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Hays-KSI was back home in Western Kansas for the third time in a month this past week.

Time to share a few thoughts, Larry King style, from these road trips:

Strategic Thinking on Relationships

I tend to think I hug people fairly readily, but based on recent experience, that’s not the case. Nevertheless, a hug is wonderful to solidify what might be a loose bond with someone . . . By the time there’s three people in a car, you have a resident expert on most topics within arm’s reach . . . If we think there are meaningless events and moments in our lives, it’s only because we haven’t figured out (or been open to learning) how to use them for a bigger purpose yet.

When you’re dealing with a really boisterous person, don’t forget to look for the soft-spoken individual underneath all the bluster. Chances are that individual is in there, but just afraid to be seen . . . In thirty years, and probably less, it’s apparently possible for people to completely lose sight of why they are where they are, how they got there, and what holds them together . . . If you don’t make a practice of it, start making a practice of getting these words out of your mouth: “Could you help me . . . ?” If you ask enough people, someone will want to help you . . . Checking a profile of someone rumored to be cheating with someone else, the ad on the alleged cheater’s online profile page was for detailed info on cheating spouses. Wow! Google even includes rumors in the advertising algorithm!

Experiences that Shape Us

You become what you’ve experienced. There may be ways to fight it, but what you’ve experienced always tugs at you, even in completely unforeseen ways . . . The human capacity for being shitty to others we used to love is incredible and pathetic all rolled into one . . . We all have the power to ignore the fashion statements of others . . . I never knew someone from our student activities group in college took Pat Benatar shopping at a mall the day she performed at our school. I only got to go shopping for a stool for Chet Atkins to sit on when he performed . . . Is there a song like “One of these things is not like the others,” to encourage kids to see similarities instead of differences? If not, somebody needs to write it.

Having a phone that’s decided to quit telling me I have voice mail messages is great for peace and quiet, but crappy for running a business . . . A reader left me an incredibly gracious message saying how thankful she was for the help provided by reading the blog. I want to re-listen to her message every morning for the rest of my life . . . Facebook is the ties that bind . . .What a blessing to learn that things you hoped made an impact on people really did . . . Go ahead and count your blessings instead of sheep . . .There are times when it would be great to be adept at writing fiction instead of focusing on writing blog posts. Sometimes, there’s just nothing like a short story to capture a moment. – Mike Brown

 

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Mike Brown

Founder of The Brainzooming Group, and an expert on strategy, creativity, and innovation. Mike is a frequent speaker on innovation, strategic thinking, and social media.

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One Response to “Strategic Thinking: Ideas from the Road in Western Kansas”

  1. I especially like “. . . start making a practice of getting these words out of your mouth: “Could you help me . . . ?” If you ask enough people, someone will want to help you . . .” I sometimes need remind myself of the importance of outside support and input. Thanks, Mike!