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Thinking back through teams I’ve led in my career, there are clearly project team members you’re always happy to have on a project team. There are also team members you dread having involved on your project.

Want to be one of those always in demand project team members?

Fingers-Team

Photo by:; jarts | Source: photocase.com

Here’s a seven-step recipe to follow when it comes to project team meetings:

  • Rather than bringing challenging questions you’re anticipating asking to a meeting, send them to the group leader ahead of time. This allows the team leader time to think about the questions – and potentially answer the questions at the meeting before you even have to ask.
  • Take time to prepare the pre-work you’ve been asked to do. While you’re at it, anticipate other pre-work the team leader should have asked for but didn’t and work on that too.
  • Show up early for the meeting to lend support (and to get a sense of the meeting venue, too).
  • Come to the initial meeting – whether in-person or online – with whatever form of a smile and a nodding head is appropriate for the meeting format.
  • Encourage others on the team by being a cheerleader for the group.
  • Let small mistakes or issues during the meeting that concern you but aren’t tripping anyone else up slide until you can discuss them privately with the team leader after the meeting.
  • Stay late to provide affirmation to the leader and see what else you can do to help make the effort successful.

Trust me . . . if you do these things, you’ll be in more demand than you can imagine! – Mike Brown

 

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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6 Responses to “Project Team Members – 7 Steps to Be an In Demand Team Member”

  1. Especially agree with “Let small mistakes or issues during the meeting that concern you but aren’t tripping anyone else up slide until you can discuss them privately with the team leader after the meeting.” I think that keeping the big picture in mind, not just our own situation, is the essence of being a team player.

    • Great point. But some people just can’t help themselves from pulling at those loose strings. A little due diligence prior to the meeting to tighten up things minimizes these disruptions. I like to pre-wire people that I know are going to get sideways easily with an informal review. Takes time and additional planning, but it’s worth it.

  2. I sent this to a friend of mine, a former co-worker who I nicknamed the ‘meeting terrorist’ for his ability to destroy project teams. He’s a better friend now that he’s a former co-worker! 🙂 He saw meeting disruption as helping the team fully vet ideas and he saw himself as preventing group thinking — he saw his role as a positive contribution. The heated debates did produce good results at times…
    What do you think is the right balance between diving into a healthy debate with the full team vs. keeping momentum going?

    • Mike Brown says:

      I think if it’s an issue that affects the whole team, you definitely dive in, Vince. If it’s something that’s of particular interest to you that would derail the rest of the group, I’d recommend trying to handle it individually, if at all possible. Interestingly, I see this in a lot of RCIA classes . . . sponsors will raise issues that bother them that have little relevance for the candidates.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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    […] Thinking back through teams I’ve led in my career, there are clearly project team members you’re always happy to have on a project team. There are also team members you dread having involved on your project.  […]

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    […] Thinking back through teams I’ve led in my career, there are clearly project team members you’re always happy to have on a project team. There are also team members you dread having involved on your project.  […]