Tools | The Brainzooming Group - Part 189 – page 189
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Following-up yesterday’s post on the challenge of finding the next BIG idea, use this alternative approach to generate many ideas with potential for significant business impact:

 

1. Use market-driven insights, brand objectives, and strategic leverage points in your business to identify a few specific areas to consider for possible innovations. Think “a dramatically lighter, more compact laptop computer” instead of “big improvements in computers.”

2. With a cross functional group, employ a wide variety of ideation techniques focused on your innovation target. (Don’t know any techniques? Consider an outside facilitator, Google innovation creativity techniques brainstorming tool for hundreds of thousands of source links, or email me for a list.) Your goal should be generating and recording at least 1,000 possible ideas – in a day or over a period of time.

3. Have the same or another cross-functional group select 100 ideas seen as having potential promise for significant business impact.

4. Apply the 5 questions* below to each of the 100 ideas, generating at least one new idea from each question (net result – your 100 ideas should become 500+ ideas):

“How could we make this idea as _______________________?”

  • DRAMATIC as a Broadway show opening?
  • COOL as the design of Apple products?
  • EXCITING as a triple overtime basketball game?
  • SIMPLE as a baby’s rattle?
  • FUN as a blockbuster comedy movie?

* The important point is the question form; they’re designed to get larger and different thinking than is typical. If there are other “orange” words more appropriate to your product or services, revise the questions.

5. Using the 500 new ideas plus the original 100, have people select 75 that they believe have breakthrough potential. For more background on prioritizing ideas, visit this previous post.

6. Narrow the list further using a potential impact (minimal to dramatic) vs. implementation ease (very easy to difficult) grid. Be on the lookout for dramatic ideas with slight implementation difficulty. These could be strong prospects for big ideas whose implementation hurdles can give you a development window advantage versus competitors.

7. Pick a manageable set of strong ideas for development. No guarantees that you now have a big idea, but there’s a higher probability they’ll emerge from this type of effort.

Want another way to judge ideas with “BIG” potential early on? When someone says an idea aloud in a group, two reactions often suggest ones with great potential:

  • A noticeable “Oooooh” from others, usually followed by a breathless silence as the idea sinks in.
  • The idea’s met with loud laughter, signaling it pushes outside comfort zones and triggers a nervous response.

There you have it. Best wishes in finding a lot of ideas with GREAT potential! – Mike Brown

 

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Download the free Brainzooming eBook, “Taking the NO Out of InNOvation” to help you generate fantastic creative ideas for any other area of your life! For an organizational creativity boost, contact The Brainzooming Group to help your team be more successful by rapidly expanding strategic options and creating innovative plans to efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can deliver these benefits for you.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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I’m at the marcusevans Market Resarch & Consumer Insights conference today talking about strategic thinking and the opportunity that market researchers have to contribute to broader strategic success in their companies. One of the keys to delivering on this promise is to have strong relationships with your key market research partners.

Several years ago, I sat down with our main market research company to address what was wrong in our strategic relationship. Taking the approach that we both had faults leading to problems in our relationship was a constructive way to get both of us back on track. The “Ten Things” list can work for almost any market research relationship. Fell free to use or adapt it with your marketing partners:
Ten Things – The Foundation to a Strategic Research Relationship
  1. Be a “thought partner” with us. This is a two-way street – we’ve got to treat you like one before you can do what it takes to become one.
  2. Your energy and passion for what you do (and your intellectual curiosity) need to be evident.
  3. There’s a difference between researchers who think they’re researchers and researchers who see themselves as business people. It’s tough to explain the differences, but they’re readily apparent. We need researchers who think like business people if we are to be successful.
  4. Understand our business more deeply than from just the numbers that you see. If not, we’ll never get to where we must go.
  5. Bring creativity to questioning, analysis, and reporting (and any place else in the process). That means generating new ideas to produce breakthroughs on mutual efficiencies, high impact insights, easy to grasp reporting, and actionable recommendations.
  6. We must put information into context. We can’t afford to just report numbers or even changes in numbers. We need to get to insights. What does it mean? What do we do about it?
  7. We have to get beyond reports that show charts and have bullets that merely say what is on the chart. We have to offer our audiences relevant insights. That takes pulling information from various sources (including people) and analyzing, talking, and identifying relationships among everything we’re looking at.
  8. Look outside our industry or outside research circles for ways to report information. Review Edward Tufte, Richard Saul Wurman, and others. Are there movie scenes that help us get our points across? Magazine ads? Always ask the question: “What’s that like?”
  9. Communicate proactively – let’s make sure we talk and we’re all clear on things before moving ahead. That may mean a phone call instead of an email.
  10. Exhibit strong attention to detail – that way we can get beyond fact & spell checking and spend our time on delivering insights.

If you can get to this point with your research partners, you’ll truly be doing COOL WORK that matters and that can change your company and your industry. WOW!!!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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It’s early March, so spring HAS to be just around the corner (I HOPE!). Spring’s a time for new growth as farmers focus on the upcoming growing season, ensuring that they’re taking all the necessary steps to increase the yield from their efforts. So thinking about business opportunities that you need to grow and exploit, who better to delegate your creative thinking to than a farmer who is experienced at proven ways to grow and harvest successfully.

Remember, use the great growth techniques below that farmers use and generalize how you may be able to apply each of them in at least 3 ways to generate new creative ideas for growth in your opportunities.

  • Researches the best crop to plant for the land & environmental conditions
  • Prepares the soil
  • Plants the crops at the proper time
  • Waters the crops to stimulate initial growth
  • Fertilizes to ensure maximum growth
  • Protects the growing crops against insects and other adverse conditions
  • Buys crop insurance in case problems environmental problems develop
  • Harvests the crop when it’s ready
  • Follows market information on crop prices to know when and/or how to sell what’s harvested
  • Sells the harvested crops
  • Rotates crops periodically to keep the soil healthy

Happy growing with your new creative ideas; remember it’s less than a month until spring!

Check out a compilation of “Change Your Character” creative thinking exercises and information on its use.  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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There’s a great article by Dan and Chip Heath in this month’s Fast Company about the value of simple, straight forward checklists to improve performance. It’s a reminder of the value of checklists as strategic tools to help ensure that you’re thinking through both routine and new situations in structured ways. Problems on a recent trip underscored that point along with the realization that effective checklists don’t always have to be written.

During a “major winter weather event” (KC television weather jargon for “snow”), I was monitoring the weather by looking out the window and watching The Weather Channel. I was unaware that our airport had been closed for hours until my traveling companion called to ask when I was going to the airport and what my alternatives were.

It was suddenly essential to develop a checklist to evaluate viable options so that our trip didn’t fall apart. The resulting checklist works in many instances where a plan looks as if it’s in jeopardy of not succeeding:

  • Identify critical plan priorities that can’t be compromised. (We had to arrive Sunday night; all else could be adjusted on the road.)
  • Increase flexibility / options right away to be able to still achieve the priorities. (That meant downsizing my checked bag to a carry-on in 5 minutes and getting to the airport ASAP to have the opportunity to make more flight options.)
  • Secure access to the necessary information flow. (We determined that on the ground info was our best source – first at the counter, then at the gate.)
  • Develop likely scenarios and their implications. (Since it was an airport-wide delay, we had to get as early a flight as possible, while being prepared to catch the latest connecting flight possible.)
  • Secure the resources to operate in the most likely scenarios. (Our important resources were charged phones, water and food to take along, and each other – splitting up & teaming as necessary to get to the front of the customer service line ASAP.)

The end result? We made it on an earlier scheduled flight that left an hour after our original plane was supposed to depart. Our 2-hour Chicago layover was consumed by the delay; we walked off the plane in Chicago and went right to our original connecting flight. We had food because we’d planned ahead, so it wasn’t a big deal to miss eating at Midway. We arrived only 15 minutes late vs. the prospect of arriving 5 hours late. And the checklist made all the difference!

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Part 3 of delegating relationship issues to advice columnists in the Change Your Character exercise, has them providing thoughts on improving challenging and strained relationships. For each piece of personal relationship fixing advice, brainstorm three ways you can apply the advice to mending problematic business relationships.

  • Own up to your responsibility. Don’t judge the other person.
  • Don’t procrastinate – start the reconciliation process right away & work on it daily.
  • Don’t be an idiot and do something you’ll regret later.
  • Call on a higher power for help.
  • Make your intentions clear to each other.
  • Communicate – ask questions, listen, and seek to understand what’s wrong in the relationship.
  • (Re)establish trust.
  • Suggest several solutions that address both parties’ needs.
  • Be prepared to renegotiate the relationship structure.
  • Be prepared for uncomfortable moments.
  • Give the other person the space they may need.
  • Keep busy – don’t veg out.
  • Set up a schedule to communicate.

Along with the previous posts on building and maintaining relationships, you should have a full complement of ideas that you can consider for strengthening business relationships!

Check out a compilation of “Change Your Character” creative thinking exercises and information on its use.  – Mike Brown

 

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to the free Brainzooming blog email updates.

The Brainzooming Group helps make smart organizations more successful by rapidly expanding their strategic options and creating innovative plans they can efficiently implement. Email us at info@brainzooming.com or call us at 816-509-5320 to learn how we can help you enhance your strategy and implementation efforts.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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Here’s the second installment of one of my favorite posts – the Rules of Can’t Be Right. This edition is focused on written reports. Here are some important checks you can use to spot potential errors:

  • Ask yourself, “What else could this mean?” If you didn’t know what it was saying beforehand, could you really tell someone what your point is?
  • Look at written prose in a different font or format than you originally used to write it. Doing this freshens your eyes to spot mistakes in something that you’ve spent quite a bit of time working on. (It’s amazing how frequently I’ll miss a mistake while writing this blog that becomes readily apparent when it’s published in Blogger with a different look.)
  • When you have a bulleted list, check to see if the beginning words are of the same type (i.e., all verbs, all of the same tense, etc.) and if each line ends in the same way (period, no period).
  • Run the spelling and grammar checkers. Yes, it’s completely basic, but that doesn’t mean people always do it.
  • Print it and read it out aloud. You’ll be surprised to find how fractured something that looks right can sound when you’re speaking it.
  • Have someone else take a look at it. That’s another way to get a fresh set of eyes as a double check. If the person is unfamiliar with the topic, all the better since they won’t subconsciously fix problems that more experienced people might.
  • Ask yourself, “What knowledge am I assuming that the reader has on this topic?” Figure out how you can eliminate the need for the assumption to be necessary by providing the background to understand your material.

Please leave comments with tips you use to double check work and look for mistakes. We’ll run them in a future installment of the rules of CBR.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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During ideation and strategic thinking exercises, we use individual, colorful sticky notes in great quantities to capture new ideas and comments. This contrasts with keeping meeting notes on a single big white easel pad. We employ colorful sticky notes so aggressively because they provide a variety of advantages for strategic thinking exercises through effectiveness and efficiency.

Sticky notes allow:

  • Sustainability – written ideas gain tangibility and “life,” moving beyond dependence on someone remembering the creative idea for something to happen with it.
  • Portability – individual sticky note ideas can be moved from one place to another for sharing, further work, or later electronic capture.
  • Visibility – creative ideas can be displayed on walls in the meeting room so all participants can review and consider them, even if they weren’t in the sub-team that generated the idea.
  • Combinations – in moving an idea written on a sticky note, you can arrange and group multiple ideas to trigger new ideas, develop / clarify emerging themes, or create a natural sequence.
  • Separation – the opposite of combining ideas, a sticky note’s portability allows participants to review ideas and select those they find intriguing and may want to advocate for development.
  • Boundaries – different colors, shapes, and sizes allow you to subtly distinguish between the output of various exercises or teams.
  • Ranking – individual ideas can be placed on a matrix or ranked on a single criterion, allowing a group to interactively and quickly prioritize ideas that are more attractive.
  • Revisiting – because the idea has been given initial tangibility through being written, it can be revisited during or after a session so that opportunities not emerging right away still have the possibility of being identified later.
  • Disposal – you can also easily recycle sticky notes when you’re done with them.

So if you want to help make your ideas stick (and not stick), get yourself some sticky notes.

Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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