategic thinking:

“Things that Matter” – Strategic thinking focuses on fundamental opportunities & issues driving the business, not on far away things that are irrelevant to moving the business ahead. To do this successfully, you have to:
  • Understand the Overall Business & Direction – What’s important to the business and its customers – past, present, & future? There are various questions whose answers identify this, but one of the best is, “What are we trying to achieve?” You can always return to this question to re-set a tactic-oriented discussion.
  • Realize there are Various Strategic Viewpoints – What’s strategic can differ on whether your view is company-wide, departmental, functional, or personal. Clearly identify which view your strategic thinking is addressing.
  • Take “Time” Out of Your Definition of Strategic – Strategic issues can take place this afternoon just as easily as in the future; just because something’s years from now doesn’t necessarily make it strategic. If you don’t realize this, you’ll never get to strategic discussions because the pressing issues of the business (which may be hugely strategic) are considered to be tactical concerns that need to be solved right away without a lot of thinking getting in the way.
  • Use Exercises Designed to Help Tackle Challenging Issues – Using strategic thinking exercises will help neutralize traditional (potentially biased) perspectives, reducing unproductive politics and blind spots that stifle strategic thinking.

“Insight” – Strategic thinking starts with relevant insights. Combine & analyze diverse information from various sources (especially external data) and identify relationships that can lead to dramatic impacts. You can start by assessing your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

“Innovation” – One of the best approaches to project future relevant events is to consider multiple perspectives and think through a full range of possibilities that may develop. Once again, there are simple question-based exercises that can help foster a more innovative look at the business.

Awakening Strategic Thinking

If senior managers are the only ones sanctioned to think strategically, that’s a real problem. A company’s senior team tends to view the world in a relatively homogenous manner – from having shared experiences to holding a common perspective on the company and the market.

Great strategic thinking comes from diverse perspectives, cultivated and managed toward a view of the current & future business environment that increases the likelihood of creating strategic impact. Achieving this means spreading strategic thinking responsibility throughout the business.

Here are some fundamentals for accomplishing this:

Keep track of who is thinking and how they think – In bringing people together for strategic thinking, make sure three vital perspectives are represented with people that have:

  • Solid, front-line business experience (to help frame business issues)
  • Broad functional knowledge (with an understanding of capabilities)
  • Creative energy (acting as catalysts to view things in new & unconventional ways)

Take time to think – Set aside time for strategic thinking. This requires a willingness to invest dedicated time to consider a lot of possibilities, to narrow focus to the best ones, and then to develop & implement them. Focused time helps create an environment allowing people to selectively turn off conventional wisdom, triggering many more possibilities.

Use structure to increase output and efficiency – In initial phases, brainstorming rules help to productively manage how people with varied perspectives can increase the number of ideas generated very efficiently. Some starting principles include:

A Couple of Strategic Thinking Tools

Here are many productive question-based strategic thinking exercises for a broad set of business situations. These two provide a sampling:

“Where Do We Add Value?”

The first one is an assessment-based exercise focusing on where a business or internal department adds value for its customers. Themes that emerge help to identify areas for near term focus or elimination.

First, answer the following questions. Ideally this would take place in a pre-session survey:

  • What are the TOP 3 things we do that ADD INCREDIBLE VALUE for customers?
  • What are the TOP 3 things we do that DON’T DELIVER INCREDIBLE VALUE because we can’t/don’t focus enough time, attention, and/or resources on them?
  • What are the TOP 3 things we do that ADD LITTLE OR NO VALUE for customers?

Record the answers. Look for themes – areas of agreement & disagreement. Based on the themes that emerge, have your group answer the following questions:

  • For Areas of Current Incredible Value – How do we continue to grow the value delivered to provide even greater advantage?
  • For Areas that Don’t Deliver Incredible Value Because of Limitations – How can we work around resource limitations? What are new approaches to increase value? If we can’t fix this, should we eliminate trying to have an impact in these areas?
  • For Areas Where Little or No Value is Delivered – Is each of these critical? Are there opportunities to exit, eliminate, or re-work these activities? If it’s warranted, what steps can we take to make dramatic improvements in the value delivered?

“What’s It Like?”

This exercise has you look for analogous situations to yours, going to school on others who are smarter or better than you are in solving similar challenges.

The first step is to identify the characteristics of your situation or challenge, asking yourself the following questions to find ways to generalize your situation:

  • What is this really trying to accomplish?
  • How would I describe this situation in 5 – 7 words?
  • What’s this like in other businesses?

Identify who else faces a similar situation to your generalized business challenge and then use their perspective to identify how they’d address your situation and solve it:

  • Who else faces this?
  • How are they addressing it?
  • What would it be like if we addressed it similarly?

There are many more strategic thinking exercises, but these two are beneficial ones to apply to common business situations that you may face.

Turning Strategic Thinking Into Creating Strategic Impact

Strategic thinking often falls short because specific outcomes are difficult to trace back to the effort put into strategic thinking or planning.

Beyond approaches covered previously to focus strategic thinking, broaden participation, and increase its rigor, a few principles can help create more tangible outcomes.

Be prepared with a rigorous prioritization approach – Frequently, 5 to 15% of the possibilities from a strategic thinking session have near-term development potential or strong relevance. A great first pass prioritization approach is to approximate the number of ideas your team has generated and divide it by 5 to arrive at 20% of the ideas. Divide this total by the number of participants; the result represents how many ideas each person will be able to select based on their belief in an idea’s strength and/or potential.

Let participants start narrowing – With their individual idea “allowances” set, participants can begin selecting ideas that they’ll take through the prioritization process. Ideas chosen can be their own or those of others. The important thing is that participants believe in the ideas they select.

After each team member has selected a set of ideas, ask them to make an initial assessment of each idea using the following questions – What are the idea’s strengths? What are the idea’s weaknesses? What’s unexpected or unusual about the idea relative to the status quo? What’s your initial recommendation about how the idea could be addressed? It’s beneficial to share these initial thoughts aloud to familiarize group members with ideas that may have been overlooked.

Perform individual ranking with group input – Following the initial report-out, use a 4-box grid to allow individuals to place their ideas relative to two dimensions:

  • Potential Impact – On a scale from Minimal to Dramatic
  • Implementation Ease – On a scale from Easy to Difficult

Once individuals have placed ideas on the grid, talk through each one to see what support or challenges there are within the group. Typically, team members will overstate the number of easy to implement ideas that are expected to have dramatic impact. If true, these ideas are very attractive, but often they’ll have less impact or may be more difficult to implement than originally suspected.

Don’t be afraid to consider moving an idea if there’s a clear take from the group that it’s stronger or weaker than its original placement. The result of this combined individual-group exercise should be a much more refined set of ideas, with a good deal of input to set the stage for selecting a few ideas that will be pursued further for development.

Keep track of what’s left over – It pays to track the ideas that aren’t selected initially. These often resurface later and it’s nice to be able to tie them back to the strategic thinking efforts that you’ve been conducting.

WRAP-UP

Ideally you are better prepared to cultivate strategic thinking in your department or business and then to do something with it. Subscribe to the Brainzooming blog, get ongoing learning, and schedule some time soon for fruitful strategic thinking!  – Mike Brown

 

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The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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